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Full text of "CU Amiga Magazine Buyers Guide 1994"

AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



USIC 




Music Composition 



KCS 3.5 

£311 -KEY AUDIO SYSTEMS 
0245 344001 



When the Atari ST 
reigned as MIDI 
computer supreme, one 
Amiga product bravely 
bucked the trend. Br Fs 
KCS was thai program. 



If you were a competent musi- 
cian in the Amiga's earlier days, 
you'd have been hard pushed to 
find a decent sequencer at all, 
let alone one- which could aland 
against the packages found on 
other computers. KCS was the 
Qn& exception, and it oflered 
everything a professional MIDI 
musician required, 

FOUR IN ONE 

In fact KCS is several programs 
which can be linked using the 
MPE or Mulli Program 
Environment. The program was 
written before Hotlinks became a 
buzzword, but that's essentially 
what the MPE is: several indepen- 
dently running programs linked by 
the MPE menu. It memory is 
short, or you don't need the other 
programs, you don't have to load 
them at all. 

The programs are: KCS- the 
main recording section, Tiger -a 
step time recording module, 
Ouickscore - a score printer and 
PVG (Programmable Variations 
Generator) - for getting the com- 
puter to write the music for you. 

The main KCS pfogram allows 
you lo record your compositions a 
track at a time, either in real time, 
or by typing in each note in much 
the same way as you would with a 
tracker program. The program 
supports up to 46 tracks, and 
each of these is listed in the upper 



Th* main KCS screen 19 rather spartan 
and this may prove inlimidolinn »s if* 
not »try lnlwd|h<» la use 



part of the screen, along with an 
indicator showing which MIDI 
channel the track is outputting to, 
and what its status is. 

The main screen also provides 
control for Fostex tape decks 
although these are there mainly 
as a throwback lo the days of 
multi-track recording. 

The KCS work screen is very 
spartan and quite intimidating to a 
npn musician such as myself. If 
you also fit that category perhaps 
you might be more comfortable in 
the Tiger section of the program. 



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What About..? 




SEQUENCER 1 PLUS 

£129.95 - GAD JITS - 061 236 2515 



II is considerably simpler than its rivals, und even the sera en layouts seem designed Id tie 
bright and inviting. The program again cons-isis nl multiple sections. The track list is 
inhere you can play along, recording your efforts in real lime, it you have We Inclination, 
alternatively VV might prefer le enter yourn ales instep time via the Step Editor . This 
uses a similar system lo KC& Tiger program, although whilst Setweacer Hs la r friendlier 
and easier to use, tfCS oilers far more faaiu .res. 

The other parts of the program are the Bar Editor where you can select wnicti lo edit, the 
Tempo Map where yrju can draw the speed at which the various parts ol your in ne replay 
and the Jiikehui which tels you create a sung llsl so that multiple songs tan be played 
sequentially. 



CONCLUSION 

Saaaancer J Ptosis a very nice way tor beginners to gel inlo MIDI sequencing. Whilst Its 
features fall a lung way short of KCS it Bars & Plpet, so does its price lag- The program 
provides you with the tools needed la record basic MIDI music The lad lhat il can load 
and save standard MIDI lilei is a bonus because il ynu want to upgrade to a more n rales - 
lional package lata, ypu can still use all your Sequencer 1 lures 
Compatible: Any Amiga 

You can us* lh* JuU*6ok seclion le string many songs together Into a performance. 
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Tiger presents your score in a 
graphical torn, one track at a 
time. The upper window contains 
a representation o( your score, 
with each note being shown as a 
thick bar wilh a thin stick poking 
out of the top. The longer the bar, 
the greater the note's duration 
and the higher the stick the louder 
the note. The bar's overall posi- 
tion vertically determines the 
note's pitch, the further up the 
window, the higher the note. 
You can also draw control 
change information such as modu- 
^^^^__ lation and pitch 
^^^■M bend. These are 
represented in the 
bottom section ot 
the screen where 
you represent them 
as waveforms, the 
steeper the wave, 
the faster (or more 
acute) the effect. 

Once you've cre- 
ated a score, you 
can print it out in 
traditional notation 
using the 
Ouickscore program. You can 
choose to print a multi-track score 
in orchestral mode (all tracks 
printed one beneath the other) or 
in solo mode where the tracks are 
printed one at a time. Obviously* 
you can also alter the clef, and 
you can even define tracks as 
drum tracks, in which case drum 
notation will be used. 

CONCLUSION 

People's reaction lo this program 
tends to tall Inlo only two cate- 
gories: they love it or they hate It. 
I have to be honest and say that I 
fall into the latter category 
because the environment is just 
too hostile for me. However, hav- 
ing watched it being used by a 
keyboard player, it became' an 
entirely different program and tie 
fell in love with it because it was 
just so easy to record a song, 
building up layer after layer in 
next to no time. I can appreciate 
the Tiger section, and I'm very 
keen on Quickscore and PVG 
(even if the latter is monstrously 
complex). If you can play an 
instrument, then perhaps you'll 
take to KCS, bul try before you 
buy. 

Compatible: Any Amiga with 1 
meg of RAM {2Mb if you want to 
run the MPE programs}. 



168 



CU AMIGA THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE TO YOUR AMIGA 



i uiri 




NEWSAGENTS - PLEASE DISPLAY 
UNTIL FEBRUARY 1994 
£3.95 



ijjiriifiteLiju. 

Mi 




LATEST NEWS AND 
REVIEWS 



USERS!! 

ALL YOU HEED TO 

KNOW ABOUT 
AMIGA SOFTWARE 




«/J4Ef UP 

TRANSFORM YOUR AMIGA 
INTO A SUPER COMPUTER 



DISCOVER THE HIDDEN POWER OF YOUR AMIGA * 

* PROGRAMMING 
• BEST AMIGA BOOK BARGAINS • 
- WHAT'S BEST FOR YOU! * 



SECTION 
ON TEST • 





MH 





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If you're looking for the ultimate in 
24-bit image capture & editing, then 
look no further ! Vidi Amiga (24) RT 
offers you features and specification 
unmatched by any rival. And what's 
most important is its compatibility. 
Vidi Amiga (24) RT will work on all 
Amiga's including A500, 1200 etc. 

Finally compare our pricing and I 
am sure you will agree that no other 
company can offer you so much for 
so little I 

SOME OF OUR FEATURES.. 

Image capture at up to full overscan 
video resolution in all AG A colour 
modes. Display images up to 
1 472 x 576. 

ANIMATION: 

Fully featured Swipe & Play 

animation workstation. 

POWERFUL IMAGE PROCESSING: 
Average, Balance, Blur, Brightness, 
Contrast, Convolve, Drop RGB, 
Edge Detect Emboss.Equalize, 
Exposure, Flip X/Y, Gamma 
Correction, Negative, Quantize, 
Saturation, Cut & Paste. 

FILE SUPPORT: 

24-bit Amiga formats, All AG A 
Modes, ILBM, ANIM, BMP, PCX, & 
TIFF. 

COMPATIBLE WITH: 
Workbench 1 .3, 2,0, & 3.0, 
Composite, SVHS or Y.C. sources. 
A500, A600, A1200, A1500, A2000, 
A3000, A4000. 



I 



These linages 

represent the 

quality of output 

achievable usinj 

Vidi Amiga (24JJR 



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Rombo, Kirkton Campus, Livingston, SCOTLAND, EH54 7AZ. 
Tel: (44)0506 414631 Fax: (4 4)0506 414634 













Rombo, are proud to announce the launch of their new range of 
Multimedia Digitisers. 

Each digitizer has been designed with total flexibility in mind, by 
offering a cost effective upgrade path between models. Giving the 
user complete peace of mind, and the freedom to choose a digitizer 
for his present requirements. But reassuring him, that if those 
change, he can move up to the next model. All Vidi Amiga's now 
have a similar user interface, so moving between products is easy ! 



£HK> 



4 o 1 


H^^j^ Jfijvv\v*J 


BTl 1 29 4&**£ f »» J 


fw «2 KeHsF i&uknt, ■ 


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Vidi Amiga (12) RT, offers all the functionallity and specification 
of Vidi (24) RT, but in 12-bit. Capturing 4()96 colour images in 
real-time from any video source. This includes TV. Video Recorder, 
Video Camera, Satellite etc. etc. 

New user interface with powerful image processing and picture 
manipulation. Support for both composite and SVHS or YC inputs. 

Plug-in device with easy install software. Simple enough for the 
novice yet powerful enough for the professional. Compatible with 
all Amiga's. Never before has the Amiga market seen such value 
for money. Manufacturer upgrade available to Vidi Amiga (24) RT 
PGA Compatible with all AG A resolutions and colour modes. 



Vidi Amiga (24) RT, will push your Amiga to its limit. Real-time 
image capture in excess of broadcast quality^ True colour, photo 
-realistic picture files grabbed from any video source. Display 
resolutions up to 1472 x 576, what more can I say \ 

Vidi Amiga (24) RT offers a breakthrough for all Amiga users, 
taking them into the world of 24-bit image capture. With no 
restrictions on video equipment or Amiga hardware. 

All the pictures shown on the full page Vidi Amiga (24) RT advert 
represent the actual printed output quality that can be achieved, 
Simply by sending the finished image file to a Bureau for output. 

Throw away your scanner, its too much like hard work ! 





Roinhi 



Rd, 

0506 41' 



£2»» 



wL ****** 



impus, rjvingsici 
;i\: 0511ft 414634 



Contents 



ISSUE ONE -WINTER 1994 



WELCOME 



r 

I You hold in your hands the 
I most authoritative guide la 
I Amiga software ever published. 
Over trie next 180 packed 
pages, we'll be taking a look at 
the top software packages an 
the Amiga plus a whale range 
of peripherals and add-ons. If 
you're serious about your 
Amiga, then you'll want to read 
the most detailed a net accurate 
reviews possible before making 
that vital purchasing decision. 
And that's were we come in. 
We've assembled a team of 
Amiga experts to help you 
choose between the myriad 
number ol programs that clog 
up the shelves at your local 
computer store. From music 
and graphics packages to mem- 
ory upgrades and accelerator 
cards, we've covered the lot. 

From budget priced pro- 
grams through to ones which 
cost hundreds of pounds we've 
tested all the major packages. 
What's mare, we've also put 
together detailed comparison 
charts, given contact numbers, 
and generally explained what 
ben el its and drawbacks each 
program oilers. So what are 
you waiting tor? Get stuck in to 
this weighty tome and discover 
the hidden power that lurks 
within your Amiga. 





Dan Slingsby - Editor 



6 GRAPHICS 

More than any other home computer. the Amiga is capable of 
generating stunning graphics and animations. It's not jusl the 
wonderful AGA chipset that's to thank either, because the 
Amiga is supported by a wonderlul array of staie-ofihe-art 
graphics packages. 

In this section, we take a look al a selection of the very 
best ranging Irom art and animation packages to ray tracers 
and even fractal animators. For (he high power user, we've 
e^en included a selection ot professional and semi-pro graph- 
ics boards. 



ao GAMES 

The world would be a duller place il all we had to do on the 
Amiga was load up spreadsheets and databases, Luckily, the 
world's number one home computer is blessed with more 
than its lair share of classic games. Take your pick Irom 
Frontier, Speetfhait 2, Monkey tsiand 2 and driers too numer- 
ous to mention. As well as giving our own personal 
recommendations of hoi games, we also take a look al cheap 
budget releases and nominate games for the computer-equiv- 
alent of the Golden Turkey awards. Find out which are the 
winners and losers here! 







58 PROGRAMMING 

Want lo become the next Sinsible Sollware or Bitmap 
Brothers? Then al some stage in your career you're going lo 
have 10 leam to program. Sorry, but (here really isn't any 
other way to do it. Fortunately, Ihe 
Amiga is blessed wilh a huge range of 
prograrnmingi aids to help you on 
your way. 

Whether you wan! to start 
slowly with AMOS or Basic, or dive 
in at the deep end with assembler or 
C. you're certain lo find the right 
pointers lo help you select the best lan- 
guage for your requirements and ability 

70 BUSINESS 

When it comes to managing a business, 
there's a broad selection of software 
available to help you gel things running 
smoothly. Starting with basic programs 
such as word processors and 
databases, and going on to 
cover more specific 
items such as stock 
control and cashflow 
forecasting, we 
review the pro- 
grams that you 
really need. 



104 ROOKS 

Stanng at a blank screen isn't going to 
get you very lar when trying to come lo 
grips wilh Ihe Amiga. Instead of acting 
like a zombie, why not pick up one ot 
ihB many fine literary tomes dedicated 
to Ihe Amiga computer and harness, 
the hidden power of your machine? 
Whether youVe just bought your 
first Amiga, or you're about to start 
learning your third 
language 
youl 





WofcwneOne 




find 

that our books' guidB is 
your first step to compuler 
enlightenment. After that, 
all you have to do is 
choose a title and away 
you go, 



fe 




J 



I 



1 1 DESK TOP PUBLISHING 1 34 ADD-ONS 



Have you ever wanted to create your own leaflets, posters Of 
even magazines.? It's no! as dillicult as you may think, espe- 
cially when yau rake i mo consideration the many excellent 
packages (hat exist to help you do so. 

From budget-priced programs through lo profesisiongl 
packages and desk-top scanners, there is something to suil 
all needs and tastes. Whether you want to produce a full- 
colour magazine or a simple A5 black and white leaflet, we 
lake a look at the best programs available. 




116 DESK TOP VIDEO 

Whether you're a latent Jeremy Beadle, or a closet David 
Lynch, you'll find all the necessary inside gen on how lo 
make movies on your Amiga tucked away in this section. We 
review and rate all the software and hardware available to 
help you in your quest for immortality. 

Whether you're looikingi at genlocks, video cameras, edit- 
ing software or console decks here's where you'll find your 
answers, complete with impartial buying advice, 

1 26 EDUCATION 

OF course, the Amiga is also a great teaching tool - given the 
right programs to run, If you've a young child and wanl to 
stimulate their mind or creative tendeneles h then the compre- 
hensive range of educational software that's available is just 
the thing, From Fun School to National Curriculum subjects, 
there's something for everyone here. 



If you're going to expand your mind, it won't be long before 
you'll be looking to beef up your Amiga to match, Whether it's 
an extra Floppy drive, or a half meg RAM upgrade,, or some- 
thing altogether more substantial, thrs is the place to look for 
unbiased advioB. 

With a lew carefully chosen accessories it's possible to 
transform your Amiga into a lean, mean super computer, 
Whether you awn an A4000, A 1200 or even an A5O0, we 
show you how to tap its hidden power, 

149CD32 

And we couldn't possibly give you a buyers guide without a 
look at software lor Commodore's latest marvel, the CD32. 
And we haven't lorgotten all you CDTV and A570 CD HOM 
drive owners out there either, as we detail exactly what's 
available for your particular piece of kit. 

Ottering what is undoubtedly the most comprehensive 
summary of existing and Future titles, as well as detailed com- 
patibility listings showing all the great CDTV software that 
you can still use on your slate oF the art console, this is sim- 
ply the CD ROM standard for others to match! 

161 MUSIC 

Although olher computers became known as ideal tools for 
musicians thanks to their built-in MIDI interfaces, Ihe Amiga 
offers unequalled music power thanks to ils ability to replay 
up to four sound samples simultaneously via one of two 
stereo channels. Of course, if you prefer a more professional 
environment, the Amiga can also offer a MIDI set up that is 
the equal of any other computer, 

In our sound section we evaluate some of the most excit- 
ing, music software, including trackers and notalors for 
creating professional scores. We also play around with a few 
MIDI instruments to show you what represents the best start- 
ing place for new musicians. 




:> 




THE ULTIMATE AMIGA 
BUYERS GUIDE 94 

Editor 

Dan SNngsby 
Technical Editor 

MatBmaTnliald 
Write* 

Mill Broomlield 

Jason Hoi Irani 

Garyfefllori 

Steve Merrett 

Tony Dillon 

JDilyan Ralph 

June Brierley 

Sell Lbb-DbMsic 

Dan Siinusb j 

Production 

A vary tired Dan as the* 

Woultfn'1 pay lor anyone I 

Art Editor 

Jo wjnslom 

Design 

Wendy Martin 

Hands Design 

Steve Rumney 

and a East ol th uusanrts 

Publisher 

Garry Williams 

PRINTED IN THE 111 

The UHimatB Amiga Buyer's Guile '94 
may not be reproduced without our writ- 
ten permission. We eannQl accept 
liability lor mistakes ar misprints. We 
regret ihji tut cinnol offer atfviee on a 
personal basis, either by phone or by 
post, ax there just aren't an unah haurj 
in Ihe day as ii Is. Editorial address: 
EMAP Imarjfl. Priory Court. 3D-32 
Farringdon Luna, London, EC1H 3AU. 

S EMAP Images 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Graphic 




Graphics 



The Amiga 's graphics capabilities are 
legendary. Over the next few pages 
we'll be taking an in-depth look at the 
numerous ways that you can harness 
the Amiga's graphics power. 



Whether you're creatively 
gifted or not, you can still 
use the Amiga to create a 
stunning variety ot exciting 
aod attractive images ranging from 
impressionist pictures to photo-realis- 
tic animated landscapes, it you are 
fortunate enough to have some imag- 
ination,, there are dozens it not 
hundreds ol graphics packages just 
waiting to turn your ideas into reality. 
Over the next forty or so pages, we'll 
be taking a look al the very besl that 
the Amiga has to offer, But first, let's 
have a bit of a history lesson. 

A BIT OF HISTORY 

The Amiga was first unveiled to the 
world on July 23rd 1&85 in the form ol 
the A1 000. Initially touted as a busi- 
ness machine, sales were slow and a 
machine with less power than an 
A500 cost a month's wages or more. 
When Ihe Amiga 500 was released, 
sales eventually started to pick up. 
and it was for its gaming abilities that 
the machine became popular. 

However, the first thing that most 
Amiga converts saw, were stunning 
pictures in magazines showing the 
incredible graphics Itial the new 
home wonder machine was capable 
of. Games such as Defender of the 
Crown. King of Chicago and a host of 
olhers ensured that users who at that 
time were used to the 1 6- colour dis- 
plays ol the Commodore 64 and 
Spectrum were lalling over them- 
selves to buy into the act. 

Ironically, even the best of these 
games only used 32 colours on a tow 
resolution display; quite mundane by 

i ■ i MJiTt- f - J - " | 



l he Amiga's own standards. 
However, what made ihese graph- 
ics so impressive was the fact that 
the user could define his 32 colour 
palette from a choice of 4096 
colours. Compared lo the 
Spectrum, Amsirad and C64 which 




H wat high quality gomos graphics such ai 
the** lafcen from 0s'««e*e r ol the CrtrmltiB" 
really rteiped the Amiga to- becom* popular. 




had fixed palettes, this was a dream 
come true. 

PARTNERS IN CRIME 

From the very earliest days. 
Commodore were aware of the 
impact of their machine's graphics, 



and they wisely got together with 
Electronic Arts lo arrange to bundle 
the paint package, Deluxe Paint, with 
every single Amiga sold. Since then, 
there has never been an Amiga 
package which did not include a ver- 
sion of the program. This means that 




Over tfw years., our readers' art sections have allrseled hundred* ef superb pictures such is ttMM ajEHllent axsmplas. 



IMPROVING YOUR OUTLOOK 

Unlike PCs which require dedicated manilars in order to see what you're doing, lhe Amiga can be used an an grdi nary television set via 

" S TnTrS'lhe Amiga represent? Graphics as 3 digital RGB signal which contains precise values lor Ihe amount of red, green and blue 
in every pixel en Ihe screen The television also understands this RGB signal, but unfortunately liases an analogue interlace with the 
resist the world. Pul simply, Ihe aerial socket is nol designed le accept a precise RGB signal. The modulator unveils Hie Amiga s out- 
ant Into what's known as a composite signal, and this is then converted inlo a modulated RF Iradio Irequency) signal which IIie 
television can understand via its aerial sottasl. Once the RF signal reaches fire TV, Ms internal eircuilry demodulates Ihe signal back into 
a eempusile lorm before being decoded into its RGB component ready tor display on ihe screen. 

The trouble with this melhod is that in Ihe process et conversion Irom RGB to Hr (via composite) and back to RGB again, Ihe i signs 
loses a greal deal of duality (especially on cheap home TVs), and so Ihe screen display is poorly focused and the colours are indistinct 
al best. The higher the resolution, the worse Ihe problem becomes- 

II yon have a modem television set, Ihere Is a simple way that fan can improve your 
display for only about £15 - buy a scan lead. 

Most modern TV sets conlain a SCART socket al Ihe beck I more commonly called a 
Eurnsocket), This socket provides a way for you In interlace diraclly wild Ihe set's display 
circuitry without having to go through all Ihese harmlul conversion processes. 

You can purchase SCART leads Irom vi rlu ally any Amig a dealer, and once you have one , 
you can plug it directly into your TV and the benelils are Immediate and impressive. There 
is one olher benefit which is less obvious: the SCART cable plugs inlo your Amiga where Ihe 
modulator used to go. Because it Is just a small plug, there's no more danger ol damaging 
Ihe Video port by snapping Iha modulator oft when ycu lean Ihe computer backwards! 





AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 




Sea la MM 21 a is 
one ol Ihe beat 
professional pre- 
sentation 

packages avail- 
able, and 11 s used 
all over the world 
in places such is 
hotels, aifporis 
and shopping cen- 
tres, etc. 



every singfe Amiga owner has had 
the opportunity lo create graphics for 
themselves without spending money 
on additional software. 

01 course, it has also meant that 
Deluxe Paint has become the de 
facto standard, arid its name has 



become synonymous wilh art pack- 
ages, Although this has made it 
difficult for rival products to gain a 
foothold, a few strong contenders 
have nevertheless arisen over the 
last year. 

Another advantage of Ihe D-Paint 



connection has been that magazines 
such as CU Amiga have been able to 
plan tutorials and run competitions 
based upon computer art safe in the 
knowledge that all readers- Have 
access to similar graphics software. 
In fact C J's own Art Gallery is one of 



Ihe most popular sections of the 
magazine, and it receives many 
entries each month. 

CU Amiga Started showcasing 
reader's art in 1990. Each month a sin- 
gle screen was selected as the winner 
and it was put on the coverdisk and 
printed in the magazine. Al about the 
same time, our resident art specialist, 
Peier Lee, began a series ot tutorials 
covering everything from artistic tech- 
nique to' creative animation. When we 
dropped Ihe Screen of the Month sec- 
Bon, the outcry from readers was so 
great that we soon restarted' it. It was- 
n't long belore this section got a new 
lease of life in the magazine called Art 
Gallery. In ihe gallery we now show 
some of the slages m the construction 
of screens so that olher readers can 
hopefully pick up tips by copying the 
techniques that are used. » 




At/ow; Early ray (raced demos such as these 
W0W*d *v«f>one who saw Itiam. Al the ItmB 
graphics al Irilt qutllty were totally unheard 
□tana noma computer. 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



raphics 






dly Duo 

As the Amiga owes so much of its success to 
the quality of its graphics, its worth taking a 
second to look at the two elements that 
make those graphics so special. 

A NEW RESOLUTION 

The firsl element of the AGA machinal is the high resolutiens at winch images can he dis- 
played. As you probably know. Ihe screen is matte upol smaH rectangular ilols known as 
pixels. A screen's resolution is usually described as an X by a Y vales; in ether wonts how 
many pixels wide the screen is, by how many high- The Amiga's lowesl resolJlion is 
320(256. so Itial means that regardless nl the size of monitor or TV you display Ihe picture 
en. that picture will only he 320 pixels wide. II you double the resolution In 640x512, Ihe 
ettra pixels still only occupy Ihe same amount of screen space. As you can imagine, Iha only 
way to lil Ihe extra pixels in, is Is hail Ihsir actual size, and this is exactly whal happen?. II 
doesn't take a ureal leap ol logic to see why more pixels -and consequently i higher resolu- 
tion- is desirable. Higher resolulion = smaller pixels = a liner, more detailed image. 

Fir games, high reso Iotas are neither necessary ner particularly desirable. For 
starters, a higher resolution screen also means more pixels lo be coloured in by the graphic 
artist! It also means more processor power is needed lo move the graphics around and in the 
case of most arcade games, there just isn't enough power available to use high resolution 
graphics. For mis reason, you'll almosl never see a game thai uses high resolution screens, 
although strategy games where graphics speed isn'l important, may onl tor this mode. 

II the resoluti on of a sc re en ca n be ma de hi git en ough , on e can no longer see In e j agged 
edges harmed by rectangular pixels at all. When this sort ol resolution is reached, graphics 
are ideal lorhroadcasling or even for recording onto Iransparencyfilm. For PAL Broadcast 
wort, a resolution above 57Ex720 pixels is ideal (NTSC 486x720 (, but transparencies, espe- 
cially when they're going to lie made into posters, need lo use a higher resolution slill, and 
2DuU-sGQu!(?Q n u'-5uuo ar more is often used. 

A SPLASH OF COLOUR 

The second e lement thai d elm es how good a computer's gra ph its a re , is Its col on r reso I u- 
tion, or how many colours it can display. On the Amiga this can be guile complicated 
because the maximum number of colours lhal il can display at anyone time is usually less 
than ihe maximum number il is capable of rjene ratine. 

For example, in HAM* mode on an AGA machine such as the A4Q0D or A12QD. by using a 
sort ol pixel trickery, the computer tan display up lo 2M,Q0n colours simultaneously. 
However, those colours may be selected Irani a palette ol 16-7 million! Similarly, in hair- 
brite mode on an A50D, the Amiga can display 64 colours from a palette of 4Q96. 

So why the discrepancy I hear you ask? Well it's down to the way llialthe Amiga gener- 
ates colour using whal are known as hit-planes. A bit is Ihe technical name lor a single unit 
ol storage space in the computer's memory, and it's the smallest piece ol information that 
the computer tan hold. Each bil has only Iwo possible slates: on {represented by the digit 1) 
or oil (represented by 6). By combining bits, you can represent much larger numbers in the 
same way as you can cum bine two or more decimal characters to represent bigger numbers. 
This counting system is known asflinary, For example, look at Ihe way the tallowing Ihree 
bit number progresses. 



BINARY VALUE 
COO 
001 
010 
011 
100 
101 

no 
in 



DECIMAL VALUE 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



Wllh up to 255.000 colours on (he stretn 

a! one* me ACA machine* Offer »n 
unbealsbte graphics pgntwr 10 pMce ratio. 



Now lo return lolhe subject of bit-planes, each pixel is represented in the computer's 
memory by one or more bits. The higher Ihe number of bits, Ihe greater the number that can 
he allocated to a single pixel. Th is number points lo a specific colour in a pre-defined 'list' 
of colours. Therefore if a pixel is only represented by three bils, it can only use one of the 
colours D-7, sn you can immediately see bow il's desirable to represent each pixel using as 
many bits as possible . I n la ci , each time you add a bil-p lane . you doubl e lh e nu mber ol 
colours lhal can be used. 

In actual lact, Ihe human eye is not capable of distinguishing more than a certain num- 
ber ol d i Iter enl colours, a nd lh is number of colours can be referred lo when each piie I is 
represented by 24-bils in Ihe computer's memory. 

Incase you're wondering why all computers don't automatically come with the ability lo 
display 24-bil graphics, you should rememtier that it costs a lot ol memory to store and dis- 
play such images. For example, even a low resolution screen ol 320x256 pixels requires 
240k of memory, whilst a hi-res screen needs almost a megabyte per screen! 



GRAPHICS FOR 
MONEY 

As. the Amiga has become more- 
widespread, it has seen more and 
more commercial usage. Whereas 
the sheep may continue to use 
graphics workstations costing tens 
and even hundreds of thousands of 
pounds, the 1 smart money has gradu- 
ally turned lo the Amiga as a high 
quality, low cost graphics generator 
for professional use, 

This trend has been particularly 
pronounced in America where the 
Amiga is now seen as THE desktop 
video machine to use, thanks almost 
exclusively to the incredible Video 
Toaster from Newtek. Here in Europe, 
the Amiga's role in the commercial 
market has been largely facilitated by 
the appearance of a variety of graph- 
ics boards. The first ot these was the 
Harlequin, manufactured and dis- 
tributed by the Amiga Centre 
Scotland. 

The Harlequin is a 32 -bit display 
card lhat plugs into higher end 
machines and offers a 16,7 million 
colour display at a very high resolu- 
tion. It can be hooked up lo a 
transparency unit for output to 35mm 
film, or it can be linked directly to 
video recorders for broadcast quality 
animation. 

At over £800, Harlequin is defi- 
nitely not aimed at the home user, but 
its appearance seemed to spark otf 
massive development in the area of 
24-bit output. Soon rival boards such 
as GVP's Impact Vision 24 and 
Archos's AV24, began to appear, and 
just recently there seem to be new 
boards released every week, 

Of course, the ultimate winner in 
such a fiercely contested market is 
the consumer for il's well known that 
competition breeds innovation. It 
also brings prices tumbling down, 
and recently we've seen a number of 
boards with a price lag ol less than 
E30D. 

Because the Amiga has always 
been seen as THE graphics machine, 
it has enjoyed a great diversity of sup- 
porting software, and paint packages 
are just the tip ol the iceberg. 



rassr 



TCHING 



One demo that really wowed early 
show goers was the immortal Juggler 
animation. This was a ray traced ani- 
mation which depicted a stylised man 

juggling a couple of glass balls 
against a chequered background. By 
today's standards, the graphics were 
nut stunning, and the animation was 
nothing special, but it was the first 
time lhal ray tracing had been seen 
on an affordable home computer. It 
proved to people that the Amiga could 
be used lo produce 'real-world' graph- 
ics, in other words graphics which 
couid almost be taken from a photo- 
graph. From then g-n a steady stream 
ot development into ray tracing pack- 




Graphics 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Thinks tn the AGA 
ch Ipset. Ihe Amiga 
stands proudly back at 
the [op iis for as home 
computer* 90. No olher 
machine In a similar 
pHes band can touch II 
lor Ntw graphics power. 



ages was begun resulting in a num- 
ber of awesomely powerful programs 
which are available today. In lact one 
of these [Lightwave] was even used 
lo test Ihe dinosaur animation in 
Spielberg's recent smash, Jurassic 
Park. 

From one- type of real-world 
graphics to another, it seemed a logi- 
cal step that fractal programs should 
appear on the Amiga. Thanks to pro- 
grams such as Tomorrow's World 
and films such as Star Trek 2, fractal 
graphics had become the new buz- 
zword. On the Amiga, this took two 
forms: Iractal landscape generators 





A f -^ .■„_ "" *< * >"V *■.>' 5-;* *v_ _jr 

■i9 ■ rfft#rt-;<i 










w 






Such as Wsfa. and Mandelbrot pro- 
grams which seemed to do little more 
than generate pretty patterns. 

Although the former type ol Iractai 
program has benefitled greatly by the 
mass availability of Inexpensive 1 2- 
and 24-bit boards, I have still to see 
Amiga generated landscapes in any 
commercial offering, 

Ironically, it's the more esoteric 
and seemingly useless area of 
Mandelbrot generation that has seen 
perhaps the mosl widespread use for 
Amiga graphics, certainly in the UK 
al least- The rave culture, with its 
bright colours and acerbic music 
slyle, is the ideal complement to the 
equally vivid fractal imagery and 
Amiga graphics,- so it was not sur- 
prising when this imagery turned up 
al raves' and videos all over Europe. 

FULL CIRCLE 

In a sense, the Amiga graphics 
market has now gone full circle. 
When the Amiga was young, there 
wasn't a home machine to touch ft 
graphically. PCs were still slow and 
expensive and were running clunky 
Old CGA graphics. The Atari ST 
was the nearest rival in terms of 
price and its graphics performance 
didn't hold a candle to the Amiga. 
Of course, things change and the 
Atari Falcon was developed, whilst 
ever cheapening PCs gained VGA 
and beyond. The humble Amiga 
started to look a fail pallid by com- 
parison. That is, until Commodore 
pulled a rabbi 1 out of the proverbial 
hat yet again and released the 
AGA chip set! 

Thanks to AGA, Commodore 
were able to produce the A 1200, a 
machine which could display 
256,000 colours al once from a 
palelte of over 16,5 million. Better 
yet, they could be displayed at res- 
olutions more I nan twice as high as 
previously. The most amazing 
thing about the 1200 is its incredi- 
ble price, For about half the price 
of a comparable PC, A 1200 own- 
ers received a state of the art 
machine designed lo be the first of 
a new generation. 

Thanks to the Amiga 1200, loyal 
Commodore users can Qnce again 
revel in the fact that they ar& using 
a truly innovative machine, and 
one whose graphics capabilities 
knock the socks clean off the com- 
petition. 



The mosl popular (racial imagai of ill are 
IMo.w gurterated using Ihe Mandelbrot Ml, 
Allhough Ihey hsver *in le Intrinsic value', 
images such as Ihase hi u* been widely 
exploited by musicians and video makers, nol 
to menllon T-Shin manufacturer?! 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



Graphics 






MM 






Deluxe Paint 

4.1 AGA 



No Amiga program can claim a 
longer or more distinguished image 
than Deluxe Paint We take a 
detailed look what it has to offer. 



£99.99 - ELECTRONIC ARTS - 0753 549442 



•# 



/ 



p "I 



EB 



P 



^ 



-Cv 











*§* 





By bundling 
Deluxe Paint 
with every 
new Amiga, 
Electronic Arts have 
ensured that all 
Amiga owners knew 
their name, and 
wcuJd hence be 
potential customers 
when they released a 
new version of the 
program. Despite this 
strong position, they 
certainly can't be 
accused of churning 
the upgrades out sim- 
ply to earn another 
dollar. 

In fact Electronic 
Arts (EA) have been 
almost ponderously 
slow about upgrading 
the program 
although, to be fair, 
each of their 
upgrades has con- 
tained significant 
advances over earlier 
versions. Version 4 
was two years in the 
making, yet EA $|ill 
took the trouble to 
enhance it when the 
AGA machines were 
released. It's exactly 
(hat dedication to 
detail and customer 
satisfaclion that has 



won the company awards and 
fans the world over, 

Over the past few years, 
Deluxe Paint has been l he 
standard by which all other art 
packages have been mea- 
sured, and until recently all 
have fallen short of the ma*. 



rVc?, 



When Version 4 was released 
Ihe user-interface underwent a 
number of significant changes, 
These were primarily made to 
comply with the Workbench 2 
look that had started to 
become popular. Some of the 
changes were also made 
because unlike previous ver- 
sions of Ihe program, D-Paint 4 
now provided full HAM mode 
Support (HAMS on AGA 
machines). 

For an old-timer like myself, 
some of the style changes are 
unwelcome, but on the whole, 
the program looks slicker and more 
functional than ever before. 

As with all previous versions, the 
main drawing tools are placed in a 
vertical strip down the right-hand 
adge of the screen. Each tool is rep- 
resented by a small icon (see 
picture) which gives a stylised repre- 
sentation of its purpose. Click on the 
icon with the left mouse button and 
its colours are inverted to show that 
if s been selected. Some of the icons 




CSCou i- te t-Q [j I min- 
es Tine s 
CSTinesBold 
CSTinesBold Italic 
:STiHesItalic 




DPtlnt cm handle scalable Tenia at any sije , 

Thfl larger Ihe palnl sIzb. Ihe better the quality. 













'£?Sf 



Jile 



Mit-fui' 



are sensitive to where you click, with 
the upper left and lower right halves 
producing different results. For 
instance, click on one half ol the rect- 
angle tool and you're in hollow 
rectangle mode, dick on the other 
half and filled rectangle mode is 
selected. Multiple clicks also produce 
a variety of results with certain icons, 
such as the zoom icon, when each 
additional click increases or 
decreases the magnification of the 



Ornl***: 



Place 



The symmetry lool Is the lass) useful ol 
DPalnfs tools. Nids It you want 1q ImllalB a 
Spirograph though! 



ci ma Dfomi 



?3T[MES L? JOINT 

CSTIMES 20 POINT 

CSTIMES 25POINT 
CSTIMES 30POINT 



1 00POINT 



DPnInf 6 text handling la far From Imptauiy*. but il least you can now u*a scalable fonta, 



10 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



selected screen area depending on 

which button is pressed. 

Speaking of buttons, most of (he 
icons also produce a different 
response if clicked on with the right 
button, and this response is invari- 
ably to produce a requester where 
you can modify the way that the tool 
works. For example, right click on the 
symmetry icon and a requester 
appears allowing you ic alter the type 
and degree of symmetry. 

The palette resides below the tool 
strip, and depending upon the cur- 
rent screen mode it will display up to 
64 colours at a time. If you're working 
in one of the HAM modes, or 1 £8- 
256 colour mode on an A 1200 or 
40QO, there are arrows beneath the 
palette whi-ch can be used to view 
additional blocks ot 64 colours. 

Running across the top of the 
screen is the menu bar and this natu- 
rally contains many more options. 
Both the menu bar and tool 
strip/palette can be turned on or off 
wilh a single key press as required. 

FIRST IMPRESSIONS 

When the program lirst loads, the 
majority is empty and black, and this 
is your work area, although memory 
permitting you can also use a second 
screen as a scrap area, switching 
between the two by pressing the let- 
ter 'J*. I've never understood why 
Electronic Arts made Ihe default 
paper colour black and the default 
ink lighl grey. My first action is 
always to set 'the default paper to 
white, although this is perhaps a little 
harsh on the eyes. Maybe EA were 
considering more esoteric sensibili- 
ties when they designed the 
program! 

For most of the time that you use 
the program, you'll be using the tools 
that I mentioned earlier, after all, 
that's why they're on the screen in 
the lirst place. The usual assortment 
are available, ranging from freehand 
draw to ellipse and polygon tools. A 
variety of "nib' sizes are available, but 
even if there's not a pre-defined one » 




Although, It doesn't have many image processing Qpl»Dns,yoi can use f>P;ri>jr -r 5 limited leperrairi? lor (jolourising andlinhmi ■-.:•■■■ ■ 




™ Tvp« 



ttr'if.h 



y™ 



Pd-,(irn1ivf 



Pjtlrm 



Mom brush 




Dllh*iv; 
ftandoti |[ 






DPalntUtt t selection of interesting III! wodss wMch can save you hour* of hand texturing. Be 
careful though, they can be Incredibly alow lo use in HAM mode, 



Home on the-Ran 



lis user-friendliness combined with a wall 
denned and Intuitive us*-r-in1ert*cc has helped 
the program to slay at number 1 For eight years, 





I ' l^** l*^ I 



COPY | E« | SPREAD I PICK | DELETE | 
RANGE: r~Hl n 

■ 



FTT^T 






RATE: 

OPafnts range requ«*l*r allows you la set up ranges rot colour cycling and dhheml'gf adusttd lills 



I l M I I I M l I I I I I I I I I 

DITHER- I |-^^H y-1 RAN DOM 



REVERT UNDO 



11 



AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 



Graphics 













It's all very well having an art 
package which can manipulate 
animation, but at the end of the 
day you eventually have to do 
some drawing yourself. How this 
is Tine it you're one of those super 
talented artists who can put 
Leonardo Da Vinci to shame, but 
must ol us are no great shakes 
with a mouse. 

Not la worry, llul doesn't 
mean that you can't still create 
fabulous and completely convinc- 
ing animations. A number of 
companies otter predrawn anirn 
brushes or clips which you can 
animate yoursell. 

Probably the best known of 
these companies is RGB Studios 

who produce an impressive set ol 
animation libraries known collec- 
tively as Real Things. 

There are at least five volumes 
in the Set covering subjects such 
as Humans, Sea Lite and Safari. 
Each set contains a col l eel ion of 
animated brushes as well as a 
variety ol appropriate scenic clip 
art (sea weed and rocks etc lor Ihe 
Sea Lite collection lor example}. 

Also included is a variety ol 
static images which demonstrate 
a number of different artistic 
techniques which are discussed in 
the accompanying instruction 
manuals. 

Most of Ihe animations have 
been digitised Irom footage 
recorded by the Survival team Irom 
Angtia TV. They have then been 
enhanced and retouched by RGB's 
professional artists. 

The images are so good that 
you will even see them appear on 
television from time tu time. 



IY when 



else can 

M.\J IA • •• • 




w lhal you like r yen can always cut out 
a brush and use that as a pen. 
although larger brushes may not 
keep up with your mouse movements 
as well as a standard pen would. 

For the more avant garde artist. 
(here's also an airbrush option with a 
variable spray radius, Obtusely, the 
rate of flow is directly linked to the 
size of the spray: the larger the 
spray, the lower the flow rate. 

There's also a texi tool which you 
can use to add lext to your work. 
Since tne advent of scalable fonts in 
Workbench 2, il's nice to see that D- 
Paini 4 supports Gompugraphic (CG) 



typelaces. This means that provided 
you own trie initial scalable typeface, 
you can infinitely rescale it without 
significant loss ot quality. 

ttfKtJfff 

On (he minus side however, the pro- 
gram's handling of text is as 
rudimentary as it was in the very first 
version. Texi may be plain, bold, italic, 
underline or a combination ol some of 
the above, and is entered in lines 
straight onto the screen. These lines 
cannot be justified or oenlred or textu- 
ally manipulated in any other way- 



One tool that I never did find a 
use for, is the cycle lool which can be 
used to create cyclic or tiled patterns. 
Mind you it's a nice one tor the kids, 
rather like the computer version ol 
Spirograph! 

Apart from the freehand draw and 
magnify tools, the palette is probably 
the most important part ollhe pro- 
gram. Pressing 'p' calls up the palette 
requester which appears as a strip 
along ihe bottom of the screen unlike 
earlier versions of the program. 
Although visually I his requester has 
been jazzed 1 up, the essential parts of 
ii remain unchanged and you can 



use it to mix single colours or create 
entire spreads from one colour 10 
another. One particularly nice feature 
is the ability to use a 'pseudo palette" 
as a tesl bed whilst mixing and 
experimenting with new colours. 

The only major change in the 
palette requester is Ihe absence of 
ihe range options, and this is 
because they've been moved into 
iheir own requester thanks to a 
redesign in the way that ranges are 
defined. A range is a sequence of 
colours used either for a dithered fill 
or for colour cycling. 

To define a range you need only 



» 



12 




D/l 



V 





fi 











90%. 



■EGASTAR 



-GENERATION 4 



AVAILABLE FOR: 

PC & 100% 
COMPATIBLES, 

AMIGA 




Genesia - a game 

of creation 

and power for 

1 to 3 players. 

The owner of a small land, you 
must expand and develop 
your population to become the 
most significant in the world 
of Genesia. In 5 worlds, each 
requiring unique strategies, you 
must manage everything, from 
food and water to employment 
and taxes. 

Will you conquer the lands of 
your 2 opponents, or form an 
alliance with them in an 
attempt to recover the seven 
missing jewels? 

Only with a strong economy, 
powerful army and new 
technology will you fulfil 
yourambitions. 




MICROIDS 



MIND5CAPE 

Mindscape International Ltd., 

Priority House, Charles Avenue, 

Mailings Park, Burgess Hill, 

West Sussex RH15 9PQ 

Tel: 0444 246333 

Fax: 0444 248996 

© 1993 Mieroids. All Rights Reserved 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Graphics 





Using the program's Morph option It's easy lo create an anim brush where one Image is trans- 
formed into another one. 




The program offers you a variety ol useful brush manipulation options. Here I've merely bent the 
image first vertically, than horizontally. [And you look a lot better for it Ma1 - Ed] 



» specify the first and last colours and 
the computer will do its best to work 
out the colours in beiween. 
Alternalively you can specily some of 
the intermediate colours, and this is 



essential if you want your range to 
use illogical transformations. For 
instance in a red to yellow range, 
there is no green, but if you want ihe 

computer to include it, you only need 



to indicate as much in the range 
requester, 

Talking of dithered fills, these pro- 
vide an essential and valuable 
drawing technique which can be 
used either stand alone or in con- 
junction with one ol the filled shape 
tools. 

There are eight di He rent dither 
fill modes all of which can be 
selected from the Fill Type 
requester. By careful selection of 
(he dither mode combined with a 
smoothly graduated colour range, 
you can easily simulate a variety of 
lighting effects which would take 
considerable time lo draw by hand, 
Highlight, for instance, is designed 
to reprasenl the specular lighting 
of a single point light source hitting 
the area being filled. 

Whilst we're in the Fill Type 
requester it's well worth taking a 
look at some of the other options, 
Apart f rorn a straight forward SOtid 
lill, D- Paint is also capable 
of using your current brush 
as a fill pattern. It dees this 
in a variety of ways. The 
simplest of these is the 
From Brush option where 
the current brush Is simply 
duplicated in a tile pattern 
across the surface of the 
area to be filled. The Brush 
option, on the other hand, 
lakes the current brush and 
re-sizes it so that it is only printed 
once en the fill area. Wrap per- 
forms a similar function, but the 
brush is actually distorted far more, 
almost as if it were being 'wrapped' 
around one face of a 3D object. 
The final option is called 
Perspective and it works exactly 
like the From Brush option except 
that the current Perspective menu 
settings are also laken into 
account. 



years, it wasn't until Version 3 that 
Electronic Arts added this option to 
their program. Not much changed 
between versions 3 and 4, although 
a video-style control panel was 
added to make replay of your work 
easier. 

D-Paints animation options can 
be roughly divided into four areas; 
the move requester, anim brushes, 
the Metamorph option and freehand 
animation. Although the mela morph 
option can ceriainly save you the 
most time, it's quite crude in the way 
that it works and is most effectively 
used to represent transformation 
rather than movement. The Move 
requester, on the Other hand, is 
quite powerful. With il, you can 
specify a starting and ending point 
for a brush, as well as the number of 
frames it takes to move from one to 
the other and the program will auto- 
matically calculate the intermediate 
frames for you. It is capable of mov- 



_j Brush 
.^J Brush 

il Cyclic 




EuHn: 

Gemot; 



Direction: 

13 ^J 



Pr**vimv 



-EL 



**" 



|»Q*J 



S*u« jC»fic<i 



A very important part of using 
brushes in D-Paint is the Brush 
menu which contains a host ol 
options lor altering the appearance ol 
a brush. They mean that you can 
pick up pari of a picture as a brush, 
experiment with a variety of modifica- 
tions before stamping Ihe brush back 
down again anywhere you like. 
Among the more interesiing options 
contained in this menu are Rotate,. 
Shear, Stretch, Bend and 
Metamorph. The latter option particu- 
larly, is of great significance because 
it allows you to transform one into 
another over a user-definable num- 
ber of frames, This in turn leads onto 
one of the program's most popular 
features: animation. 

Although rival paint packages had 
included limited options for some 



HI 1- 


- 


4 


* 


\<r 


► 


Eta 


m 


* 


- 


-*• 


9 




2 


P 


H 


S 



The Control Panel oilers you video-deck style controls to manipulate and replay your animation. 



Tnt Maya raqu'ttttr allow* you to automate in* 
anmatlon of bruthet- 



ing and rotating a brush in all three 
planes, x, y and z, and it can even 
use a process called Ease to create 
a graduated increase or decrease in 
the speed at which an object moves; 
ideal for simulating gravity! 

In itself the move requester is 
quite powerful but it really 
becomes very impressive when 
used with an Anim brush. As 
you've probably worked out, an 
anim brush is an animated brush. 
These can eilher be picked up from 
an animation you"ve creeled, or 
loaded from disk. If you use an 
anim brush in conjunction with the 
Move requester, each consecutive 
frame of movement also utilises 
another frame in the anim brush 
sequence. This means that you 
could use an anim brush ol some- 
body walking and with the move 
requester move from one side of 
the screen lo the other so that 
when the animation was replayed, 
the animated character genuinely 
appears to walk across the screen. 
Of course you may have lo creale 
the initial anim brush, but once cre- 
ated it can be reused as often as 
you like. 

When il comes to creating 
detailed animations there are 
times when you'll simply have to 
create the Objects frame by frame, 
pixel by pixel. This can be a very 
time consuming business flipping 
from frame to frame to check that 
the current frame has moved by 
just the right amount, To help you 
with Ihis, D-Paint features an 




Graphics 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



From Small 
Beginnings... 




Thif very first version at OPaitit, compart* with King Tirt semen, wont on sate in IMS, *nd mm 
ynivarsa.1 ipproviL 

Although Ihey are now (he biggest home snllwara publisher in lire world, Elecirnoic Ms 
had the same 5 n»all beginnings as any other company. 11 was founded In 19B2 by a young 
hots hat called Trip HnwKms. Having worked as Director of Marketing lor Apple Computers 
Inc., Trig set up EA lo satisfy what lie taw as a newly emerging need for Jiome entertainment 
and creativity software. His vision was obviously right an the mark: because in its firs) year Ihe 
company grew to employ lifty people. 

Electronic Arts was in Inllitentiai 
player in Ihe early Amiga market and they 
have maintained iheir close Commndore 
_ links to the present day. 

AlHiough their global he ad Quarters are 
I at San Mateo in California, the company 
1 opened a European division in 1 987, and 

now has allir.es in America, England . 
\ Japan, Australia, France and Germany, 
l From their lirsl ever release, a game 
i called Pintail Construction Kit. Ihe com- 
' pany has released more than SSD 
separate lilies which have been dupli- 
cated on cassette, disk, cartridge and 
CD ROM. Their current titles appear ii 
seven dill Brent languages. 

Qetuxe Faint 1 was released in 
November 1995 and met with universal 
acclaim selling la at least 5D% of AIL 
Amiga owners at Ihe lime, the highest mar- 
ket penetralia n at any commercial Amiga product before or since. 
Ir» 1991 Trip- Hawkins resigned his position as President and went off to establish the 3D0 
company, a firm dedicated lotne creation ol a universal CO based machine lor running enler- 
taiiimenl and multimedia software. The result of his labours was unleashed on Ihe world In 
October 1993 in Ihe form of the aptly named 3 DO, a $7DQ CD games console. 

In eleven years Electronic Arts has won more than 3 DO awards lor excellence Irom juries 
across lite world. At the end ol 1992 Ihe company was worth over t BO million dollars and it has 
shown a profit tor every one nl ihe lasl eighl years. 





A BIT Of HISTORY 

Deluxe Feint is (he most popular art package the Amiga has ever seen, and has been around 
sines 1945. It ua$ designed and written by Dan Silva. a programmer who began his career 
wiling soltwars to simulate robotics. 

After working tor Xerox and Lucaslilm, Pan returned to Here* and designed Doodle, a black 
and white paint program for the Xerox Dandelion computer. 

Dan joined Electronic Arts in 1983 by which lime he already had a clear idea ol Ihe way 
ait arl package should function. Bearing litis in mind ho started work on Prism, an art pack- 
age originally intended as an in-house development tool. As Prism became more and more 
complex, il was clear thai there was a mass market appeal for it. and in 1965 Deluxe Paint 
was released. 

Dan eventually went an to wrlle a further two versions of the program before handing over 
Ihe manlle ol responsibility to Lee Tarran who wrote version 4. 



******* 



Dar> SJhvt, the ma n an d Hit! animation. He's Ihe brains -behind Deluxe Paint, 



The ptoqttm otfih* ths baat perspective option* «f ill Ihe painl packages feviawtfll hat*. This 
effect look less thin two minutes Id create by simply applying perspective to a brush then select- 
ing Iha perspective Till mode lo repeal II all aver the screen. 



option called Light bo* and this is 
exactly the same as onion skin 
techniques used by commercial 
anirnalors. It simply means that you 
can faintly see the last one or two 
frames on the current screen. 
Although they don'i leave any 
impression, they can be used as 
templates when designing further 
frames. 

CONCLUSION 

Deluxe Paint 4 was the first paint 
package to include AGA support, 
and is still the best known art pack- 
age in the world. It's capable of 
importing 24-bit graphics, and on 
an AG A machine such as the 
A 1200, you can view and edit pic- 



tures in up to 256,000 colours at 
resolutions up to 1280x512 pixels, 
higher if you use the overscan 
modes. 

The program's selection of tools 
still compares very favourably with 
newer programs, although in the 
HAM modes especially, the pro- 
gram is agonizingly slaw to use, 
and screen updates can take min- 
utes or more, especially when 
performing blending and re-map- 
ping operations. 

I still use the program regularly, 
but Onfy in conjunction with other 
paint packagers. It is still a valuable 
tool, but there are an increasing 
number of very 
attractive rivals, 




And the Future... I 



Deluxe Paint 4AGA is now being 'given away free as pan ol Commodore's Desktop Dynamite 
At ZDO Bundle, so- a whol e n ew gen eral«o n nl Am i p owners will rje 1 1 he h en elil of the pro- 
gram. Based on their pasl record, il is safe lo assume that it won't he tong helrjre Electronic 
Arts release a new version, and in lad Iti ey'ire jusl announced plans to unveil version 5 in Ihe 
first quarter D.MM4. 

The program Mill he designed and programmed by Lee Taran. who also wrote version 4 
Although no iealures list has yel been finalised. Electronic Arts recently invited a whole 
hunch ol the industry's foremost journalists and art users to a brainstorming conference 
where ideas lor version 5 were thrashed over for a day. 

As home video production and animation becomes increasingly papular, it's safe lo 
assume lhal Ihe nert version at Ihe program wilt include enhancements lo trie animalion sys- 
tem and will almost certainly be optimised so that it runs faster 



19 




Krisalis Software Ltd., Teque House, Masons yard, Downs Row, Moorgale, fl other ham, 560 3HD. Tel: 0709 379990 Fax: 0709 368403 



IF 



; 



i rr 





raphics 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 



iisance 



i 



• 




- 081 543 3500 



Over the past seven years new 

art packages have come and 

gone, but apart from D- Paint 

none has stood the test of time. 

Brilliance is a new package 

which looks as if it might be 

around for a while to come... 



Deluxe Pain! has stayed at the 
lop of the heap for two main 
reasons: its specifications 
and its 'feel'. Many programs 
have duplicated its features, and 
some, especially HAM based pro- 
grams, have even exceeded them. 
However, it's the tenuous area of 
'feel' thai rival programs have been 
unable to emulate. Mot only is 0* 
Paint extremely stable (in fact il has 
never crashed on me so far as I can 
remember), but being l he first art 
program that 99% of us encounter, 
we naturally compare everything 



else we use lo it. It's only with the 

release version 4 that Deluxe Paint 
finally lost some of that wonderfully 
(unclional and user-friendly feel thai 
has been its trademark. 



§A S C T £ 



B IN THE 



Brilliance lealureB none of Ihe traditional menus 
Found in oltior painl packageE. 



Digital Creations have obviously 
done their homework because just 
when O-Paint is at its most vulnera- 
ble, they release a program which 
seems as if it has been designed for 
the future rather than upgrade ri 
from the past. 

Rather than simply cloning D- 
Paint, they have redesigned their 
program from scraich. its apparent 
that they've spent a long time study- 
ing what a user wants out of an art 
package, and they've taken quite a 
radical approach to their program' s 
user interface. 

Brilliance has no menu bars at 
the lop of the screen, instead virtu- 
ally everything is pictographies I ly 
represented by a series of icons 
which are contained in a tool bar 
that runs along the bottom of the 
screen. Behind these icons lie 



» 



Dongle Ding Dong 



Al neatly £200. nobody could accuse Brilliance of being a cut pice program, in tact it's more 
than twice the price at 0-faint. Mind you f it's 3 paler the price ol TVPaialso price is 
clearly a relative painl. 

Anyway, Digital Creations naturally want to prated their two year development invest- 
ment by sailing as many copies as possible. There are two ways to achieve Ihis: Ihe lirsl is to 
make as many people want Id buy the software as they can. The second is to make sure that 
those people can't obtain a working pirate version tor the price of a couple oF disks. 

There have been endless mile rent attempts to combal She problem nl piracy, but one ol 
the mosl successful Is Ihe use of a device known as a dangle. A dongle is a small plug that 
connects in Ihe joystick port of (tie computer. II may contain a tiny chip or may simply have 
some al its wires crossed internally, the point is it alters the response ol Ihe joystick part. 
The first Ihino that a dangle protected piece ol software does is to check lhal the dongle is 
plugged in. II it isn't then the software generally won't work, The advantage ol this system is 
that me disks on which Ihe software Is. provided, can be left completely unprotected, so the 
legitimate user can make as many hack-up copies as he requires. 

The disadvantage is lhal the user must always have Itiedonole available In order lo load 
lire software. This can be inconvenient when it's Hie only piece ol software that uses dongle 
priitediiin. but il you have several such programs,, il can ne infuriating as the computer must 
be switched off in order to swilch dongles. 

However, ts worth noting that Electronic Arts once won a special Software Publishers 
Association award for selling over 100,000 copies ol Deluxe Pakt. Considering the fact thai 
there are over four million Ami gas world-wide, and w% ol those owners also have Deluxe 
Paint, why Is It lhal they never reached 200. ODD official sales? 

01 course you're going: say 'Ah but Delias Paint was given away free will) the Amiga' and 
Ihis is certainly true in Britain and parts ol Europe, Sul al the same time there are a great 
many places where it was never given away, soil leads one lo speculate lo what extent the 
completely unprotected program fell victim In piracy. H'salso worth noting lhal Electronic 
Arts a dd ed manua I protection lo Ihe AG A vers I on 4 of the progra m . so perhaps eve n their 
good will has been stretched loo tar. 

As lor Brilliance, If uses a dangle, which is a bloody nuisance, but as long as pirates 
exist, such measures remain a necessary and effective evil.. . 









IT 



Fl 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Graphics 





Pete and Lee's Bogus Journey 



Tttanks lo the programs ^tipertu stencil a nitons, it's sasy to eut Blinnetils ant ol dub pulure 
and imnofatB them into annlher, In Ihis esiample I starlErt with Ihe picture ol Pels »nd Lee, 
and I setup a sIe null which nnhj included Iheirsfcin ami hair colours. I then overlaid a green 
box on the screen. The juyswere rirotielirjfriim delation whilst the background was not. 
Natura 1 1* the sle Mil was not rtrtl utel|f eiacl so I had to ti rJ T the Image byhard, 

The neri stage wastn load the desert picture onto the spare screen. I Hi en nturnerJto 
Ihe main screen and chose ftemap la ensure that Ihe main charade rs stayed the righl 
colour. All Wiai remained was to pick them up as a brush (leaving the green background 
behind) ihen, returning la Ihe desert scene, I slantped Ihe brush down where I wanted il, 

A h it at anti-aliasing to soften Ihe edges ol the eharacle-rs and valla! Pell and Lee go 
monumenl valley without leaving home! 



» 



dozens, perhaps even hundreds of 
additional options, and these are 
represented by gadgets and icons. 
There's another important differ- 
ence too, the tool bar runs 
horizontally instead of vertically 
across the screen. In actual fact this 
is quite logical because although it 
only appears to occupy a small 
amount of extra space when com- 
pared to other program's vertical 
tool bars,, the screen is tar wider 
than it is high, and this allows you 
to fit far more tools in. 

Furthermore, Ihe tool bar fea- 
tures collapsible sub-menus which 
are called up by clicking on one of 
the icons with the right mouse but- 
ton. The sub-menu then opens 
below the main tool bar end up to 
six of them can be open at the 
same time, one beneath the other in 
Ihe order that they were originally 
opened. Try to open a seventh, and 
one of the earlier ones will close 
automatically, The entire get of 
menus can be instantly collapsed 
behind the tool bar by clicking a sin- 
gle icon, whilst a second click will 
restore the previous menu open 
status. 

As you might expect, the sub- 
menus contain options relevant to 
the icon to which they're attached, 
so opening the Ellipse icon's sub- 



menu calls up a strip that allows 
you to define the way and direction 
that ellipses will be drawn, as well 
as allowing you to rotate Ihe current 
one. 

The loci bar itself contains the 
usual tools found in just about every 
art package going, you know the 
ones: freehand drew, line, arc, rect- 
angle, circle, fill, cut & paste, text 
mode and magnify. There are also 
a selection ol icons which pertain to 
more complicated options such as 
the gradient, draw mode and stencil 
sections, but more aboul those 
later. 

Using Ihe program for the first few 
times is somelhing of a voyage of 
discovery; you know what you 
expect each tool to do, but you're 
never quite sure it it will perform as 
expected or whether it will do some- 
thing whoily original and interesting. 
For example, there's a standard arc 
tool, but click on the arc icon twice 
and you are in Bezier curve mode. 
Bezier mode lets you define com- 
plex bi-direclion curves capable of 
exceeding 360 degrees and even 
changing direction mid-curve. 
Another nice option lies behind the 
Spray Can icon, where you can not 



alter the diameter of the spray 
focus and flow rale too. The 
ion means that you no 
have to watch the spray 
dwindle to nothing as you 
increase its size, whilst 
focus means you don't 
have to use a brush 
where the dots appear at 
complelely even density 
all over. 

For the real power 
user with four or more 
megs of memory, one of 
the most useful features 
of the program, especially 
tor experimental work, is 
its infinite Undo/Redo 
option. This means that 
you can try eflecls safe in 
the knowledge that you 
always undo later it you so 
desire, it, having undone an action, 
you then change your mind again 
it's a simple matter to redo it. Gone 
are the D-Paiitt days when you per- 
form a complex drawing action and 
then accidentally release and re- 
click the mouse button adding one 
extra pixel and removing your ability 
to undo something hideous! 

You can specify the size of the 
undo buffer, so that if you are multi- 



vocabulary il you use the program 

for any length of time. The program 
is far more BAM hungry than any 
other no n- 24-bit art package on the 
market. In fact, to be fair I should 
say that one of the programs is very 
RAM hungry because Brilliance is 
not one product but two. 

The program called Brilliance is 
a register based program that deals 
with all non-HAM screen modes. 
What you see on the screen is 
exactly how the program represents 
your work in memory, so a 6-bil pic- 
ture is stored in memory as a 6-bit 
bit-map. This means that you only 
use as much memory as the visible 
image requires. 

The second program is called 
True Brilliance and its a HAMfTrue 
colour package which represents all 
graphics internally as either 15- or 
24-bit images. Therefore a HAM 
image which might ordinarily only 
require 100k of memory now 
requires as much as 400k. 

At (irsl il may be hard to see why 
you would wanl to store a 1 2-bit 
HAM picture as a 24-bit bit-map, 
especially when you can't even see 
the extra colours anyway. If after a 
few moments thought, you still feel 
that way, then in your case there 




E + £ 



S++E 



BRUSH + [ 



RESET | 



POSITION 
ROTATION 
OPACITY 
■ START 




J END 



POSfPK JY JZ STARTS 

ROT^JK JY JZ END: 

ET j JOPACITY XOYER: 




BRUSH 
RELATE 
JfOSITI" 

ROTflTI 



r GO BA 
JCYCLK 
JASPEC 

J FILL 
J TRAILS 



^ll«H 



tasking it doesn"! occupy too much 
memory. On the subject of buffers, 
the program also uses them to slore 
brushes, animations and screens. 
Again, memory permitting there's 
no limit to the number of screens 
that can be loaded simultaneously; 
ideal when you want to cut and 
paste between more than one 
screen. 

TWICE A5 NICE 

I keep using the phrase 'Memory 
permitting', because it's one lhat 
will quickly be included in your 




Willi excaUoni animation and 
support Eif anirtvbfu&he», 
Britlittpct i* certainly ihe 



SHOW 

Amiga art package- la baal 



The program contains all ttie same animation 
option* ** OPaintE Move i&questar, trul a 
number of new feature* have been added 
including Una Opacllv option which ean be 
used lo fade nsjeets out of view. 



probably isn't much point because 
you're unlikely to have much use for 
24-brt images in any case. 

However there is an ever grow- 
ing number of 24 -bit boards 
available nowadays, and an even 
larger number of applications and 
potential uses for 24-bit images 
ranging from video and TV produc- 
tion to creating magazines and 
posters. Just because you can't 
view a 24-bit image with True 
Brilliance doesn't mean that the 
image wool be extremely useful 
elsewhere, 



18 



Graphics 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 




Undo ! Reset 



Start 
End 



Screen 



Cane e I . 



Th* Adjust nqu»»ter l«t& you set up compli- 
cated animations solely using (ha muuit. 

Because True Brilliance can 
load, save and process 24-bit 
images il is ideal for retouching 
screens created with other pack- 
ages such as Ray Tracers perhaps, 
On AG A machines, the program 
can display these 24- bit screens in 
very high resolutions with as many 
as 256,000 colours on the screen, 
Not a lot compared to a 16,7 million 
colour 24-bit image, but more lhan 
adequate to get a very good idea 
whal the finished picture will look 
like. 

If memory is a problem, you can 
tell True Brilliance to represent 
colours using a 1 5 -bit palette 



start and end positions, defining 
movement and rotation in all three 
planes with the mouse. This means 
thai handicapped people or those 
with a keyboard phobia can at last 
enjoy every feature of the program, 

When it comes to saving your 
animations, there are four possible 
save formats ranging from the 
clunky but D-Painl compatible Qp-5 
format at one extreme, to the ultra 
fast Op-8 long format which allows 
you to animate at television speed. 
You can also save your work as a 
sequence of individual frames, and 
this is the only way to save a true 
24-bil animation. 

Because the program supports 
all AGA palette modes in addition to 




SFAftE SUFFER 

COPY 



MERGE 



BRILLIANCE 



ABOUT.. 



if the program could load OIF and JP£G image form*!*, H would b* ngar~p«d*rf. Still, al Ififlflt it 
can handle 24-bil IFF, nol to manikin four different animation formali, 



instead of a 24-bit one. 

Now these specifications are 
impressive enough already, but 
when you consider that ihe pro- 
gram offers you comprehensive 
animation facilities as well, includ- 
ing lha option to save these in 
24- bit colour too, then the program 
starts to look pretty special. 

D-PAINT INSPIRED 

In fact, it seems that D-Paints. ani- 
mation features provided the 
inspiration for Digital Creations' 
design team. Yet again, l he most 
powerful options are contained in 
Brilliance's equivalent of the Move 
requester, Whereas movements in 
O-Paint are expressed relative to 
the start point. Brilliance takes a dif- 
ferent approach, In (his program 
you simply specify the slarl and end 
point of the object to be moved, as 
well as the degree of rotation (if 
any), that the object should per- 
form. Click Draw and the program 
will automatically calculate all in- 
between frames. 

As with ils rival, you can specify 
the Ease ot a movement (how 
quickly it starts and slops moving). 
The ability lo specify Ease in any of 
the ihree axes individually allows 
you to create curved movement 
paths and is a great boon, 

Equally useful, is the Opacity 
oplion with which you can specify 
how 'solid' Or transparent a brush 
appears. This means thai you can 
create effects where titles and 
objects fade on and off the screen. 

Another really nice and user- 
fnendiy part of Brilliance animation 
options is a section called Adjust, 
This option takes you to a special 
screen where you can manually 
drag the brush to be animated to its 



the ordinary non-AGA modes, its 
colour handling is really exceptional 
and there are many exciting options 
to help you create the most subtle 
of effects. 

T he Draw Made menu offers 
access to many fascinating palette 
modes including Coiourize, Tint, 
Smooth and Negative. These allow 
you perform simpie colour-based 
image processing operations on all 
or some of your picture. 

The Draw Mode options are sup- 
plemented by some of Ihe most 
flexible and intelligent palette selec- 
tion and Range creation sections in 
a graphics package. 

The palette lets you create 
colours using RGB, HSV or CMY 
colour models which means thai 
you can work in Ihe mode most 
appropriate to your finished require- 
ments. 

The Range requester is where 
you set up colour ranges for 
dithered and graduated fills, Not 
only does it let you specify the 
speed and way that colours trans- 
form from one to the other, it even 
provides the opportunity for a real- 
lime preview mode where you can 
see how Ihe finished result will look. 
This option is only possible because 
of the program's incredible speed 
which allows the screen to be 
updated far faster than D-Patnt 4 
could ever dream, of. 

The speed aspect of this pro- 
gram is not to be under-rated 
because as the size of the palette 
increases, the lime taken to calcu- 
late screen updates gels longer, 
and in the case of D-Paint, can 
become a very significant irrilalion 
when you're trying lo work, espe- 
cially in HAM8 mode, 



M BRUSH 



J STRETCH 
a< PATTERN 
J SHAPE 

JKMPECTIUE 



■ eotofi 

TINT 

COLORIZE 

BRIGHTEN 

DARKEN 

STENCIL 



u 



SMOOTH 

SMEflfc 

nye smear 

ftrtNGE 
CYCLE 



JRHNDOM 
DITHER 1 
0ITHER2 
NtiJRTK'E 

JHRIFBRITE 
HOT 



JREFLflCE 




AMOUNT: 



JHORIEQMTfll 
J VERTICAL 
JLIHIRR 
J HIGH LIGHT 
d SPHERICAL 
J RADIAL 

CONFORM 
.JCSMKB 



Brittlanca after* nmr* drawing modes than nil tho- g*h*r packages put together Th** take quite 
a bit of sotting uaad Id though,} 




Mo other pachagR, *v*n on high-end packages lido TVPaint, otters you lr» umi pvwerruJ 
optima lor specifying * colour range and lha way that cataur Iranallioni shnuld work.] 



CONCLUSION 

Brilliance really rj-oes fill many of the 
gaps left by other art packages, it has 
been extremely well designed, and Is 
significantly more powerful lhan other 
offerings. Despite having used U for 
several months now, I still can 'I get 
used to doing EVERYTHING without 
conventional menus, and I wonder if 
the file requester should have been 
left in the more traditional format. 



Nevertheless, Brilliance is signif- 
icantly faster and more powerful 
than anything else on the market in 
a similar price bracket. Much as I 
love Deluxe Paint, it is no longer the 
best package to use, although at 
less than hall the price ol Brilliance 
it still has a place in my collection. 

Any Amiga wilh 2Mb ^^^ 
RAM and 2 floppies or 1 £j*£fa 
floppy and a Hard Drive, X^jfr 



MMHBM^BMI 




Have You Considered...? 
PEGGER 

£711.95 - HOBBYTE COMPUTING - 0727 B56005 

As toe sire ol images liereascs tftaoks to 2d- and even 12-hil graphics, you'll notice Ifial 

hard drives which useiltn seem massive are looking less and less impressive. HeiFnercom- 
m imitations oiler a brilliant solution. 

By now, most people are familiar wilh Ihe concept of JPEG compression, a clever 
method ol reducing the site ol picture files to a lenlh of their original size or less. Psjrperis 
flowing mors lhan a reside nl JPEG compression program, 

The program requires a hard drive in order to run, and once installed, il adds three 
options lo Ihe Tools menu: Snoop, CJPEG and DJPEG. CJPEG stands for Compress JPEG, 



CJPEd aackaround enctii fa hut d 

Mf«u» I Tim* fraiav tmn* [fSTuTU 

lWr~ ju run Jjjl 



]ur> 

Shutdown 



Pr inritv 



»tKH 



Q-a«f 



-£S=££ 



lH»q> ¥t\ 



to CiM»rn> 



| ■.■.; J E»tt«Tfi natch 



Of ■: 



BJS 

I Em 



Directory whT* JF£a ftt« u 



. : ■• ! i ■- '' I 



riT 



Th« two m*ln parta otth* P-egger program will eompreaa arvd docflnvpi 1 '*** any graphics 
IIHj ttflitg JPtfl ecmpne»»ion, Th*y »rill trvan perform two op«* «li*n* imultaiMoualy!] 






whilst DJPEG stands lor Decompress JPEG. Hyatt select either option the y will oiler you a 
requester from which you can select Ihe Image to be de/compressed. Having specified Ihe 
compression ratio If your reducing an image. Ihe program will go ahead and perform the 
necessary conversion. II you're uncompressing, you will also he given Ihe option to select 
smoothing, which can remove pliellatlon aff eels f rem images stored al less than 75% qual- 
ity. PejfleroPlsrsyou a hatch mode to perlorm de/compressioo upon multiple files in one 
go. 2nd il also supports ARch lor lully aula mated integration into your working environ- 
ment. One clever thing ahoul the program Is the lactfhaf you can even compress and 
decompress two separate images simultaneously! 

Snoop is perhaps Ihe nicest part ol the program IhDugh. It lelsyou run Peggetw a per- 
mainenf background task whkti scans any specified directories and invisibly patches use IF 
into all imago load and save actions periormad in those directories This means lha! you 
could automatically tall Ihe program to scan your D-Painl saves drawer, and compress 
every picture you store there. Baiter yet, it could he used o compress the output ot a ray 
tracing program as it renders an animation. 

CONCLUSION 

Although it's not eiactly a give away price. Pegger Is absolutely invaluable for people who 
work I n graphics . « spe c iaily if you use a I ol of 24- tail images. II Is extremely easy to use and 
worked seamlessly. A very innovative a nd us elu I graphics Codt. i ^ aa f a T|>A 

Any Amiga with Kickstarl 2.0 or higher and a Hard Drive, Kfa/jtfp 



1B 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 GraphlCS 



» 



PERSONAL PAINT 

£45.99 - Micropace • 0753 551888 



In a graphics market dominated 
by highly sophisticated paint 
packages, you might think that 
one which doesn't even support 
HAM mode might be doomed. Not 
so says Personal Paint,.. 

With, paint packages ever 
increasing in price, one which 
costs less lhan £50 is a pleasant 
enough surprise in itself, but 
when that package stands up 
favourably against the big boys 
then It's got to be worth taking 
notice. 

Persona/ Paint (PPsinf) has 
been written by Cloanto in Italy, 
and as a paint package it is more 
lhan adequate provided you don't 
need to use any of the HAM 
modes. As an image processing 
and formats conversion tool, the 
program stands head and shoul- 
ders above the other two. 

Like Brilliance, PPainfs tools 
seem to take the besl of D- Paints 
original ideas, whilst addling to 
them wholly unique features 
which improve them. 



As usual, you'll find stuff like 
freehand and line draw modes- in 
addition to polygon, ellipse and 
rectangle lools. There's even a 
bezier curve option, which inci- 
dentally is considerably easier to 
use than Brilliance's version. 

FLEXI-FILL 

Click on the Fill icon with the right 
mouse button and you II find that 



N~ I Ed" I ■»'■'- I 



Blur Hllh 
■ Una liv 
Dirk Yrrlin*! Lh «J'Hit 

Dltfvrr lUii^lhttcl 1U L«™1« 

llill»-. CluiH>r,t«Lj 5t-L.»vtU 

tuthm Hlu^lDotlJ rW\ I ™li 

ItillM-i OisprOn**! 17-LfVtll 

Ed«* Lh»lrL-t 
EriibiiSS Hivh 

Ll«ht-D«rk OfclHyi* lir»m»nt 



I 



F-6 Error Diffusion: 



t 



PrMHd I Eiilt I Cmm«I j 



PPainr* fleKible 'ill options hi ofi» ol Ita 
grciiicat strengths. 



the options offered are somewhat 
different to the D-Paint way ot 
working, and are extremely useful 
when working with a limited 
palette. At first glance Ihe fill 
options appear to be much Ihe 
same as those in any other pack- 
age: solid, gradient, and brush 
fills, but then you might notice 
that although the brush till mode 
works much as it does in other 
programs, the fact that you can 
choose from any of nine brushes 
is a great boon. Basically when- 
ever you define a new brush, you 
can opt to store it in any ot the 
nine RAM spaces for use in the? 
current session. This means that 
when you're performing opera- 
tions requiring multiple brushes, 
rather lhan wasting time loading 
them from d<sk, you can simply 
select one ot up to nine stored in 
RAM, 

As for ihe other fill options, 
gradient lets you perform a 
dithered fill from one colour to 
anolher using what's known as an 
Ordered dilher paltern. This 
means that rather lhan actually 
using different colours to repre- 
senl ihe graduation from one 
colour to another, a series of 
increasingly dense dither patterns 
are created using just ihe ink and 




ORIGINAL 



BLUR HIGH 



* *■#■ 



■ * j t * Ah. j 









iS&^ 



DITHER CLUSTD0TS3 




DITHER FLOYD-STEINBERG 



Area Settings 



Fill Type: CM Pattern 




[D II] HE El El HE 



Proceed 



lancet 



Abtrvs: PPatnt cHafs a gMd selection or fill 
lypea,, Including a pertenlaga jradii^ni Pill 
whicn 16 ideal when you're working wllh a lim- 
ited p-alaHc 



Ihe result ol using jusl sorr* ft Personal 
Paint s numerous filters. You can even define 
your own, 




DARKEN 2 5% 



EDGE DETECT 



• J. i 




EMBOSS HIGH 



LIGHTEN 25% 



NEGATIVE 



*m 





ap- ■■ .'BM Sf -.j 



Typo: f>| Corr^ilut'iin | 



RANDOMISE HIGH 



RISE HIGH 






I=~ 


|fl 


Jo 


le 


la 
lit 

P 


IB 


|B 


la 

l L| 
1" 


15_ 

IB 
1" 


n 

F 


in 


F~ 


|o 


|. 


!» 


h 



TEXTURE 



20 



Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 



paper colours. The advantage of 
this system is that the apparent 
number of colours greatly 
exceeds Ihe actual number in the 
palette, especially when working 
in high resolution screen modes. 
This means that if you don't have 
much memory, or you don't own 
an AQA Amiga, you can still cre- 
ate colourful images, 

Personal Paint also offers you 
ordered pattern fills. Again these 
simply fill Ihe selected area using 
a single coloured ink and a prede- 
fined pattern. If memory is no 
problem, or you have a large 
palette, PPaint does of course 
offer the ordinary dithered fill 
modes as well. You know, gradu- 
ated tills which blend from one 
colour to another, 

Compared to the other major 
packages reviewed here, this pro- 
gram's dithered fills are quite 
tame, with nerve of the directional 
or highlighting fills on offer. 

mSBSSk 

The single greatest feature c-f this 
program is its Filter Selection 
menu. This menu contains a vari- 
ety of filters which can be applied 
either to the current brush or 
s sleeted pads of the screen. 
These filters perform a variety of 
functions ranging from the mun- 
dane such as Lighten or 
Negative, lo the bizarre such as 
Texture or Waiercolour. Although 
I've seen options like these 
accompanying PC programs and 
software designed specifically for 
use with a 24-bit board, I've never 
seen them on budget software 
before. Belter yet, you can even 
define your own filters to perform » 



With a littler patience and eHort rt'B poaoiWf la 
crnl* quili dunning imago using PPaint f 

powerful dritwiiiq tOOl*. 




What about...? 

PHOTON PAINT 2 

£19.99 - SOFTWARE BUSINESS - 04110496497 





.11 »p«t T31 



■ • 


IS ' 


0\ 




! 


& A- 



If you wml to stimulate your artistic streak lor less than Uie 

price of a game, then Photon Paint 2 represent remarkably 
good value. 

Back in Itie days when B-Paiitl was only an version 2, there 
wore two distinctly separate paths gf develop mem in Itie paint 
software market; there were the HAM packages and mere were 
the non-HAM ones. Al the time, there were nu packages. Ihat 
supp orled tiuth sets of screen modes. B-Paiot. emerged as the 
winner ill that bailie because ma si people disliked the extra 
Effort Itial's required to work in HAM made. However, in many 
respects Photon Paint beat the pants off D Paint in terms g| 
features-. 

At the lime Micro Illusions were market leaders., and ffielr 
Photon PaM 2 saHware was as good as you could gal. It had 
the same aid drawing tools, but its real power lay hidden away 
in its menus. 

The FG and BG Mode menus contain a significant number 
at colour processing options which allow yon to perform 
sophisticated oolounsine and retouching operations. The Use HI 
an d Use H & S opti on s ca n be used to a Iter Ihe colour b ias ol an 
entire picture I to change it from night to day. or to suggest ihe 
glow ol firelight ror example}. The mode menu also contains 
the Rub Through Option which can be used In rub the surface hum Ihe current screen so thai the spare screen shows through. Another inter- 
esting option Is Panto which allows you to create an onset so that when you drew, part ol the screen from elsewhere is copied to the current 
cursor position. 

One of the most interesting options In a truly feature packed program Is called Wrap. This lets you wrap the current brush around a num- 
ber of pre defined 3D objects Including spheres, cones and cubes. You can even freehand detine Ihe outline of a shape around which Ihe 
brush should be wrapped. 

The program also supports animation, although 
it's very rudimentary by today's standards, and 
requires lots of RAM, 








CONCLUSION 

If D-Paltii or Brilliance managed to incorporate some 
ol Photon Paints unusual options, you'd see the mosl 
incredible art pre gram imaginable. It's features are 
just way ahead ol Iheir time. It's a pity Ihat they can 
on ly be ap plie d to H AM m nde i ma ges , with a 1 1 the 
colour problems that implies. Nevertheless, at CI 9.99 
Photon Paint ?is an absolute steal, and If you are 
remoter? serious about your computer graphics, this 
is brie that you Should buy juSl to add to your arsenal 
ol drawing tools. 
Compatible: Any Amiga with 1Mb HAM 

Using the Rub Through option you can literal ly rub 
awny the surfwc ol th» mvn icrroi to reveal lh« 
spire cn«. 



21 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 Graph.CS 



» specific functions which you may 
require. These filters justify the 
program's expense purely as an 
image processing tool, tel alone 
as a paint package. 

If you have access to a lot of 
MAC or PC images, you'll he 
pleased to know that PPaint can 
load and save industry standard 
PCX and GIF format screens as 
well as 2- to 24-bit IFF and code 
prelected IFF tiles. 

Vup, you read lhat right, I did 
say code protected IFFs. For 
some reason Cloanto's designers 
feel that it's important to be able 
to protect your graphics Irom pry- 
ing eyes, so they added the 
option to password proteel every 
screen as you save it! Paranoid 
perhaps, hut I suppose it you 
were a graphic artist then such an 
oplion might be useful. 

In fact, to a certain extent the 
program feels as if it has been 
designed as a programmer's tool. 
For starters the aclual program 



code is very compact, in fact it 

only occupies 210K. This means 
that il can be used comfortably 
even on a 51 2K machine. Of 
course the greatest give away is 
the 'Save as C Source' picture 
save option 

CONCLUSION 

Persons! Paint is above all a fun 
program. Its ability to load and 
save all the common file formats 
makes it ideal for cross-platform 
graphics, although its inability to 
display and save either of the 
HAM formats is rather inconve- 
nient. Even so. for only £46. the 
program is cheap enough to add 
lo your collection simply for lis 
Filter effects. Weil worth a look, 
bui it doesn't realty have what it 
takes to be your only ^^^^ 
an package. IeX^ES 

Compatible: Any Aftiiga^**^ 
with 1Mb RAM 



An example of iwM of Pfioton Ptlnfh excellent FG mod* iflfcclei 




What Is HAM Mode... ? 










IWttJi 

Tunnipseed I 



It s impassible to read any serious articles on Amiga graphics wlthftul Ihe subject ul ils HAM 
mode being raised al least once, Reading between the lines you'd be forgiven lor getting 
confuse d; nn the one hand HAM is the super serge n mode that the A6A machines display a 
dn?jlinq 255.000 colours al u'ice. bul on the nihil tianr. NAM is ai &u In slew "ur panea nl 
causes fringing problems. Suwhal is il about HAM? Does it have personality problems? 
Haw did il come lo be Ihe Jekyll and Hyde of the Amiga graphics world? 

It's actually quite simple, and derives Imm a clever piece of hardtoare design which per- 
mits lar mare colours on screen than Ihe number nl bil-p lanes should allow. IF you've read 
the section on hil-planes earlier in Ih is mauajine. you'll know ibal ihe numher nl bil-planes 
used determines the maxim urn number of colours lhat can he displayed al one lime. Each 
time you add one extra nil-plane, yau double the number of potential colour*. 

Due to hardware design restriction? Ihe pre-AGA Amigas were only. able to recognise 1 
five true bit-planes which gave a mad mum of 32 possible colours {2x2t2*Zx2*32), 
Remember each bit-plane has two passible stales, and adding an exlra one Increases Ihe 
total palette by a power of two. 

Now we come to Ihe clever oil: when you use HAM mode, rather than refer Id the full 
RGB value at a pixel, the computer restricts ils colour so that it can only diller Irom it prede- 
cessor {Ihe pixel on its I eft I hy one colour component, red. green OR blue 1 . This means thai 
instead al having lo store each pixel's lull RGB values, only the mediheation lo one ol those 
values needs 1d be recorded thus occupying less bit-planes than would otherwise be 



The only trouble with this system arises when you wis Mo place two colours adjacent to 
each other which are different in alt three RUB components. Basically, you can't because it 
would require three pixels ol distance to transform from one col qui to the other, and this 
often causes an undesirable smear effect known as Iringjing. Obviously lithe pixels only dif- 
fer hy iwd com on nents, then It will only require two steps to transform tram one colour to 
another. 

Furthermore, because Ihe colour ol every pi tel on Ihe screen is dependant upon Ihe 
colour of two others, il requires far mare lime to redraw the screen in Ihis mode, matting il 
virtually Impossible to use lor any sort of last action, especially games. 

Even predefined animation can he difficult in HAM made because you're never quite 
sure what fri ng i ng effects may occur as you move pa Ms u f Ihe screen. 



Line Settings 



Line- Type: |&| Color Pattern 



Pattern : 



First Row of Brush # 



HGDII]HQDIjD[I][£][Z] 




One of (he unique ihings about Personal paint Is EN* way 1n*l any frruah irom the nine 
brutn bulfers can alio be used as i drawing torn. 



22 



Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 



PAINT PACKAGE FEATURES COMPARISON 




DPAINT4 


BRILLIANCE 


PERSONAL PAINT 


PRICE 


99.99 


194.95 


46.95 


SPEED 


SLOW 


FAST 


GOOD 


MEMORY NEEDED 


1MB 


2MB 


1MB 


MANUAL 


EXCELLENT 


ADEQUATE 


DULL 


INTERFACE DESIGN 


ADEQUATE 


GOOD 


GOOD 


OVERALL DESIGN 


GOOD 


EXCELLENT 


MODERATE 


PALETTE SELECTION 


AVERAGE 


VERY GOOD 


GOOD 


# OF DRAWING TOOLS 


ABOVE AVERAGE 


VERY MANY 


AVERAGE 


# OF FILL TYPES 


GOOD 


EXCELLENT 


GOOD 


GRADIENT DITHERING 


GOOD 


EXCELLENT 


VERY GOOD 


STENCIL MODES 


VERY GOOD 


EXCELLENT 


GOOD 


HAM SCREEN MODES? 


YES 


YES 


NO 


NON-HAM MODES? 


YES 


YES 


YES 


ASA SCREEN MOOES? 


YES 


YES 


YES 


IMAGE PROCESSING 


MINIMAL 


MINIMAL 


SUPERB 


LOAD/SAVE OPTIONS 


ADEQUATE/POOR 


ADEQUATE/ADEQUATE 


VERY GOOD 


24-BIT LOAD/SAVE 


YES/NO 


YES/YES 


YES/NO 


MAGNIFY OPTION 


ADEQUATE 


VERY GOOD 


ADEQUATE 


PERSPECTIVE 


EXCELLENT 


ADEQUATE 


NO 


MULTIPLE UNDO/REDO 


NO 


YES 


NO 


# OF BRUSHES 


2 


8 


9 


I OF SPARE SCREENS 


1 


MAMIE 


1 


BRUSH HANDLING 


GOOD 


SUPERB 


VERY GOOD 


TEXT HANDLING 


POOR 


ADEQUATE 


VERY GOOD 


ANIMATION? 


YES 


YES 


NO 


ANIMATION OPTIONS 


OK 


VERY GOOD 


NONE 


ANIMBRUSH SUPPORT 


YES 


YES 


NO 


ONION SKIN 


YES 


NO 


NO 


MQRPHING 


YES 


NO 


NO 


PRINTING 


GOOD 


POOR 


OK 


GRAPHICS PAD 


YES 


NO 


NO 



23 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 Graph.CS 



IMAGE PROCESSING 



As the Amiga is exploited more and more fre- 
quently as a. video production tool, software 
production tools have also become increasingly 
significant. Image Processing is one area that has 
seen particular growth over the past year, and a vari- 
ety of packages have appeared io fill what vacancies 
there may have been in this already lively field, 

Thanks to image processing tools, complex and 
seamless modifications can be made to images in min- 
utes, whereas previously ihese same processes would 
have required hours of hand-drawn work. 



Over the last few years, image processing programs have come into 
their own. So, if you want to bend it, warp it or generally contort your 
pictures into any shape or form, then climb en-hoard the image pro- 
cessing bandwagon... 



ART DEPARTMENT 




£199.99 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 




Operators 



Tuirl 



Execute Op 



nage Information 

Color and Rendered 
W: 784 H; 588 



Screen Controls 



Lou Res Oscan 



Co lors 




ADPrty'a somewhat spartan main screen ia likely to cause you culture shock ill you're only uwd 
Id art packages. 



In the world of Amiga image pro- 
cessing, ASDG's Art Department 
Professional has ruled the roost 
since the very first version was 
released- Let's see what they have to 
crow about. 

Whereas paint packages provide 
you with the tools needed to create 
images from scratch, image process- 
ing software is primarily concerned 
with manipulating existing images, 
Art Department consists of three 
basic sections: loaders and savers, 
image processing and display options. 



mm 



RMATS 



Whenever you load an image, you 

can specify the file formal it's stored 
in, An appropriate loader module will 
then bo used to ensure lhal the pic- 
ture loads correctly, if you"re imol sure 
of the exact format a screen is stored 

34 



in : the Universal module will' attempt 
to work out the best load format. 
When you've finished working on an 
image, you can also specify the save 
formal, and again the appropriate 
saver module will be automatically 
activated by the program. 

There are a number of advan- 
tages to using this modular approach 
to file handling. For starters, the 
overall program size is kept to a mini- 
mum because only the current load 
or save module needs to be stored in 
RAM. This is an extremely important 
point because whenever you load a 
image, it is converted into ADPr&s 
internal ?4-bit format 24-bit images 
are notoriously RAM hungry, and 
ADPro is far from economical in its 
management of memory. You'll need 
a minimum of two megs, but four or 
more are recommended by ASOG. I 
have six megs on rny A1200 and I 



constantly run out. ASDG do suggest 
a number of memory saving tech- 
niques, the most useful of which is 
the ability to disable what they call 
Enhanced Palette Support. In other 
words, images will no longer be 
manipulated in 24-bit colour. On pre- 
AGA machines this is an acceptable 
option but on the A 1200 and A40O0, 
colour accuracy will be forfeited, and 
the resulting image will suffer slightly 
as a result. 

Another plus feature of the modu- 
lar approach to file handling is that 
the program never needs lo become 
out of date- If a new image format 
appears on the market, ASDG simply 
develop new loader and saver mod- 
ules and the program is kept bang up 
to date. The program comes with 28 
loaders and 19 savers ranging from 
Ihe common ones such as IFF, GIF, 
HAM-E, JPEG and TIFF to the exotic 
and rarely used stuff like QRT, BMP, 
BACKLINE and ALPHA 

Unless you own a graphics board, 
you'll probably use the IFF, GIF and 
JPEG modules ihe most often. The 
JPEG module is particularly useful 
because it provides a method of com- 
pressing pictures, especially 24-bit 
images, to a fraction of their original 
size. Although JPEG compression is 
only really suited to non-hand drawn 
images, the results can be stunning 
yielding compression rates of up to 
90% in some cases. 

Once you've actually got an image 
into the program, there are a variely of 
operators that can be used to perform 
changes on it. Again, these operators 



Crop_ Triage 

Crop_V i sua I 

DCTV 

Def ine_Px l_Hspect 



_P ixe I 

Dynan ic_Range 

Gray_To_Co lor 

Halve 

Hon izontaLFt ip 

Co I lapse 



MRU 



^ I 



Rese 



Accept Rnd Operate 



Accept Cancel 



AOPro's operator* «ra used to perform a vari- 
ety of affects upon your linages, 

are supplied in a modular format, so 
new ones can be added as and when 
they're developed. 

TIME TO OPERATE 

For pro and semi-pro users the oper- 
ators are probably the most 
important part of the program. They 
perform a vast range of functions 
ranging from the mundane, to the 
bizarre. In all likelihood, it will be the 
mundane ones such as Scale (which 
re-sizes an image), or colour to grey 
which are used the most frequently. 



Enn wtisrt using 24-bll lit>a,gr.i, ADPro shows 
you a grey scale preview screen so that you 
can eel up th* operation. 




Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 



Have you 

considered...? 

PROFESSIONAL 
CONVERSION PACK 

-£79.95- MERIDIAN 
DISTRIBUTION -OBI 543 3500 

Although Itie Amiga is well known lor Ms 
superb graphical abilities, liters are 
occasions when you'll need Id' exchange 

data producer! on other computer sys- 
tems. ASDG's Protesslotfaf Conversion 
Pjcflr makes Ihrs job easier... 

ADPro is supplied wilh loader and 
save r modules which will let you 
exchange daia with a variety ol the most 
popular Amiga graphics boards. The pro- 
gram even supports a lew common 
non-Amiga formats such as GIF and 
MacPaint. However, if you want 1o 
wchanoe graphics with the high pow- 
ered commercial systems, this package 
ol additional loader and saver modules 
may be exactly whal you need. 

The pack comes wilh live sets ol 
loader and saver modules: Rendition. 
Sun, Tango, TIFF and X. The Rendition 
format is used by programs such as 
Csiigari, and information saved in litis 
way can also have Alpha channel inlor- 
matloft restored end used to control 
compositing functions. 

The Sun lorntai is user! by the expen- 
sive- graphics workstations, and means 
that your Amiga's output can he inte- 
grated wilh TV sludio graphics. 

CONCLUSION 

The professional conversion pack Is no) 
going lo be a lot ol use to the majority Ol 
ADPfo usErs. .but to a minority ol power 
users it will be essential. 



Needs: ADPro and any 
Amiga capable of running il, 



However, I can'l over-emphasise the 
sheer fun that some of the more 
exotic options ear* give you. 
Operations like twirl which can be 
used tO relate a Section of the: picture 
by any amount, or collapse which 
makes a section of the picture fold in 
en itself. The mere existence oi 
many of the operators is like a shot 
of adrenaline for your creative ego. 

If you're processing an animation, 
the program can automate l he pro- 
cess for you using ARexx. An 
additional program called FRED 
{FFame EDitor) is. also supplied wilri 
the program, and il is this thai is 
used to perform batch operations on 
animations. 

Once you've used the operators, 
you can choose to render the picture 
(e any graphics board that you may 
be using, or simply lo the screen if 
you don't have a board. Among the 
more popular boards thai the pro- 
gram supports, il can output lo 
Firecracker, Impact Vision 24, 
Opalvision, DCTV and HAM-E. It 
also recognises both the AG A 
machines and the earlier Amigas, 
and can output images in all Amiga 
screen modes. 





ADPta's polar 
routine- per- 
forms a radial 

I •■!>■'-' II i<..nli,-n 

op*f»|inn Upon 
.ir iii.icji- -m:l 

Hi site *nd 

local fsuinl can 
be user-defined. 



Have you 
considered.,. I 

PR0C0NTR0L 

£69.95 - MERIDIAN 
DISTRIBUTION - 061 543 3500 

IF you spend a lot of time working with 
multiple images, you may have already 
tried lo use ADPro s AReii control. II 
you'd prefer an easier method ihen 
ProCofttrol is your best bet. 



CONCLUSION 

Arf Department 2. 3 is extremely pow- 
erful and friendly tg use, although 
compared to older image processing 
packages such as Butchsr or 
Pixfnate, it is significantly different to 
won\ with. The reason for this is that 
whereas with (he former programs 
you simply toad an Amiga screen 
and then perform operations upon it. 



all ihe time being able to see what' s 
happening, most of the ADPro stuff 
happens out of sight. Even so, once 
you get used to using it, ADPro really 
is very impressive in its range of abili- 
ties. This is one of those tools that you 
just dont realise how much you need 
il until you own it for a lit- 
tle while Indispensable. 
Compatible: Any Amiga 
with at least 2Mb of Fast RAM 



The program is like a computerised con- 
veyor belt, control ling ill e How ol i mages 
Ihrough Art Department. The program is 
ids ally Suited to batch processing anima- 
tions, and by delinmg non-stationary etiech 
you can even make your own animated 
effects such as motion blur, etc. ProControt 
uses an entirely graphical approach to batch 
handling so there's no complicated or time 
consuming scripts to leant.. 

CONCLUSION 

ProControt is designed to simplify your 
life when processing lots ol images in Art 
Oepartmeol Professional. Although It is 
By no means an inciting producl, it works 
well . and what more can you ask? 
W ee ds: AD Pro an d any A miga capable ol 
running if. fiO% 



» 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 GraphlCS 



IMAGE FX 

£199.95 - SILICA SYSTEMS - 081 309 11 1 1 



» 



■ .I T I BVflHI tILBMJ 



HIMLJ- 




Imtge FX combine* a lop quality image pruwsjor and Hie Format converter wilh e powerful if 

ttuneurial cumbersome 24-bit pain! package. 



Primarily known for their inno- 
vative hardware, it was a little 
surprising to see GVP enter- 
ing I he software market with 
Im&geFX. True lo lh& high stan- 
dards sel by the company, the 
program is an ambitious piece of 
software which is aimed directly al 
the current manXet leader. 

Art Department Pro has gradu- 
ally evolved over a number of years 
tg become the undisputed king of 
the Amiga's image processors. It 
seems a little strange therefore, to 
see total newcomers GVP enter the 
software market with a package that 
aims to topple the giant in a sing la 
blow, Given a moment's reflection 
though, perhaps Image FXwas nol 
Such a bizarre release, after all GVP 
do produce arguably some of the 
best graphics boards available on 
the Amiga. 

ft^1SSs OF 

Image FX is, in fact, several pro- 
grams rather than just one. The first 
and probably last thing that you'll 
encounter are its loader and saver 
modules, Available for jus! about 
every Amiga file format known to 
man, and many which arenl even 
Amiga specific,, the program can be 
used lo transfer files between most 
proprietary boards and file tormals 
including DC TV, HAM-E, GIF, 
JPEG, IFF and loads ol others. 
Alternatively you can use it to con- 
trol an Epson or Sharp scanner 
directly, This latter point is excep- 
tional because ASDG charge over 
$100 for the scanning add-on for 
ADPro. However you choose lo gel 
an image info the program, the 
image data will be immediately con- 
verted into 24-bit formal. 

Having loaded an image, if you 
have a 24- bit board connecied, you 
can immediately render it in the 
maximum number of colours that the 
board is capable of. In practice, 
allhough this is essential for check- 
ing how the finished image will look, 
90% of your lime will be spent star- 
ing at the work screen which 
contains a grey-scale ^presentation 



of your image and ihe tools you 
need lo manipulate it. 

By default the program loads in 
pamt mode. In olher words the tools 
at the bottom of the screen are 
designed primarily for drawing. As a 
paint package the program is rather 
si range to use because you donT 
aclually see whal you're doing in 
colour until you choose the Render 
option from the menu. The screen 
you're working on is displayed as a 
grey scale Image bul can be ren- 
dered in any mode you want, 
chipset permitting... 

The reason that GVP have taken 
this somewhat unusual approach is 
so that you can load and edit 24- bit 
pictures, even without a 24-bit 
graphics board. 

The selection of drawing tools is 



as basic as you could hope to lind, 
but then I suppose the assumption 
is that if you wanted a paint pack- 
age, you'd have bought one in the 
first place. Far more interesting are 
the list of options I hat you can apply 
to a picture after it's been drawn. 

As wilh ADPro, image FX comes 
complete with a large selection of 
operators (more lhan ihe former 
package) and rather than hiding 
them away in little menus, they are 
laid oul on the main Toolbox screen 
ready Hoc use. 

A NEW SURGEON 
IN TOWN 

All of Art Departments operators 
seem to be there as well as a num- 
ber of new ones too. One of the 
more spectacular ones is Wave 
which redraws the picture as if it 
were the surface of a pond which 
has just had a pebble ihrown into it. 
Another nice one is oil transfer 
which supposedly turns the image 
into an oil painting, although I think 
that a water colour would be more 
accurate. 

A great bonus of this program is 
Ihe fact that Cifiemofph is provided 
with it Urea of charge. As ils name 
suggests, Cinemorpfi is a morphing 
program along the lines of Moiph 
Pius. 

Cinemorph can be loaded as a 
stand atone program or via what are 
known within ImageFX as 'hocks'. 
Hooks require ARexx in order lo 
operate and they provide an easy 
way to link up to other more power- 
ful image processing effecls 



modules. 

Using Cinemorph it's possible to 

create animations Such as I hose 
seen in Godley & Creme's 'Cry' 
video, or Michael Jackson's 'Black 
or White' video. 

One of ihe most useful advan- 
tages that ImageFX has over Art 
Department Professional, is its use 
of Virtual Memory on hard drive 
based systems. What this actually 
means is thai the program can use 
your hard drive as memory if you 
run out of 'real' RAM, This is a 
tremendous advantage because it 
means lhat you can use ihe pro- 
gram (or commercial quality image 
conversion where you're dealing 
with huge 24- bit bit-maps. Of 
course, using the disk drive as RAM 
does stow things down a tad, but the 
speed difference is by no means 
unbearable. 

CONCLUSION 

Much as I enjoy using ADPro. I have 
to say thai image FX is better in just 
about every respect. It's easier and 
more logical lo use; the user-inter- 
face is friendlier; it has more 
features; it includes scanner support 
as standard; it includes more opera- 
tors; it has drawing tools; it provides 
you with a constant preview screen 
and it includes morphing in the 
same package. ADPro was superb, 
but FX is better! 

Compatible: Any Amiga with. 3Mb 
RAM and Kick si art 1 .3 or 
higher. Hard Drive 
required for Virtual 
RAM feature. 



<j|k 



Wilh A 'o^e like 1hla, trie legal we could do warn 
cliMiur I his hideous looh> using Ihe image 
manipulation loo-le within- Image FX!11 




Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 




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27 




r,...a soccer simulation that combines 
realism with fast arcade action! 
Check out just some of the many 






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TUCHCf - Select onset the many, easy set up eM7"-W-WCftC$ Opto w DESIGN OJJ? OWW 

WEUW OTMSHNG - Oxjose one of frmee dtffensnt modes for oinet-perfect passing, 

'OME MH fOOTEAtl - fiidtf yp moves qufcWy and tiwfo. Anyone aw too* good, and it you are good |wu"Jr PlAY UW A GfNJUS. 

*SPFC74CULW ■ iorge. SVPEftBLY AMW*UH}ptoyws too* os if ftsy're ready to burst otrfof irtn/r screen? 

TOtiunC - i/oriatore mnddractfon , wba' speed andptfch conditions fhot twify INFLUENCE THE GAME-piay. 

'AC770N HRUII - SetecJ to reptoy *! ertf>er GJMAUDSTAND or TQP-DOIW mode. F maturing FULL VIDEO COWffiOtS ffewrtid, fast forward 
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OCEAN SOFTWARE LIMITED ■ 2 CflSTlF SIHFf r ■ 

GASTIOTEtD ■ MANCHESTER M3 4i2 
TEL: 061 S32 6633. FAX: 061 834 0650 



Graphics amiga buyers guide -94 





MORPH PLUS 

£199.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



In case you haven't watched televi- 
sion in the last year, morphing has 
become big business. Everyone's 
doing it. turning snails into frogs, cars 
into tigers and men into women. Now 
Amiga owners can get in on the ad 
franks to Morph Plus. 

Morph Pius actually consists of 
three separate programs: Morph 
Plus which is Ihe main program, 
Morph which is the part that's 
actually responsible for perform- 
ing the transformations, and 
FRED which is used to process 
entire animations. Whilst Morph 
Plus -can be run as a stand alone 
program, the other two require the 
former to be already running in 
order to work. Alternatively, Morph 
Plus can be accessed via Art 
Department Pro if you own it. 




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Lw (urns, into bushbaby boy wrth a little- help 
•ham i*n W«rp operator, 



The program can be used in 
one of two ways: as a generator 
for animated sequences where 
images are transformed from one 
io another, or as a stand alone 
effects generator, similar to the 
Operators in ADPro. Of course, 
its for the program's animation 
abilities that it has become most 
popular. 



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If you run the pregnm in ee»n|Unc<i[>n with Art 
Department Pro, Morph Pttia t*icm*i even 
mnrr powerful, 



To perform a morph. you'll first need 
to load two images, which will be 
converted into 24-bit data as you do 
so. Naturally, this is extremely RAM 
intensive, and the program requires a 
bare minimum of four megs, although 
eight is recommended, 

These images will be displayed in 
grey scale mode, which means that 
whatever Amiga you're using you can 
al least see representations of the 
images you're working on. Once 
you've loaded the two images, it's 
time to define the motion paths that 
will be used. What this basically 
means is that you must indicate 
which parts of the first picture will 
transform into which parts on the 
second. If you're working with two 
similar subjects (two faces for exam- 
ple} this isn't a particularly difficult 
task, although il is an extremely lime 
consuming, and dare I say, arduous 
one. Things become a bit more com- 
plicated when you're morphing 
between two utterly dissimilar 
objects; a telephone and a rabbit for 
example. Then you need to give 
some care to the relationships and 
movement paths lhat are defined if 
you are lo avoid paths which cross, 
or animations which make your stom- 
ach turn. 

As you've gathered by now, hav- 
ing linked areas of the two pictures, 
you also need to define the direction 
and speed of any transformations. 
You can alter (he speed globally, or 
you can specify the rate at which 
individual points and groups move. 
You can even specify vanable trans- 
formation rates for the same group of 
points. 

Having defined all of this, it's time 
to rer>der the changes. Because this 
can be very time consuming, espe- 
cially in full 24-bit on non-accelerated 
Amigas, you're advised to take 




I 



<0* 



To mwph ana nhjeri into anoltier you first 
need to painstakingly link every point nn the 
two pictures wllh a rnovemenl path. 



What about.,? 

CINEMORPH 

£24.95 -SILICA SYSTEMS 
0813091111 

Included free Willi ImsgeFXat as a vary 
reasonably priced stand alone product, 
Cinsmorph is a direct rival far Morph 
Fltts. 

It uses a complex mesh al lines and 
points lo define the control points and 
relationships in an animation. II used as 
part ol !msf» FX. a few extra options 
such as a magnify mode are available 
However, whichever version ol the pro- 
gram yo-u use, Cinemoipti takes quite a 
while to get id grips with, 

Given Ihe extra ellorl, Cinemorph is 
orally much capable of the same kind ot 
results as Morph Flos although il you can 
altord i| , you're tar getter oil to buy 
ImspsFX and get Cinemorph let free. 
Then you'll have a great Image processor 
as welll 

Compatible: Any Amiga with ^^Wfct 
Hickstart f 3 or higher AND v£^, 
2MB FAST HAH 






** 



advantage of the lower colour resolu- 
lion preview modes, as well as 
working with reduced stza images. 

INPUT OVERLOAD 

To be hones!, the program is more 
than a little intimidating at first, and 
the examples In the manual naturally 
work out far better than your first 
attempts are likely lo. For starters the 
choice of images, as well as their 
position and orientation plays a sig- 
nificant role in the success of the 
finished result. 

As I mentioned earlier, Ihe pro- 
gram can also be used lor single 
frame image processing. It's crystal 
clear lhal the program has come 
from ASDG for not only is the inter- 
face very similar, but its image 
processing operators are the same 
too, although Morph has some extra 
ones that ADPro doesn't. Warp for 
example, can be used to stretch 
parts of an image in the most disturb- 
ing manner, whifsl Ihe perspective 
operator is one of the most friendly 
and accurals ways of moving a two 
dimensional picture into three dimen- 
sions that I've seen. 

CONCLUSION 

There's no doubt lhal Morph Plus is 
one of the most incredible and pow- 
erful graphics processing tools 
available. It contains the most inter- 
esting bits of (Art Departmenrand 
Image FX, although sadly il dbeanl 
include the drawing tools that make 
FX so useful. It's hard to see why 
you'd want to buy ADPro if you 
already awn Morph Plus, after all 
Morph has 'more operators, and per- 
forms metamorphosing animation. 

The program can be rather tough 
to gel to grips with but once you do, 
you're in for a real treat. Definitely 
worth a serious look. 
Any Amiga with 
Kicks tart 2.0 and 4Mb 
Fast RAM. 




A* you cm aee on this magnified preview, 

defining warp pnlti* Iqlll 1hw computet what 
pan -of the screen to mows to which IcciHiun. 






AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 Graptl.CS 



FANTAVISION 

£N/A - HOBBYTE COMPUTING - 0727 856005 



If the thought of getting into profes- 
sional image processing and 
animation gives you the chiils, per- 
haps Fantavi&ion will be more your 
speed. 

Developed as a direct rival for 
Aegis Animator, Faniavssion was 
developed by Brodsrbund in the 
Slates, and was originally distributed 
here in England by Domark. Instead 
of going for the high powered, hi-tech 
approach adopted by Motph Pfus, il 
does a little morphing of Ms own 
using an utterly different technique. 



>nj«l H.l IKflii.i T 




moved around the screen in any way 
you like, but may not be animated in 
any other way. However, the real 
power of the program lies in its ability 
to handle structured drawings consist- 
ing of no more than a series of 
connected points fillerl in by the colour 
of your choice, rather like solid dcl-to- 
dot pictures. 

Although these pictures may 
seem crude, they offer far more flexi- 
bility than other systems, and with 
enough care can create very impres- 
sive animation* indeed. You see the 
whole secret behind this program lies 
in its ability to calculate ihe move- 
ment of objects from one frame to 
another. Here's how it works: you 
start off with a certain shaped object 
in position Q on the screen, Now you 
go to the nexl frame which you 
define as being X seconds in the 



future and you move both the posi- 
tion and shape Of object 0. 
Fantavision provides a number of 
tools to help you do (his, ranging 
from a rotation tool that lets you 
rotate an object around any axis, to a 
re-size and distort tool, There are 
aiso a variety of ol her ways lo 
reshape your object. 

Now. having placed it in its new 
position, you can tell the program to 
calculate the intervening frames. It 
will then move each point in your 
objed to its new locahon at the rate 
specified. Provided you take care no! 
to accidentally cross the movement 
paths of the points over, Fantavishn 
will generate extremely smooth tran- 
sitions from one frame to another, 

LOOK OUT STEVEN! 

Now this in ilsell is exciting enough, 
but when you add to it the ability to 
associate sound samples with each- 
frame, you can soon see how easy it 
could be to create mini movies. In 
fact there are a number of very 
impressive demos supplied with the 



mm* 



A Fttntavi$ion animation is cOfnpnsed 
of several elements: bit-mapped 
scenery (both foreground and back- 
ground), animations (both structured 
and bit-mapped) and sound effects. 

To start wilh, you may load in 
scenery in the form of screens which 
may be in any of the pre-AGA modes 
up to and including HAM. Having 
loaded the background, it's lime to 
define the objiects in your animation 
and l heir starting positions. These 
objects may be D-Painl brushes, or 
slructured drawings. If you choose to 
load D-Patnt brushes, they can be 




The program will work out your animation for you. All you nave to do set up certain key Iramea. 



Project Edit Options Text 




i Film 


■ 


1 


+ 
+ 


| Info 


(Sound 


(Blank 


Clone 


Go! 




you can fidd sound samples lo any frame ol 
animation to give your productions that extra 
fc>i| of r*pli!=rn 

program, including a prehi stone 
scene in which two pterodactyls wing 
their way across the screen, one into 
the distance and! the other horizon- 
tally from left to right. Soon after, a 
long necked dinosaur wanders into 
the field of view, and gracefully 
arches its neck up lo branches of a 
tree where it snatches some leaves 
from a high treetop and munches 
them before gliding off the screen. All 
the while we hear the hum of insects 
and the occasional bird call reinforc- 
ing the realism Of tba Swampland 
scene. 

Talking about the program's 
sound options for a brief momenl, 
you can choose a sample and spec- 
ify its volume and pitch, as well as its 
duration. If (he sample is looped you 
can simply leave it to repeat for the 
duration of ihe frame or animation. 
You can even specify whether the 
sound appears from the left or right 
Speaker, and whether it should have 
an echo, and if so after what time 
period and through which speaker, 
Considering the lact that this is pri- 
marily an animation package, it really 
does handle sound very well indeed, 

When you've created an anima- 
tion, you can save it as a movie, and 
this movie can then be replayed 
independently of Ihe program using 
the Fanlaplayer program supplied 
with the package. 




V nu Dan load any IFF picture as a background lor your animalkHiB. 



V:hi cjin n\sa loud ;mc: .-in iriiti! h\: rmippi-rl 
ima^e* 11 y&u prefer. 



CONCLUSION 

Although Fantavisiofts user interface 
now looks extremely dated, this is a 
fun program which, with a little effort, 
can reward you with some very good 
quality animation. Unfortunately it 
can't use the colourful new AGA 
screen modes which is a great 
shame, especially for video users. 
Nevertheless, you could use il to cre- 
ate impressive video titles, or it 
you're a lot more ambitious, you 
mighl even like to have a go al your 
own cartoon. -4«k 

Compatible: Any Amiga. %^^jo£ 



30 



the cult classic collection 



u 



tOi*vak the warrior 



^:S 



^ <ZER08 7%I 




** Superior game 
^Ttfie hack 'n' slash 
genre. 



Commodore 
ATnrgj 
Atari ST 



ACE 94%. 



Core Design 
takes a 
graphic; 

stunning 
journey 
into the 
world of „ 
Cybernetics. 



M 



eerKort 



**The scrolling, 
animation and colour 
are all of a high 
standard, but it's the 
play that wins the day. 
This is particularly true 
of the two-player 
version, but even for 
one player, the action 
is tough and just keeps 
on going... War Zone 
is an excellent arcadey 
shoot-em-up. *' 



corporation 


w 





Commodore 
Amiga 
Atari ST 
IBM PC 



Commodore 
Amiga 
Atari ST 







best anim, 
that you're li 
to see on the 
Amiga. Gre. 
and Coi 



^he space 
16 bit quality at only 




cancers 



■Carters ii a nt/H w™r U #cte™rJk of Core Deirgn liimttd 



TRA0EWIND5 HOUSE 
S3 'lA ASHBOURNE RQAD 
OEft&Y 0EZ2 3F5 ENGLAND 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Graph 



ics 



DELUXE VIDEO III 

£99.99 - ELECTRONIC ARTS - 0753 549442 




Using a scripting program cart 
help you to create complex 
animations which last far 
longer lhan conventional 
methods, it's also a good way to cre- 
ate eye-catching demos without 
slashing out hundreds on a lop end 
system such as Sea/a. 

Created as one of Electronic Arts' 
Deluxe Series of productivity tools. 
Deluxe Video is perhaps the least 
well known of all. ranking down there 
with Deluxe Print in the obscurity 
stakes. This is a. shame because as 
the Amiga community finally starts lo 
realise the benefits of multimedia, 
this program is available quite 
cheaply and yet compares very 
favourably lo the more flashy pro- 
grams of today. 



applied- These effects are the central 

part of the program for they are what 
transform your scripts from being 
mere slide-shows into interactive 
movies, 

For example, you define scene 
one as having a duration of ten sec- 
onds. You go into the scene editor 
and specify the load screen option. 
You then apply to that option the 
Fade In effect which will commence 
immediately and have a duration of 3 
seconds. The effect is show/n as a 
flag which is pinned to that scene's 
time line. The flag is connected to the 
time line by two arrows and by mov- 
ing the first of these left or right, you 
specify when the etfecl should start. 
The distance between the two indi- 



MOT 



ON OF 



The package consists ot several sep- 
arate programs of which DV Maker is 
the lirst one you'll need. II provides a 
way of creating time-line based 
screen effects and animation without 
going to the effort of learning a com- 
plicated professional system. 

The program basically consists of 
a series ot scenes which are 
arranged in any order along a time 
line which represents the show. Each 
scene may consist of one or more 
actions upon which effects are 




Each produelkan can tM mawed as a **"*" 

wtiken fl,luea you an overview of the. efilirs 
Ihiny. or as a series of scant* which Ids you 
view and edit (he Individual *cta of a rwfTQf- 
mariDB. 



32 




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I 





You can flnadh a **™nd ot mu*ie module lo *ny rranw ol «n animation, MIDI can awn be uaad 



Detuxr Video provides a. aaleclion at umJiH 
musital sHacts and! Iranailion*. 



caies how long the effect will last for. 

Now below the first time line, you 
define aoolher which replays a sound 
effect. As with (fie picture, the sound 
does not start playing unlil activated by 
an effect. This time the effect merely 
starts the sound playing say, for exam- 
pie, three seconds into Hie scene. After 
another second the pitch of Ihe sound 
is raised by a second effect, and a third 
is used at the seven second mark to 
pan the sound from left to right. 

In yet another time lino an ani- 
mated character mighl be loaded, 
and this character can be scrolled 
across ihe screen at any time. 

By now it s'hould be apparent how 
multiple time lines may be used lo 
activate various events which may 
run concurrently or may be inter- 
leaved chronologically. Each time 
line in a scene is related to a specific 
media action, a screen, animated 
brush, sound or piece of music for 
example. In fact it's even possible to 
use the program to trigger MIDI 
events, which means that you could 
create an entire stage show if your 
computer was MIDI linked to MIDI 
lighting, music and effects devices. 
Unfortunately the program's MIDI 
control is far from sophisticated as if 
can only output SMUS tracks using 
up to eight channels. 

The program offers a very impres- 



sive range of options, and the demos 
that come on two of the lour disks 

are quite appetite whetting. Even 
something as simple as displaying a 
screen offers 24 different options 
covering an intriguing variety of 
effects which you can activate to 
accuracy of 1 /60th of a second, 
which should be more than enough 
for the average user. 

If you use AFtexx, Deluxe Video 
can be used to control external hard- 
ware such as video recorders. 

CONCLUSION 

To be honest I really didn't expeol 
much from this program in an age of 
ever increasing sophislicalion, but I 
was very pleasantly surpnsed. It took 
no more than ten minutes to create 
my first script, and the prugram is a 
complete doddle lo learn, (hough as 
always the rewards are greater if you 
devote more time and effort to your 
work. The system is exlremely flexi- 
ble and intuitive. Once you've learnt 
the very basics, you can learn the 



Create Interactive Multim 
presentations. , , 



jsittess presentarii 
O Enrertafnmenr 
B Educstion 
□ Training 



ElUTRONltrA 



Video M .*n e 
T in» Un its 
" HH:MH :5S . JJ 



Tining 

■ Rea 1 1- me 

IStl Tine Out 

I/O Halt 

linr Step " 



You can also design Idler aclrva pfoducla 
where the user i* required to give soma sort of 
input- 
rest on a 'Wonder what this does' 
basis. Ll looks good on Workbench 
2.0 despite being released before it 
was available. Because of the pro- 
gram's age, it can be found on the 
bargain shelf of many software 
shops, but don't be fooled, this is well 
worth its original £99.99 asking price 
so anything less is a sheer b onus . 
Compatible: Any Amiga /.ffftaj 
with 1 Mb RAM \^jfp 



You can *p*clfy tin 
Timing of yeu» pro- 
duction lo an 
accuracy ol ana 
Jiffy. That's a 60th of 
a second to you and 
me! 



Double Buffer 
Restnr-e BUrk 
- ue ft. B«f a tore 



f mil ro \ 
Loop 

Lock control 
m i , 1 1 " Ship 

ajj Keep ■ > . > ■ ■ t ■ . 




Tha pfoflram aup- 
porta 1he use ol 
animations, anim 
brushes »nd page 
flipping. Ttiia frcene 
was creeled uaino. an 
anim twuah. 



Jraphics amiga buyers guide 




DISNEY 
ANIMATION STUDIO 

£79.99 • INFOGRAMES • 071 738 8199 



Of all the programs reviewed here, 
xtly one can genuinely claim to have 
the endorsement of the world's most 
famous animation studios, but does 
that mean lhat Ihe Disney Animation 
Studio is any good? 

Traditional animator* of line kind 
that matte the classic cartoons is a 
an arduous task requiring the dedi- 
cated work of many people to 
produce even Ihe shortest anima- 
tions, The computer has played an 
increasing role in reducing the 
amount of effort and time needed to 
create animation. 

Although morphing and t weening is 

all very well for certain types of 
movement, high resolution cartoon 
style graphics must still be largely 
drawn by hand, One of the most 
basic techniques in creating anima- 
tion on paper is known as 'onion 
skinning'. This involves drawing the 
character to be animated 1 on trans- 
parent, or semi-transparent paper. 
When it comes to creating the next 
: -.3me of animation, another sheet of 
transparent paper is overlaid on the 
first and the animator can then see 



exactly where changes need to be 
made. Because a lot of the time, 
parts of the character do not move at 
all (the body of speaking characters 
for instance), onion skinning also 
allows the animator to quickly trace 
ihose parts of (he drawing which will 
remain unchanged. 



NSKIN 




This is the entire basis for the? Disney 
Animation Studio. Although it con- 
tains a few very primitive drawing 



Cel 1ft of 16? 



The program site includes * section tailed 
Exposure Sheet from mhet a you can cut and 
paste th« Trainee -of your animaiion in any 
order you like. You can Alio add music and 
*ound eftael* to your worfc.» which stfjms s Ill- 
lie incongruous consJrJarino, the relatively 
basic nature of athrr porta of lfn program. 



JtU 



uma'i -oar ltzi.1 i i'tii 



tools, it certainly doesn't claim to be 
an art package. Us enlire raison d'e- 
tre is its ability to display four levels 
of onion skinned images, each a 
shade darker than the last. 

CONCLUSION 

The program is actually co-produced 
by Walt Disney Computer Software, 
and a specially commissioned 
Donald Duck animalion accompanies 
the program. Much as I love the ani- 
mation, I found the program to be 
hard work compared lo D-Paint and 
its peers. I daresay that compared to 
using tracing paper and a pen, this is 
a doddle, but as I never did that in 
the first place' I can 'I really comment! 
If you're an animation purist, you 
won't be able to do better lhan this, 
but if you want something a hit more 
flexible try elsewhere. 
Compatible: Any Amiga. 



You can see hart 
two Irarne* of anh 
mati On. Thr 
frames moy look 
cluttered hy Ihe 
gtay iHsr-i macjr 
hul in fact ttial 
image Is trig 
onion skin afreet 
ar ivnrif and It c.in 
makn an anima- 
tor'f. life much 
easier. 







[ai 


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CUT 


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The program i a supplied with a disk fuli erf 
prnlesslonalh/ fln imaled sectiona which have 
baan designed io teach you Ihe basic* of Uw 
craft. 



Canny Professionals 

If you have a video digitiser, you 
can save yourself hours of effort by 
using a professional animalion 
'cheat' known as rotoscoping. 
Employed by Waft Disney Studios 
in the making of Sleeping Beauty, 
rotoscoping is a technique 
whereby you take a film or video of 
the real world and use that as the 
outline to trace simpler cartoon 
style graphics. 

If you have a video camera or 
video player, try digitising a few 
sequential frames of a relatively 
uncluttered image. II you're using a 
real-time digitiser this will be eas- 
ier, but il you're not you'll just have 
to manually move the video still on 
by a few frames or turn the camera 
slightly. 

The next stage is to convert 
your image into a line drawing. If 
you are using one of Ihe new 
Rombo digitisers, your software 
already contains an Edge option. 
Art Department Pro also contains a 
Similar option, bul you'll need to 
convert your picture into a grey 
scale image first. Having created 
an oullfne of the objects to include 
in your animation, all you have to 
do is fill iheim in solid colour and 
your basic frames are complete. 
Now all thai remains is to go 
into the animation package of your 
choice and link (he frames to make 
a proper anim file. Bob's your 
uncle, rotoscoping made easy! 














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TOUGH ENOUGH... 

GO PLAY IN THE PARK 



IF ITS NOT JUWIC PARK ITS EXT 



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hum 

.. |V i I'Jk-L M < 

Mia em mi i iwW » i * ra «u 

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PC COMPATIBLE 
CBM AMIGA 

SMRttlMNM 



inTiBfTBinmenrr 

nMTEm 



■ 



OCEAN SOFTWARE LIMITED ■ 2 CASTIE STREET • CASTLEFIELD ■ MANCHESTER ■ M3 4LZ ■ TELEPHONE: 06. 832 6633 ■ FAX: 06! 634 0660 



Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 



SCALA MM21 

£1 49 - SCALA UK - 0920 444294 




Scai'a MM210 is ideal for a variety at rnvlii-mvd 
ind sound. Th»ia image look afcoul 3D seconds 

If you need to produce eye^tghmg 
multimedia presentations, which 
can be interactive or completely 
automatic, SeyteMW^fOisyour 
best option. 

A presentation (or scripl as its 
known} can include text, animations, 
music and samples. It can accept 
optional input from a viewer via the 
keyboard, joystick, mouse, or touch 
screen, making it easy to produce 
informative displays of professional 
quality for use in places such as muse- 
ums, shopping malls, etc, where the 
end-user may not be computer-liter- 
ate. For that matter, no great 
experience is required to use the pro- 
gram, itself, as it has been written to 
enable even those with limited com- 
puter skills lo get to grips wilh it quickly 
and easily, The ring-bound manual is 
good, with easy-to-follow tutorials. 



IN 



Scala contains its own language, 
Lingua, though for mosl purposes you 
won 'l need to pother with either of 
these. The AGA chipset is also Fully 
supported, and HAM pictures can be 
used, though these are best reslricted 
to still images to avoid fringing prob- 
lems when using text. The program 
comes on eight disks; mosl of these 




it project:;, and can combine- graphics, animation 
to create 

contain backgrounds, animations, 
symbols, demos, music modules, 
sound samples and fonts. 

A Scsla script consists of separate 
pages, which can be a plain colour, 
one of the many hi- res texlured back- 
grounds supplied, created yourself in 
any Amiga paint program, scanned, (a 
flatbed scanner is recommended), or 
digitised. YOU can control the speed at 
which the pages appear, and choose 
whether viewer input is required lo go 
onto the neti one or its arrival is auto- 
matic after a set time. Onscreen 
buttons of any size can be defined, 
and a mouse-click on a button can be 
programmed lo go to any other 
screen, making real infraction possi- 
ble; tor example giving the viewer Die 
ability lo view specific information by 
burton selection, One of the supplied 
demos shows a simple quiz which 
illustrates the use of interactive but- 
tons, but much more complicated 
scripts can be devised, which can 
involve, for instance, database 
searches and conditional loops. 

Regula r Amiga fonts , Cotorfonts 
and Workbench 2 tulef tonts are all 
suitable for use in Scaia.'and Agfa 
Compugraphic fonts can also be used 
if converted to "bullet" formal. Text can 
be justified or dragged with the mouse 
to the poinl on the page where you 
want it lo come to rest, if you decide to 
have il fly into the screen. Outlines, 
shadows, and an impressive 3D effect 
can be added, with control over the 
depth and direction of shadows and 
the "extrusion" of the lelters. Long 
lines of tent can also be made to 
"crawr across Ihe f ieW of view, If a 
screen contains mere than one line of 
text you can import each line wuh a 
different wipe, and even change the 

A !i;i it pin script stiowmg ths way the program 
breaks dawn your presentation Into separate 
page*, each wllh their own afflicts and wipes. 



colour of the text already onscreen in 
response to the arrival of the next line, 

Animations, both drawn and digi- 
tised from video can be run, and as 
anims may be grabbed straight from 
hard disk without loading to memory 
first, this can enable large animations 
to be run very eff ieienlty, though for 
this feature to operate properly a fasl 
chip and fast hard drive are required. 

Sampled sounds and SMUS and 
tracker modules can be included in 
your scripts, with control over looping, 
volume and fade in/out. If you own a 
sampler, this can be controlled from 
within Scala, with mosl of the popular 
samplers supported directly and a 
generic setting for those nol sup- 
ported. Sampled sounds can be edited 
and manipulated, and if you're running 
low on memory they can be com- 
pressed to about half size, though this 
may result in a kiss in quality. There is 
also a MIDI player, which supports 
MIDI File Formats 0, 1 and 2. 

If you decide to change the running 
order of the pages this can be done 
very easily by selecting the "shuffle" 
icon. This brings up a page showing a 
thumbnail of each page already 
defined, and lets you shuffle them into 
Ihe order you want, Even after a page 
has been defined it remains fully 
editable so you can change any fea- 
ture of it at any time, swapping fonts, 
colours and effects until you arrive at a 
pleasing result. 

CDTV, Canon ION still video 
player, and Philips VP, Sony and 
Pioneer Laserdisc players are also 
supported. 

CONCLUSION 

Whether you're an ambitious specialist 
wanting to produce sophisticated pro- 
fessional multimedia presentations or 
you just want tg produce something for 
your own entertainment, you will find 
ScalaMM200io be your most powerful 
resource. 

Compatible: 2.04 Amiga 
and 1Mb Chip RAM, /.I^Jfik 
2Mb Fast Ft AM and a S^gjP 



f Scala Multimedia 




Very revealing 

The real fun of using Swfa starts when 
you begin lo add wipes and fades to yo ur 
scripts. More than twenty-live rjillerenl 
ones are supplied, and they art added 
with a simple mo use -click; there is a pre- 
view option, so you can easily decide - 
which one gives youths result you're I sail- 
ing lor. 

The eff eels range Irrjm simple fades to 
realty eye-catching spiral reveals, flips 
and collapses - like you see on T.tf. and 
videos, ft different fade or wipe can he 
applied tc any screen or line ol lenl. and 
Ihe speed of operation is fully control- 
lable. Texl can fade in, start off-screen and 
Ity In from the lap, bottom, sides or ear- 
ners and came Id rest at any position on 
the page, or appear gradually, using your 
choice ol reveal, II can then disappear 
alter a set lime, using the same range of 
effects. If you want to include lonrj lines of 
text, these can be made to "crawl" across 
Ihe page. These events can be synchro- 
nised lo sound, with an internal accuracy 
of milliseconds. 







The animation control cartel from where you 
can specify Ihe nu rotor of limes an anim is 1 o 
be replayed as well as lis rtplay r,i1«?, If you 
don't have a lot ol memory, you ran rvrtn an i- 
milt directly from disk. 




The program Mmpn- is sound both in ids form 
of modules and sample* **id *ven MIDI Hies. 



SCALA 



Y* HI 




H 3 97 




Edit 
Delete 



Load script system 



saue script 



You can preview nil of Ihe graphic! used In your scrip) and they can easily be rearranged wllh i 
few click* of Ihe mouse. 



» 



35 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 G f a P tl J C S 



ri'A^A 



Over the past few years, fractal land- 
scape programs have become very 
popular. They can produce aftraelive 
photo-realistic scenes tor little or no 
effort, and such scenes have been used in a 
number of games and demos, to mention 
nothing of television. 

There is a great variety of such programs 
available, and although they may have some 
unique features, they also have a lot in com- 
mon with each other. 



I 



\tm VJ\PZ £LSj\ 






jiArujjs 



Travel back in time a couple of years and fractal generated images 
were all the vogue, appearing on t-shirts f posters, everywhere. But 
fractal imagery doesn't just mean pretty Spirograph pictures - 
they're capable of a lot more... 



VISTA PRO 3.0 

£69.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



| »moa. . j i l r i ft |lw>tx»t iau«i 



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Vjite haa a friendly and ea&y to understand in!irF*e»-, wtiich i* just as well because It nas options 
galorel 



Science fiction guru Arthur C 
Clarke says of this program 
'It's so good that if it gels into 
your computer, you'll never 
get any work done,' Let's see why. 

Vista Pro Is two ugh I to us by 
Virtual Reality Laboratories in the 
United States. They have con- 
stantly developed the program over 
the last Tour or five years, and have 
spent hundreds of thousands of 
dollars convening geological maps 
to run with the program, Thanks to 
their efforts, you can now travel the 
world and beyond without ever 
leaving your armchair. 

The basic idea behind the pro- 
gram is that you load a two 
dimensional contour map of the 
area ic- be recreaied, and the pro- 
gram will then calculate exactly 
what you would see if you were 
standing at a particular point look- 
ing in a specific direction. 



Vista's (racial generator was used (u crcalo 
this ficticious landscape, Amazing, eh?! 



fflf 



PPING THE 



The maps it uses are known as 
Digital Elevation Maps or DEMs for 

shorl. and 27 of them are supplied 
with the program. These mostly 
cover areas of geological interest in 



America but there are a few 
European location included. as well 
as one from Mars. 

Having decided which area you 
wish to model, simply load the 
required DEM and you're ready to 
go. Before you tell the program 10 
render, there are a huge number ol 
optional preferences that you can 
set to tailor the landscape to your 
exact requirements. For starters 
you can specify whelher il is night 
or day, cloudy or clear and what 
colours the landscape should be. 
You cart also add a variety of tree 
types, to mention nothing of rivers 
and lakes, in short, you can create 
the landscape of your imagination. 

Once you're satisfied with the 
landscape, click Render and Vista 
will automalically draw the land 
scape of your choice, allowing for 
the lighting conditions, which are 
also completely user-definable In 
fact, by creating a scrip!, you could 
even create an animated series in 
which the observer's viewpoint 
changes and the light also changes 
to represent the passage of the 
sun, 

The image is rendered in £4 -bit 
colour making it ideal tor profes- 
sional use. However, you can 
always save a picture in a mode 
appropriate to your requirements. 
Unfortunately, ils 24-bit rendering 
mode, lo say nothing of l he vast 
range of user-definable options, 
does mean thai the program is 




extremely RAM hungry and in fad 
requires a minimum of four megs of 
memory, or six if you're going to be 
using the -AG A modes. This puis it 
well beyond the reach of the ordi- 
nary person which is a shame 
considering how much fun it is to 
use. 

If you want to go on a total flight 
gf fantasy, you can use Vista's frac- 
tal generator to create completely 
fictitious worlds. By sped lying a 
seed value, the program will create 
a landscape that exists only in your 
computer's memory. You can spec- 
ify the type of DEM that will be 
created, an island or mainland, and 
you can also indicate a vertical 
scaling factor in case you want to 
make samel hing really wacky. 

LOWLY AS SHE 



! L o° E ? 



Even on accelerated Amigas, ren- 
dering a landscape can be quite 
lime consuming, and on an ungc- 



Have you considered,*. ? 

TERRAF0RM 

£N/A- MERIDIAN DISTRI- 
BUTION -081 543 3500 

Sooner or later you're ping to lire af 
the digital elevation maps supplied Willi 
Vista. When that happens vnu can sillier 
buy more, or you can use Terraformtn 
make yaur own. 

Although Vista maps may seem 
incredibly complicated, io actual fad 
the v're lit! le more tha it a series a f nu m- 
bers representing various heights. These 
numbers are converted into different 
screen colours representing various alti- 
tude ranges. 

Terralorm allows you lo modify exist- 
ing landscapes or create your own from 
scratch. It provides you with a lew basic 
building tools wilh which you can build 
mountains oreralers. raugherr or smooth 
the terrain and generally shape the land to 
your every whim, You can even add build- 
ings and one of the demos actually 
contains the Hoover Dam. 

CONCLUSION 

rerrafomt is simple lo use, primarily due 
to its hasic hut adequate selection al tools. 
H does what il should, but it's far from 
glamorous, End of story. 
Compatible: Any Amiga. 70% 



36 



■ ■ p " 



Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 




.-■.:.! vitige \!L llu: inly way l'i;il you can <!Kplurn ;in nil/i-r: I Mount 5t1 ilnlrjn:; volcano II 

erupted spectacularly several yean age and now the entire cap la aliasing. 



celerated machine a high res land- 
sea p-e could easily tie your 
computer up for half a day or more. 
You can choose exactly how high a 
level of realism the program should 
produce, and low levels naturally 
take far less time to create. 
Ultimately (hough, you're going to 
want lo render a scene with all the 
extras switched on. This means 
that scenes will consist ot thou- 
sands of minute polygons, each of 
which is blended and shaded. Any 
plants you may include can also be 
created wilh varying levels of real- 
ism, ranging from' two dimensional 
stick plants to multi -layered three 
dimensional pines, cacti, oaks and 
palms. 

If you're producing landscapes 
for television of video work, vVsfa's 
animation abilities are particularly 
useful, The program will accept a 
script which describes a path 
through your ihree dimensional 
landscape. You can control every 



aspect of the path ranging from 
pitch and yaw, to movement speed 
and lens type, A recent Tomorrow's 
World program used this feature 
with ihe Martian landscape to 
demonstrate how the planet could 
be veg elated. This feature is 
extremely powerful but is also very 
tricky to gel to grips with unless 
you have both a great deal of 
patience and a high degree of spa- 
tial awareness. 

CONCLUSION 

Overall, I found Vists Pro to be a 
very powerful and enieriainiog lool 
to use, The cloud feature is still a 
bil hit and miss, and good as the 
irees are, they could still be 
improved, Overall, the program is a 
joy to use, and is almost worth 
upgrading your Amiga for. 
Any Amiga with Workbench 2.04 
And 4Mb RAM {6Mb If 
using AG A screen 
modes). 




Pitt* S-d 
Ct.. L irtttttt 



u.lt i-4 
6..4..L 1> 



f«ltt 3-d 



P»*** i Itwjfl 



iiHTiitKrr*iTii «■ jT^TiiTuifcrTiifci ;r.nri niHj«ni.ri-M »L> rHHHin~[Hi u) 






Have you considered?. 
MAKEPATH 

One d1 Wfrt'J greatest sire ngths Is Ms ability to create superb animated voyages through 
your landscapes. Unfortunately il can tie an immensely time-consuming and complicated 
business Id create pur own animation - unless you've gal MakePalha I course! 

Thanks lo (Ills ingenious program, all you need lo da is load the appropriate Digital 
Elevation Map into Ihe program, and trace a path using Ihe mouse. Each time you press Ihe 




The program ha* iom> pr*ny compliciinl trie ganBritiori algorilhrni. Want to tee what Mourn 
Fu|i would look hk« covered! in palmt? Well, now ycu t*n! 



Trurrr? 3 nj lhr^c iimpig stages to creating a pwlti. 1 , Load a 

it. 2. Select Ihe vehicle 1ype. 3. The program wilt now eolcul 

based on the abilities and movement properties or the vehicle you chose. In thii snima- 

lion we re travelling dy mi aille. High alhtude, wide turning circle.) 

button, a control peml will be placed and a line will be drawn between it and Ihe previous 
point. These represent your path arnund the landscape. 

II you want 10 exercise lutal c nntrol bye r the way you r a ntm atio n c om es nut. you on 
specify every single parameter annul Ihe way Ihe viewpoint changes as you move around 
the landscape. II you prefer to lei ihe computer ilo the legwork for you, you can choose 
from a predefined lisl ol movement types which indicate the way thai the path and view- 
point will Change. This lisl includes motorbikes, gliders, missiles and even dune buggies 
and the choice you make affects things such as the way Ihe viewpoint banks as you turn a 
comer or how close to Ihe ground you are. 

Ynu can also specify Ihe speed ol each partitfynnr path as well as thetolal number of 
frames il should occur over There is a reasonably fast wire-fra me preview mode which 
you can use to tesi yuurpallt beioreyou save it. 

Once a pall) has been saved, you can then load il into Visit Pn>\6 use as Ihe instruc- 
tion lite lor lis animation generation. 

CONCLUSION 

Makepslh rea I ly is a very c lever prnq ra m . an d as I ah our saving tool \ think that it i s 

unmatched. Again, the results on their flwn are tin) spectacular but when combined with 

Viste Pirn they can he breath -taking, 

An absolutely essential accessory lor Vista users. 

Compatible: Any Amiga. 91% 



» 



37 



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0753-554-338 



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Buiima Mailiirux. Knight jnJ fcmiinalur imi|W* itvUrd by Vr-' 



Educational Adventures 

from 

COOMBE VALLEY SOFTWARE 

Written by teachers to make learning fun 



A .ii" 



1 



« ■ ■! adventure uamea for 5-13 year olds, which help to develop logical thought, 
reading ano keyboard skills as well as specific educational topks, 

MATHS DRAGON - for ages 5-12+ Amiga Format Gold 

Practice the four ruLes of number in the caves ol tin.- Maths Dragana, while rescuing llu. 1 scat- 
iriiil poll's til y<nn ii:n:i sn. You control the level P* difficulty Hrtd (he type of sum which 

the Dragon wfll ask 

TIDY THE HOUSE - for ages 5 - 9 

,-\ tirn[ adventure fcn ihe j«junBcr player Can you dear up ike mess ilwi your younger toot] e 

and sister have made and (Sen get them read} to go out before mum tames to find you? 

CAVE MAZE - For ages S - 13 

A first adventure fas an older < hdld They must find a Baby dragon's lunch bos feed Inm :ind 

[hen aukJe him home [hrewgh .i maze "I •• ives and obsii les. llu mase paths and obstacle 

pcwlikms change with each new xame. 

FRACTION GOBLINS - for ages 8 13+ 
Practice v"" |r " tlons while exploring the caves "I iht Fraction Goblins. The game deals 

with all li'.i.i rules nf miiiiK-r For simple, StnpirapeMind Red fractions. You mi the type ol 

Him and cUfBeuliy level foi each game. 

PICTURE FRACTIONS tor ages 7-10 
Pfer) ,i gaits ..I Puzzle i ace with the young Fraction Goblin* at their Hatchrjay Party Sel (he 

level of difficulty and ilkcn solw ton plctoml mKtiori problems i" win the game 

TIME EUES - IV it ages ft - 12 

Paiha Time has gone out fw a while, leaving you ic> dog sii the Watch Dog, JuM feed and 

water him and tab him fot .i -■■•.ilk and he'll be no trouble it's a ptrj thai die Time Files 

have Rol out officii i age Hn [hcv'll leave you nkme if yuu cm ntwlt sonic lime i i eSlons 

You select the type nf questions and the levd of difficult) Hit game deafe will m as dock 

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k-n'.i .in ., - , '• ■ 1 1 1: i'i>le, 

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AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 GraphJCS 



SCENERY ANIMATOR 4 

£67.99 - FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE - Q532 319444 




Vau can actually animate JO objects a* pari of 
ilart point el an abject and i1* destination and 

Vistas arch rival has struggled 
over the years to catch the pub- 
lic's eye, but has never quite 
managed il. Now at last il 
includes some features that finally lift it 
out of Ibe ordinary. 

Like Vista, Scenery Animator is a 
fractal landscape generator and anima- 
tor. It is capable of loading digital 
elevation maps or creating Iractaf land- 
scapes from seed values. It can't 
process D-Paint map graphics likg 
Vista can. so you won't be using the 
program tq model your home town 
unless a DEM is already available. 

ACE IN THE HOUE 

Despite the fact that at just about every 
level the program is slightly interior to 
Vista Pro 3.0, it has one massive ace 
up Us sleeve, and for many people it's 
such a significant bonus, (hat all its 



GENESIS 



a Sctntiy Animator animation. Just specify tr*s 

ttW program will work Out th* rosl lot you. 

short-comings will seem insignificant. 
So what is this special feature I hear 
you ask breathlessly? The ability to 
load 3D objects of course, what did 
you expect?! 

This ability is well supported boiJh 
by the way the program displays land- 
scapes, and the way it animates them. 
For starters, once you've loaded a 




The standard overhead v \cw is supported as 

wei i. And you can me this to position ths 
viewer to an accuracy of a melre o* lei*. 



£49.99 - SOFTWARE BUSINESS - 0480 496497 




Trying to cash in on the fractal 
craze, Micro illusions' Genesis 
is not quite in the same league 
as other such programs. At 
least it's cheap and cheerful though! 
As with the other commercial pro- 

39 



grams reviewed here, Genesis is 
capable of using DEMs or creating 
landscapes from its own Iraetal 
seed. Although it has many of the 
features contained in Scenery 
Animator for example, il just doesn't 
seem to score particularly highly in 
inrms of user-friendliness. 
Ultimately, I suppose it's the results 
that count, and Genesis does draw 
more convincing images than 
Scenery Animator, although it stilt 
lags behind Hats. 

I think that the main grumble I 
have with this program, apart from 
,, its chronically slow .rendering 
;» speeds, is the way that everything is 
tucked away out of sight. I'm not 
sure if this is a particularly iair criti- 
cism to make, but after having used 
the other two, Genesis seems like 

Check out your viawpoint Jjeior* yew commit 
to a full render wim the apeedy wireframe pre- 
view mode. 



landscape, you can see il in the plan 
view in the same way as Vista, but, 
and this is a very nice feature indeed, 
you can also see it in ttiree dimen- 
sions. Ot course the 3D view doesn t 
show you the same detail or even enr 
rect lighting such as will appear in the 
finished scene, but it does give you a 
damned good idoa how the eventual 
scene will look. It's also very handy 
when you come to position objects in 
your scene. Vista does offer a 3D pre- 
view mode, but only as a hard-to-see 
wire- frame, 

Anyway, as with Vista, you can 
specify your position and lighting, etc 
prior to rendering a scene. This is far 
easier to do in Scenery Animator 
because every change is immediately 
displayed in 3D However, ft would be 
wrong of me not lo mention )he fact that 
the program is far less sophisticated in 
the range of options il offers, and in my 
opinion, the landscapes dont look quite 
as realistic as the rival package. The 
main reason for this is that the margin 
(where one type of land starts and 
another ends, say al the tree-line for 
instance) is very dubious in the way 
that it's represented. 

Having said that, the way that (fees 
and clouds are drawn, is lar more con- 
vincing and you can even get into the 
branches of a tree il that takes your 
fancy! 

NIPPY RENDERING 

The program's rendering time is 
extremely impressive, and inexplicably, 
it is many times fasier in 24-bit mode. 
than in the less colourful screen 
modes. I can only assume that it's 
because the program doesn't actually . 
draw 24-bit images, ft renders them 
straight to disk. Mind you, I rendered a 
HAM image then a 24-bil version of the 
same scene and I'm darned if I could 



quite a hostile environment, 

It's not all negative though. For 
starters you can run the program in 
only one megabyte of RAM. 
Compare this to the four needed for 
Vista and Ihe three that Scenery 
Animator requires and the advan- 
tage starts lo become clear. 

The program also includes an 
easy way to alter the colour of parts 
of a landscape after it's been ren- 
dered. GSfWSiS is also the only 
program to provide a very quick 
colour preview mode. 



see any diflerence between the two... 

It's when animating that the pro- 
gram really shines brightest, because it 
uses such a user-friendly system for 
specifying what goes where. Rather 
man making you specify every single 
pari of every frame, you only have to 
define key frames. The program will 
then calculate the movement between 
them, including any objects that may 
be present. 



OK, so Scenery Animator falls a long 
way short of the technical perfection of 
VisUi. bui it scorns highly on the user- 
friendly scale. Whereas animation is a 
laborious task in Vista, it's almost a 
pleasure with Scenery Animator. Much 
as I love Vista, this program really puts 
the fun into landscape generation, 
If mathematical perfection and 
absolute photorealism is your goal, 
then look elsewhere. Il you want to 
spend many enjoyable hours creating 
landscapes and moving objects 
through them, then ibis is the one for 
you. Very accomplished and nicely 
designed 

Any Amiga with Kickstart 
2 or above and 3Mb RAM- 




CONCLUSION 

Genesis is not as accomplished as 
either of the two previous programs, 
but you can use il on a standard 
A500 with 1Mb of memory. However, 
the program is agonizingly slow to 
render, even on an accelerated 
Amiga with maths co-pro. With care 
though, you can produce results 
which are barely distinguishable 
from its rivals, 
Any Amiga with 1Mb 
RAM and AmigaDOS 
1.3 or higher. 



¥%P* 




AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



raphi 




3U AND RAY TrMl^JS PRt rjjiAJB 






Creating 3D images has 

never been simpler. 

Today's 3D programs are 

super fast compared to 

what was available a 

couple of years ago. 

Make your own Brave 

New Worlds. 



Thanks to the Amiga's superb graphical abili- 
ties, it has gained a following of people who 
use it lor serious video and TV work. For 
such people few programs are as important 
as a 3D Tenderer with which they can create stun- 
ningly realistic objects and animations without the 
costly expense ot building models. Although there 
are a number of packages available only a very 
few of them can be sakl to contend on equal 
terms. 

These car* basically be divided into two sec- 
tions: ray tracers end CAD packages Hay Iraeing 
is the process of tracing every single ray of light 
within a scene to calculate exactly how each pixel 
in that scene should look. In (tie early days ol ray 
tracing the ability lo model a variety of surface tex- 



tures and light refracting/reflecting properties was 
considered someihing special, but nowadays 
we've gone far beyond that with the ability to wrap 
iFF images around three dimensional objects lo 
say nothing of texture and bump mapping and 
even particle based animation systems that until a 
few years ago were the exclusive domain of 
research labs and computer departments in big 
universities. 

The second section is tar less, glamorous 
because the end result is quite duli to look at 
unless it's processed by a ray tracing package. 
CAD or Computer Aided Design essentially con- 
sists of using a computer to design 3D objects, 
although you could also use it to work in two 
dimensions. 






IMAGINE 2 

£149.99 - Hobbyte - 0727 856005 



Developed from the old Turbo 
Silvef ray tracer. Imagine is 
now one of the most popular 
home tracers in she world. 

Available on both the Amiga and the 
PC, artwork developed using (his 
package was prominent at the recent 
computer graphics festival in Italy, 
it uses a traditional approach to 
object modelling whereby all objects 
are created as a series of linked 
points which form facets. Each facet 
can be given different properties 
including colour and texture. It's also 
possible to wrap IFF pictures around 
an object. Alternatively IFF images 
can be used as 'maps' to calculate 




the texture of an object. 

Having created your objects, they 
need, lo be arranged within the 3D 
scene. If they are to be animated, 
you can use the action editor to 
define Ihe paths that various objects 
will take. As hierarchical movement 
is supported, you can define one 
object's movement relative to 
another, so that both parts are 
always moved as a related pair. For 
example, a finger has a complete 
range of movement, but that move- 
ment cannot be independent of the 
hand, Wherever the hand goes, so 
does the finger. 

Having finally defined your anima- 
tion, you only need render it in the 
Project editor and you"re done. By 
using entirely separate editors at 
every stage of the production pro- 
cess, the working area is kept clear 
of unnecessary options, which is just 
as well because this is a complicated 
enough business already! 

The learning process is definitely 
not heiped by the fad that the man- 
ual is pretty dire- Fortunately some 
kind soul has already thought to write 
a help book called 'Understanding 
Imagine 2. It seems a bit of cheek to 
have to buy a help book the second 
you buy a new piece of software, but 
iE you want to use what is arguably 
the most powerful piece of 3D anima- 
tion software available for the Amiga, 
then that's the price you have to pay. 

CONCLUSION 

A good solid program that is especially 
capable in the animation department. 
A well designed user-interface makes 
it one of the easier packages to use, 
and although object creation is not 
quite as elegant as Real 3D 25, the 
end results are just as good. 
Any Amiga with 3Mb 
RAM and a 40Mb 
Hard Drive. 




The proflrar* "present* fibjMts uilng a eonventionfll Trl-vlew, although a 
addition of a psrspaclhi* viewpoint tu'fva 1Mb- into rrtei-e- of a duad-uiaw. 



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AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 Graph.CS 




\ 



REAL 3D 2 



£394.90 - HOBBYTE COMPUTING - 0582 457195 



Whereas Imaging 2 lakes a very clin- 
ical and traditional approach to the 
whole business of ray tracing, Real 
3D takes a much more theoretical . 
object based approach. For instance, 
whereas in Imagine you'd deline a 
sphere as a number of linked facets 
which form a mesh of a particular 
shape, Real 3D would say 'Here's a 
sphere in position X and size Y'. 
When it comes to rendering, this con- 



ceptual approach can produce better 
results although at a cost in terms of 
rendering speeds. 

The theoretical approach to object 
modelling extends far beyond the lit- 
eral creation of 3D shapes, it 
encompasses she entire Real 3D 
world and makes possible effects 
that would require mind numbing 
compulations lo perform with other 
packages. 



You can ehooso 
from j» large 

selection ol b<fiil£ 

shapes, (called 

prim Hives), or 

you can simply 

create your own 

objects entirely 

Jrom scralcn. 



n 

ol fe»i 



t-IMP 

Splint I 

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Myiifl 

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101 Cul eyrfcid 



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Circle 
SF Circ*e 
Cylinder 



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Cut "M.BSK 



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|>p.B 



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o 



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j TriBipareiKy 

Turbidity 

Turbid iit , 

Refraction 

Rotifttnrsj 

Cither- 

6unp hfrijht 

Effect 

Expression 



LIID 





Graphics amiga buyers guide 94 




















uS fc\ ^ v 


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A REVOLUTION 

With most Amiga 3D software 
objects are no more than a series of 
mathematical references which 
describe an object's shape, size. 
texture and location. II the package 
is clever like Imagine 2, it can even 
describe an object's mechanical 
relationships to other things in the 
world. However, in ihe world of Real 
3D objects also have mass and 
velocity. They inhabit a world that 
has gravity and they will react to 



e-ach other if they collide- A bad will 
roll down a hill, or bounce ofl the 
floor if dropped. This real world 
approach means that you don't 
have to worry about the mathemat- 
ics of dynamics, all you need to 
know is the physical properties of 
the objects you are defining. 

Real 3D is revolutionary for 
another reason too; il lets you 
define exactly the way I hat you 
want to work with the program, and 
what viewpoints you feef are neces- 



sary in order to manipulate your 
objects. 

The program even comes with 
ils own programming language 
which permits you to create anima- 
tion scripts of such complexity and 
accuracy that they would be impos- 
sible under any other method. For 
example, the language lets you acti- 
vate various particle animation 
systems which are used to model 
ihe apparently random motion of 
leaves in the wind or rain drops, 



CONCLUSION 

Five years, ago the lop film labs 
were drooling over effects such 
as these, and now you can create 
them in your own home. Wot 
cheap by an means, but com- 
pared to a Silicon Graphics 
machine, or a Sun Work Station 
an absolute snip! 
Compatible: Amy Amiga 
with an 020 or higher 
and a 68Bai/2 maths co- 
pro and 3Mb RAM. 



<%p 



: 



i 
i 

I 



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Commodore & Atari Controllers 






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Miniature vi rsion ol Qjuatro. 

Suitable tor younger ganiesplayels or hand-field play. 

Model to L JT 151 £12.99 inc. VAT, 






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The world's lii 

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Eight-direction 
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Model No. JT 160 
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£15.99 inc. VAT. 



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Graphics amiga buyer s guide 94 




I' s * Ml lonfl in 1tie tooth nati, but Sculpt 4D tin itill pro-dues decani results, and at thla prl» 
you can arrewdl in feto a chancel] 

SCULPT 4D 

£39.99 - MICROPACE - 0753 551 888 



The original Juggler demo was cre- 
ated using a package called The Ray 
Tracer. Several years of develop- 
ment down the line and 
Scuipt-Animate 4D was bom. 

This was once considered tg be 
the ullimate in state of the art ray-lrac- 
ing software and cast almost as much 
as Real 3D does today. Now, its rather 
creaky In-view interface and limited 
leatures mean thai it's hardly even 
considered in round-ups of this sort. 
But hang on a second, you can now 
buy what is still a very capable pack- 
age for well under fiHy pounds, and 
thai makes it well worth considering! 

11 doesn't have any of the flashy 
texture or bump mapping options that 
Imagine offers, and it certainly can't 
compete with the- particle systems in 
Real 3D, but whal it does otter is a 

Famous 
last words 

Talk atoCtUK pullm g y nur fact in your 
mouth: I offer you this uefeasibly npli- 
mislic quote laker Irnm the 
Stulpl-AnimstB manual: 'Ten years 
hence, when rendering is done in real 
time, disk storage is tabulated in giga- 
bytes, and She average RAM con ni Is the 
size or a Bui Eh, Sculpt-Animate will still 
lie around lighting the way." 

Wall, rendering is now done in real 
time on the Vid so- Toaster w il h the 
Tnasler Screamer, hard drives ol 1.2 Gigs 
and a have art commonplace far these 
that can afford! them and it's passible la 
upgrade even a lowly ASQOlo 128 megs 
ol FAM. So what's missing Irani the pic- 
ture? Whavs thai dimly spullering candle 
I see oil behind me id the distance? Oh, 
it's SculplAntmale. Far some reason 
Byte by Byte decided it wasn't worth 
developing for the Amiga anymore, and 
have now lurried liieir attention exclu- 
sively to the- Apple Macintosh (although 
what they hoped In f i nd Ih are that the 
Amiga couldn't oiler I don't know.. .). 



good, solid, reliable ray tracing and 
animation package that can output at 
any resolution and screen size in up 
10 24-bit colour. 

It uses a similar point and facet 
based approach to object creation as 
that used by imagine, and again 
each facet can be assigned a surface 
property, ranging from matt, to nearly 
transparent. To the best of my knowl- 
edge this was the first package to 
offer I rue hierarchical motion, and it's 
capable of producing some stunning 
images, although you'll need 
patience in abundance, if nol for the 
creation of objects which is taxing 
enough, then for the hours you'll 
spend twiddling your thumbs whilst 
the program renders your image. 

CONCLUSION 

Competent and cheap, but not very 
friendly lo use. A good one for begin- 
ners on a budget though. 
Compatible: Any Amiga , 
with 1Mb RAM. 





s an incredible plant gh 
.rourtfi. 



ch you can use to cr 



Although Ihe program uses the- sizndflrd iri- 
vitw, you cm preview any screen In i virletv 
of resolution* prior m rendering. 



ttaydaace is a little known ray tracer train Radiance Sollware in San Jose. California. It is 
totally scri nl driven, and the only lime you'll see anything even approximating a user- 
friendly front end is when you load the rendering module. 

The program work's by p recessing listings defining the exact mathematical nature ol 
everything In a scene. This Is an extremely males intensive approach lor the user, but il 
does mean that It's easier lo create complex geometric lornis such as arcs and curves, with 
ultra-precision. Charles Comstack, Ihe program's author suggests lhal Ihe program is ide- 
ally suited lo architects and other such designers, ortoeducalional establishments. 

Whilst this may he true, the program is no slouch when il comes down lo its features 
lis!. II supports the now almost obligatory nurture and hump mapping, but more interest- 
ingly, il also supports the generation ol three dimensional fractal landscapes, which sure 
beats checker hoards a; a background! Raj Dance a\in has a fascinating plant algorithm 
which can literally he used to 'grow' three dimensional trees and hushes into a scene, 
although don't expect such scenes lo tender in len seconds. 

The accompanying manual is designed purely as a reference source and contains no 
tutorials unlariunateh/. This means that whal is already an exceptionally complex program, 
is even harder to learn than perhaps It needs to he. 



CONCLUSION 

il resu lis are whal c uuii ts . the n flay Dance deserves lo be up there with the h i g bo ys . I f 
user-friendliness Is Ihe primary goal then it rates somewhere down below Ihe sub -sewers. 
II you have a masters degree in applied physics, and a Bachelor ol Arts in drlhcull maths 
you'll probably enjoy this program. The res! of us are probably going le he happier with a 
more graphical approach. 
Compatible: Any Amiga with Ihlh RAM and 2 floppy drives. 95% 



49 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 braplllCS 









CALIGARI 24 

£99.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 




-me program 1 * incredibly easy «o u*e Interface i* ore ol ONgw/s most positive leaUino*. 



One of the major problems with 
ray tracing, is the huge amount 
erf time it takes to actually render 
each picture. Caftgari overcomes 
this problem by adopting an entirety dif- 
ferent approach. 

Ray tracing literally involves tracing 
every single ray of light in a scene, to 
see how it colours every single pixel. 
With simple non-reflective scenes this 
can be bad enough, but once you start 
adding more complex objects with 
reflective or near-translucent surface 
properties, the amount of calculations 
involved can be immense as hght rays 
are reflected, deflected and refracted all 
over the place, 

Caligati describes itself as three 
dimensional imaging software rather 
than a ray tracer. The reason tor this- is 
that it uses a system known as Scanline 
rendering instead of the more popular 
and time consuming ray tracing 

Scanline rendering looks at shape, 
colour and relative depth of each object 
in a scene, but it doesnt calculate reflec- 
tions erf any sort. That means that a 
scanlined sphere wil sMI be visibly 
sphencal because the program: has 
taken into account light sources and the 
deptti of different parts of the sphere. 
Carfcjari images are ideal for circum- 
stances where speed is mere important 
than absolute photo-realism. 

Of all Ihe 3D packages, Ca/^ao'has 
*he friendliest user-interface, dispensing 
with the conventional tn-view ol imagine 
and ScurpL and offering instead a full- 
screen isometric perspective which 
makes visualisation of the finished scene 
much easier, To make things even bet- 
ter, this view can be twisted and turned 
with the click of a mouse, so that you 



can quickly examine every perspective 
of a scene, 

The unfortunate cost for such flexibil- 
ity is the toss of the multi-tasking 
environment because Ihe program 
closes all other applications including the 
Workbench in order to gain the neces- 
sary speed needed to maintain its own 
display. Whilst this is inconvenient, you 
•soon get used to it and in my opinion the 
flexibility ol this system compensates for 
Ihe loss. 

CaHgan 24 siso has a very exciting 
design feature called organic deforma- 
tions. What this techie-sounding phrase 
actually means is thai you can stretdi an 
object as if it were made of rubber. 
When you enter 'deform mode' the 
object la be distorted is surrounded by a 
box. Grab any point of the box and drag 
or twist it, and the object reacts accord- 
ingly, creating natural looking 
transformations. 

The one thing the program doesnt 
have, and ifs a strange omission consid- 
ering its title, is a direct way to save a 
24-bit image. This is strange considering 
the fact that il actually renders in 32-bils 
{it has an 9-bit Alpha channel for effects). 

CONCLUSION 

Catigari is very good for quickly creating 
and rendering a scene, but the eventual 
output is not up to the standards of a ray 
tracer, Having said that they're not 
THAT far short eifher. It is by far the 
easiest program to use, and that in 
itself might make you want to give il 
serious consideration, 
Compatible: An 020 orm higher 
Amiga with a 6B8B1/2 
maths co~pro and a 
hard drive. 




£ 



E 



il 



A 



<3><a> 




What about.,.? 

CALIGARI BROADCAST 

£399.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 

Far the real 3D power users, Catigari 
Broadcast \aktt 'lip where Catigari 24 
leaves nil, 

The two programs share a verv similar 
user interlace, so upgraders won't have la go 
back lo basics. However It also includes a 
who l« bunch of e»ira animation features 
including motion blur, acceleration and 
deceleration and the option to animate a 
deformation. 
Octree have also addressed Ihe ridiculous omission in Ihe earlier product by giving 

Caligari Broadcasts ability to save 24-nit tiles without tk palaver of rendering Id a null 

bailer then converting via an Image process* r. 

The program also provides improved scene display on AGA machines as well as 

Increasing the sophistication of Its alien tile import and eiport options. 

CONCLUSION 

Catigari Broadcast is an exceptionally powerful product and its high price lag reflects mat 
fact Thanhs to the way it renders, it can draw pictures op to 40 limes lasler than conven- 
tional ray tracers. In America it originally retailed lor S1995.00 a.nd even al that price it 
won awards left, right and centre. AW Video magazine said that il 'had the test user inter- 
lace of any 3D package prieerj under $50,000' and it's impossible lo deny the llewhilityor 
Iriendliness of its front end, The program contains numerous unique le alines, and bears 
serious consideration it you're leaking at professional 3D work. ^uk 

Compatible-: An 020 or higher Amiga with a 68881/2 maths co-pro and a Ql*&$ 
Hard Drive and 4Mb RAM. %^^^i 








It's exlremely easy 10 change an objKla arlenHwn, and equally «**V »<* ™™ the- wlewere 
penpectiYS. 




Vgg tar include I shape in yaw 3D wtn-KJ Ov »i"ipiy tucking on th* one you requir* from ttia lis! 
of primitives, shown he* a. 



This I* one of Ih. demoa Included *rt the disks. It cNy lakes 15 HcOnda to render in Hill mode, 



GraphiCS AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 



What about...? 

XCAD 3000 

£386.58 - Digital Multimedia - 081 977 1105 



■-^^■pi-ii 




XCAD nan convert your 3D drawings into Tl 
ah jacl 1 ilea 1or rendering via a ray tracing package 



Dranrnuj has tee it Braced ink 
Hie 20th century thanks in 

Computer Aided Design pro- 
grams such as AutoCAD nn 
PC, till the Amiga's own Xi~ 
3BQB\u*A blows away anytl 
the PC has to offer. 

JfWO is a 3D drafting, pack- 
age. II consists ol a 20 module 
where you actually draw (he 
components el pur image, and 
a 3D module where Ihe compo- 
nents are linked la form a irue 
3D atlject. Ql course, it you 
require 3D, the program is 
uperb in only two dimen- 

Allhoughil is capable ol 
outpulling liles in the formal of 
"~i popular ray tracing pro 
«. XDl (J is different in thB 
, that il constructs images 
and 0B|Ects. 

It is ralherlike a structured 
innlool. where each ofjieel 
consists of control points and 
lines. These images are placed 
on the page using a rather cum- 
bersome command system 
where a number ol characters 
" typed to specify tine type ol 
and followed by mors 



Have you considered...? 

PIXEL 3D 
PROFESSIONAL 

£1 99.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION ■ 081 543 3500 

It's all very well using ray tracing and 3D programs to render all these dramatic objects, 
trouble is you've rjot to create the damned things firs!. PtteflD le Is you cheat. 

In lad Piie! 3D Professions! performs two very useful foes: h converts 3D objects from 
one object format to another {Imagine to Sculpt lor example} II also leu you create 3D 
Dbjecl liles Irom ?D bit-maps and fonts. 

The program is very easy In use, just select load and once you've given a File name the 
program will automat! cally delect what formal lh« f i I e I s In . II you 're us iog the prog* a m for 
format conversion, select save and you'll be olTened a choice ol fourteen riinerent output lila 
types. Having selected one, the program lakes care of everything else lor you. 

II you choose to load a bif-map. the program- will immediately convert it into its own 3D 
object format, Initially, the object is flat, but using the eilrude option you can quickly add 
depth to il. You can even round off Hie edges Willi fire bevel option. 

II you're using the program to create 3D fell Bring, you can type using any bit-mapped 
fonl jalmough point sizes per 40 are recommended). The program can then perform the 
same conversion and extrusion functions upon your text as il would on any other bit-mapped 
Image. Although it can be difficult to acquire bit- mapped fonts of this sire, some ol Ihe desk 
top publishing packages come with conversion programs to convert scalable lonts Into ordi- 
nary tail -mapped ones. 

CONCLUSION 

Pitet 3D Prote$$ioiwl\$ easy to learn and ten lo use. Some of Ihe operations are very time 
consuming, and it would have been nice to see some kind of indicator so ttial you could tell 
ihat the program hadn't crashed (which it did on a couple of occasions), A valuable, 
hut rathe r costly program wh ich wi II be a usete I a ddilian to Ihe 3De r' s arsena I .^^"-K 
ol tools. Compatible- Any Am iga with at least 1 Mb Ch i p and 1 H b Fast fl AM . T^Mp 



m 



d aa these produced by 1he 
si tMpirnsivHt business system. 
4CfB user interlace loaves b lot 
be desired. 



iracters to indicate ils parame- 
i. This system is exlremely 
gamly. especially considering 
j Am iga's wonderful WIMP envi- 
nment. II you have a graphics 
'if el. you can execute many ton- 
I fund ions using thai instead. 

J Drawings may be built up Iram 

1 a sari es ol laye rs whi c h can be 

ed ited independently of each other . 
1-1 The program supports a totally 
excessive 1 DO million layers, although I don't suppose you're likely lo ever need many mare 
than 9B million ol Ihose! 

XCAD 3060 can also import and export Industry standard DXF files, so you can convert 
you r wo rk to run on those lesser PC packages If you so desire . 

CONCLUSION 

XCAD 3036 Is guile simply the best 30 [trailing package that money can buy for a home or 

mini computer. Dt course you 
could go out and spend tens -n 

of thousands on a completely Z 
dedicated system, but eonsid- "" 
enng the fact thai on an 
accelerated Amiga XCA 
taslttlt\ar\ AutoCAD du 2 
486PC, why would you r 
to'' II you need lo exebg 
drawings with the rest ol 
world, this is your best 
uplion. 

Compatible: Any Amiga' 
2Mb RAM. 95% 

TtiB program consist* ol a 2 
*nd 30 drawing editor. 
o*»* it lor 2D dra 




I^^^^BBTaaai - '"•SSI f 





You can choose to view your objects as 
wireframe, solid or s-olld colour Image*. 






TO ^Miga«rftrfta 







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Mt* us r ^jsr t ^ 




- 


f - 



Vou tan type in any lexl uaing a bit-mapped 
font. Il can msn be e*ti uded Into |hre* 
^imvmioni and given colour It you require. 



47 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 GfaphJCS 



GRAPHICS BOARDS 

As wonderful as the Amiga's graphics are, ft «qh wan f fg gtfrf mflf £ tfigfl g SplS$lt Ot COlOtlF tO yOUl graptlJCS, ttietl 

if you want to enter the world of broad- ' »„_(.:„- L MaH f 

cast quality graphics, your going to need ugy '// eVCfttuaify WSttt tO COnStdBf pUrCfiaStftg 3 24'Uit (jrajWHCS flMfft 

to upgrade to 24-bit. The obvious way to . . ^ „ Mi _ . 

do thi & is with the aid gt a graphics board of Heres an essential guide to nie oesi ooartfs around,., 

which there are an ever increasing number, 



HARLEQUIN 

FROM £800 PLUS VAT - AMIGA CENTRE 
SCOTLAND - 0896 87583 




Graphics professionals expect 
their hardware to be of the 
best possible quality and 
pretty damn fast too. Many 
boards are unable to deliver, but one 
in particular has been proving itself lor 
years. 

I am talking, of course, about 
Harlequin from Amiga Centre 
Scotland {ACS). Launched In 1991, it 
quickly established itsell as the 
Amiga's best graphics card. It may not 
be able to bend over backwards and 
do the spectacular tricks that some 
other cards can do. but what it does 
do it does exceptionally well. 

the- Harlequin isa3£-oH frame] 
butter. That means that it will hold and 
display a 24-bit image as well as pro- 
viding an a-toit atpha channei. 
Because ihe Harlequin plugs into a 

48 



Zomo II slot and not tha video slot, 
you'll have lo provide' a separate mon- 
itor for its display. Almost any monitor 
can be used, such as Commodore's 
popular 1084. 

The board has three major selling 



points, the most irnportanl of which is 
its broadcast quality output. The RG& 
socket on the back of the card gives 
an output that even the BBC would be 
quite pleased with. II you've ever seen 
ACS at a Video or Graphics exhibition 
then you may have noticed a wave- 
form monitor on their stand. This is a 
professional piece of equipment which 
shows engineers exactly how clean 
Ihe Harlequin's output really is. This is 
incredibly irnportanl if you intend to 
use it tor broadcast applications. 
The speed of the Harlequin's 
hardware is the second reason why 
it's so popular. The supplied 
slideshgw software provides many 
wipe effects in real time and the hard- 
ware can even play partial screen 
24-bit animation. The clever thing 
about the hardware is that yew can 
select from many different screen res- 
olutions, from 740x576 up to 
91 0x576, all in 32-bit. On the 
Harlequin 4Q0Q model you can have 
two hardware buffered 32 -bit screens 
or up lo Si* S-bit screens. In the 6-bit 
mode you can use colour cycling lo 
bring olherwise static images to lite. 

CONCLUSION 

Commercial software support for the 
Harlequin is also at professional lev- 
els. Its 24-bit display is directly 
supported by AOPro, Rmai3D. Viab, 
Imagemastsr, Cstigan Broadcast and 
Sympatica. This highlights the fact 
that it you're serious about computer 
graphics you should look upon the 
Harlequin as a most serious and 
highly professional graphics solution. 
Definitely quality at its best. 

Compatible: Amiga 2000/ 3000/ 
4000. A last 32 bit processor and 
at least 5Mb RAM rec- 
ommended. 




The essential 
accessory 

Undoubtedly the best reason tar buying the 
Harlequin is because ot TVFamt. This addi- 
tional piece at software costs around EHB 
and presents yuu with a lor mi (able array of 
Artist's tool's and other pai nting facilities . 
Because the Harlequin uses. the Zarru slul. 
which is much lasler than Ihe video slot, 
painting funclians are very last indeed. 
FVPafof has an encelleot airbrush which 
gently blow? paint in almost almost Iranslu- 
cant layers onto hie semen. Surprisingly, 
the program Is as last and llemule as Ihe 
expensive high-end! professional Quanlel 
Painllmi system, a stand-alone art tool 
used in the broadcast fraternity! 

JVPaiai'K currently 31 version 2 and 
gives complete control over the VLah frame 
grabber, This means you can grab live video 
frames directly into TWaMflor manipula- 
tion! 



The ones who 
started it all 

Xi Electronics Ltd. is a small independent 
electronics design company based in 
Scotland, who some-times undertake rather 
unusual work - they once contracted For 
the design of an orange counting machine! 1 

They started life in mid 1989 (origi- 
nally trading as 813 DP Electronics) 
manufacturing computer peripherals, one 
suecesslul pro [eel being a fast SCSI inter- 
lace for direct to disk recording an Ihe 
Atari ST. 

In June 19911 8BDP Electronics con- 
tracted lo design a 24-1 It frame buller lot 
the Commodore Amiga. The result, 
released in February 1991 , was Ihe ACS 
Harlequin 32- bit frame bullet. Xi then 
moved on to other nan- Amiga design work 
hul decided to revisit Amiga 24 hit-graph- 
ics in February 1992, which led to the 
independent development by XI of the 
Harlequin Plus, which was officially 
launched al Ihe Format '93 show In May. 

As a result of the experience gained 
developing 24-bit graphics boards, and 
other contract video design work. Xi's 
emphasis has shifted inwards mid-range 
video hardware centred on Ihe Amiga, taut 
they are still currently undertaking design 
work on other niallornis. 

Xi's design philosophy is lo ■concen- 
trate on gelling the basics fight'' rather 
than offering a myriad of spurious (and 
often flaky) bells and whistles. Some 
would say they have been very suecesslul 
in achieving this aim. 






You can't use Software this Powerful, § 
and produce Documents this Good. . . ! 



isj£ 



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1 Se/77/flar ? 



If you're looking for a quality Word 
Processor/Publisher that performs as 
well as this, you may well start by 
marching through PC and Apple™ 
Macintosh™ software catalogues. 

Even then though, you probably 
won't find a program that will 
combine the very best in Word 
Processing and... easy to use 
integrated DTP type facilities. 

You certainly can't find 
software for your Amiga 
that's capable of all this... 



Unless, you buy an expensive PC or Macintosh™ 
a high priced Colour PostScript™ Laser Printer, 
and a complex, costly Desk Top Publishing Package... 




...or Can You? 

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AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 Graph J CS 



Because o1 its medullar de*ign, 
Op.nlVisipn cnnhce-Hpande-d by 

plugging In hardware modules. 




OPALVISION 

£599 - INDI - 0543 419999 



OpalVision holds many 
promises and opens new 
doors for those who have 
already bought it. Invented in 
(he far off land of Australia by 22 
year old Gary Fayner, this graphics 
board is almost unique in what it can 
offer you. 

It'$ a smalL neally constructed 
board which can be expanded 
through its modular design. The main 
board, called the motherboard, pro- 
vides a full 24-bit paietle and gives 
you a true 16.8 million colour display 
with an 6 bit alpha channel. The 
maximum screen resolution is 768 x 
580 pixels but il can also provide lo- 
res and nen-mterlace modes just as 
the Amiga does. 

OpalVision has a single RGB out; 
put socket which connects directly to 
your monitor. Two monitors aren't 
necessary because the Amiga's 
video output is genlocked with 
Opalvision and everything comes out 
through the single RGB socket. 

Amiga graphics can be superim- 
posed on top of OpalVision graphics 
or placed underneath, Because of 
the inclusion of hardware stencils 
you ear* even sandwich Amiga 
graphics between two layers of 
OpalVision graphics! 



The motherboard has a 
Microcode VLSI processor which 
provides a fair amount of real-time 
hardware shenanigans such as 
scrolling, fading and various palette 
tricks. With this kind of power youd 
expect the bundled paint package to 
run at InterCily speeds. Sadly this 
isn't the case. The video update is 
slow at the best of times, and stamp- 
ing down brushes in hi- res gives you 
a brief moment to run out and put the 
kettle on. 

Third party support 

OpalVision currently eg hies bundled with 
the most excellent rat tracing pa c bag*. 
imagine 2, which lets you see rendered 
scenes via OpalVision s 24-rjil display. 
Direct support from oilier commercial 
packages include such goodies as AOPto, 
flea f30 and tmageFX. 



PAINTING SUCCESS 

The shear number of features 
jammed into OpaiVisiori's paint pack- 
age, galled OpalPaint, is outstanding, 
Despite the slow response of the 
hardware in higher resolutions, the 
results which can be achieved are 
stunning to say the least. 



This praise for OpalPaint doesn't 
go unjustified, With around 50 differ- 
ent drawing modes. 7 types of pens 
(including airbrush, pencil and water- 
colour}, 3 kinds of stencils, user 
definable paper textures, and a rub- 
through facility, il certainly gives you 
everything you'll ever need from a 
paint package. 

The best news is that OpalPaint 
is absolutely free and comes bundled 
with other software as part of the 
complete package. OpalPaint is cur- 
rently on revision 2.2 and updates 
are freely available. 

MORE SOFTWARE! 

Other software includes an impres- 
sive animation playback program 
which gives lo-nes B bit, up to 24-bit. 
animation at around 25 frames per 
second. Animalions can be made up 
from any series of IFF frames, such 
as the output from Imagine, R9aS3D, 
Vista Pro, or AOPro. 

OpaiPresents is another free 
package which lets you produce a 
show reel of your 24-bil OpalVision 
images, You get to choose from 1 6 
different wipe effects and can overlay 
Amiga graphics on lop if you like. 
OpalHotHsy is a conlrol program 
which runs as a background task, 
The function keys are used to toggle 
Amiga graphics over or under 
OpalVision graphics or sandwich 
Amiga graphics in between 2 layers 
of OpalVision graphics. 



FLIGHT OF FAN- 
TASY? 

As I mentioned earlier, OpalVision 
can be expanded in steps by adding 
various hardware modules. There 
are fhree of them priced between 
E600 and £1 000 and these includes 
a 19" external production switcher 
taking 9 video and 10 audio inpuls. 
It'll generate all kinds of wipes and 
effects before throwing the results 
out as composite, YC, or YUV, 

The Roaster chip, according to 
OpalVision's marketing guys, can 
take several video inputs and wrap 
them around a sphere, complete wiih 
a light source in real lime. Coupled 
wilh the ChromaKey functions. 
OpalVision is promising to make the 
Toaster look as otd as il really is. 
Don't forget, OpalVision is an RGB 
machine which works in PAL and 
NTSC, whereas the Toaster can only 
work with the NTSC video standard. 



So there you have it. The mother- 
board, bundled with some excellent 
software and the promised options to 
expand into a complele video pro- 
duction suite, make the OpalVision 
system look very sweet indeed. 
Compatible: Amiga 2000/3000/ 
4000 with Hard Disk and r 
at least 1Mb Chip RAM i^J^^ 
and 2Mb Fast RAM. 



50 



r 



You Can Now. . . with New 

Final Writer" 




Put Your Finger on the Buttons of the 
Ultimate Amiga Word Processor 







f„ ,, -. _ From the publisher of the acclaimed Final Copy II coflkes its 
FiftQLV. — new companion. Final Writer - for the author who needs 

even more! If you already use an Amiga Word Processor, it 
won't include the complete and comprehensive array of fea- 
tures found in this latest addition to the SoftWood family. 
Can your Word Pmtssnr... 

Ouiput crisp PostScript 1 '- 1 Con! outidoes oa fflrj graphic printer 
(not just expensive lasers), and was n supplied with over 1 10 
typefaces? Import., scale, crop, view on screen and ouiput 
<ruetured EPS clip-art images (Final Writer is supplied with it hundred), again, on any 
:r'.' Also create structured graphics und rotate them along with text to any angle, giving 
ww DTP quality presentation 1 Provide a huge range of printing options leg, thumbnails. 
ng. crop marks etc. on PostScript 1 * printers.! and fulfil other advanced Word Processing 
•fictions easily such as automatic indexing, table of contents, table of illustrations and 
MNaogruphy veneration'! 1 With Final Writer, this 
w/'m is no* available to you 

■• alone with a list of fea- 

,4„„„. tares lhat just goes on 
maginptectmi ■,'..?■, and on. We know ifiai 
wall be impressed by this revolution in Amiga 
Word Process] ng, hut don't be put off by it's 
jdvwced capabilities. With its complement of 
«*r definable Command Buttons and Superb 
VlmuaL Final Writer is simply one of the easiest 
■• .ram-, io learn and use, 



Final Writer is nut just ;i one-off product... 

SoftWood are acknowledged as the World's leading software company publishing 
for the Amiga and no other system. So. if Final Writer exceeds your current require- 
ments - whatever your Document Processing needs, whatever your Amiga - 
SoftWood will still have the Perfect Package for you~ 

Pen Pal or Final Copy II and 
Proper Grammar IL.a Complete Range. 



Once you become a registered SoftWood user, you'll gain 

access to unlimited free UK technical support (others often charge 

you or don't provide support at all) and preferential upgrades to future 

versions of these and other exciting new products being developed right now. 






□ 

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SoftWood 

ij^JMJsJmJMJHJ^MSIS 

Quality software for your Amiga 



If you've outgrown your existing package ask 
about our 'trade up' options from your ^ - 

current Word Processor (other . • ' Ji? 

publ i sbers' W P"s are * ' %J)& n 

eligible too). s-j*>%&* 



y- 1 



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SoftWood Products Europe 

New Street Alfreton Derbyshire DE55 7BP England 
Telephone: 0773 836781 



Facsimile: 077.1 831040 



% 



Available from all good dealers ui. contact us for a list of nationwide stockists 

\i\ \f$<nim()m mmf ii n" ■: ■.' :.'i iflj '■■ r ™, f.if.OE. Ait rmAeao/tf St few* (rt!j«l Hi (toi n- 

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AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 GraphlCS 




AVIDEO 



PRICE: £299 CONTACT: HI Q LTD, 081 909 2092 



Upgrading to 24-bit graphics 
needn't be as expensive as 
you may think, AVideo is an 
internal option and can even 
transform an ageing A500 into a 
spectacular 24-bit machine. 

Acquiring 16. -8 million colours on 
an Amiga, equipped with rtie old 
4096 coiour chip set. can dramati- 
cally increase your machine's life 
span, Photo realistic images can be 
displayed on Workbench in resolu- 
tions of 724 X 566 without any fuss, 
and A Wee can even run 12 bit ani- 
mations up to 25 frames per second I 

The price you pay for such an 
upgrade is Ihe loss of any warranty 
you have left on your machine. 
Considering an estimated 99% of 
machines which can work with 
AVidso have no warranty left, I don't 
see that as a problem! 

INSTALLATION 

Regrettably, you've got to pull the 
Amiga's Denise chip out of its socket 

TV paint to 
the rescue! 

The only palm package thai you can get 
lor AVideo is TWaint. There's nothing 
wrong wilh thai, TVPairrt is a lop notch 
paint program. However, after spending 
E30D on a budgel 24-bil board, you 
shouldn't expect It spend £600 on a painl 
package lor ill 

If you do go ahead and buy AVideo 
with TYPml, you'll toe glad to know thai it 
runs at a generous speed and using it can 
be quite pleasurable. Perlormante is 
almost as good as JV faint running on the 
Harlequin! 1 



52 



in order lo plug in AVideo- It's only a 
small board which plugs into 
Denise 's IC socket and Denise gel* 
to piggy back on top of the AVideo 
board. 

The way it works is quite interest- 
ing. AVideo intercepts ail of the video 
information that would normally gel 
passed onto Denise. it then cun- 
ningly encodes its own 24-bit 
information before releasing the data 
back into the Amiga's system. 
Because the old Amigas were never 
intended to process more than 12 bit 
graphics, you can only view 4095 
colour AVideo images coming out of 
the Amiga's RGB port. 

To gel all of Ihe 1 6.8 million 
colours you need to connect 
AVida-o's own RGB connector up to 
your monitor. If you inslall it inside an 
A500 you'll have to chisel a few 
inches off the back of your casing, 
but as I said, you probably don't have 
any warranty left anyway! 

Just like Opaltrision, IV24 and the 
FrameMachine, AVideo combines its 
own graphics with the Amiga's so 
you don't need a second monitor, 

THE SOFTWARE 

AVideo comes with about 7Mb of 
software! Sadly thai doesnl include a 
paint program because the one it did 
have was awed. The reason for that 
is simple. The paint program was an 
absolute wasle of time and was as 
slow as a number 79 bus travelling 
from Paris to Cairo, being putted by a 
mule that canl map read. Yup, it was 
that bad! 

The senous software includes 
A VTune which tunes AVideo's dis- 
play in with your Amiga and another 
program simply called AVideo. This 



runs in the background and acts as a 
server. It's only necessary if you 
want to view 24-bil images through 
Workbench. AfCmcfis used to bring 
up a file requester prompting you to 
select an imago to display. 

KEY IT THROUGH 

AVideo images can only be seen 
through colour iero. This means that 
anything displayed from Ihe Amiga 
which has colour will appear trans- 
parent and reveal AVideo's display. If 
you have a genlock piugged into 
AVidqo's oulput then you can also 
use absolute black in AVideo's display 
as a key colour. The key colour will be 
replaced by whatever signal you have 
running through your genlock. 

In a nut shell, you can have three 
layers of video The Amiga's display 




is aiways on top wilh AVideo in 
between the Amiga and the live video 
from Ihe genlock running underneath. 
Plenty of fun can be had with this lay- 
ering technique and it even has some 
serious applications too! 

CONCLUSION 

When AVideo was released nearly 2 
years ago it was fantastic. The qual- 
ity and price were unbeatable. But 
now, any A500 owners considering 
buying it with TVPaint should under- 
stand that buying an A1200. hard 
disk, extra RAM, and Brilliance is 
actually a cheaper solution. Likewise, 
A2/300Q owners should investigate 
OpalVision as an alternative. 
Compatible: Amiga ^—^^ 

A5OQ/2OOQ/3OO0 with a IrTjtt 
Hard Disk and 4Mb RANL^**^ 





GraphiCS AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 




T 



FRAMEMACHINE 



£349.00 



FM PRISM 

£299.00 OR BOTH FOR £599.00 
HI LTD - 081 909 2092 



If digilising's your thing and real- 
time video grabbing and 
playback sounds intriguing, then 
don't you think you should be 
looking at Electronic- Design's 
dynamic duo? 

Frame Machine is a high quality- 
real-time' frame grabber. Most real- 
time frame grabbers will digitise an 
ima.ge in just 1/25 of a second and 
maybe another image- halt a sec- 
ond later. That's no good if you're 
planning to grab a section of video 
running from a VCR or a live cam- 
era. 

FrameMaehine is the newest 
Amiga video digitiser on the block 
and claims to be aWe to grab 25 
images per second, every second! 
Okay, it'll only do that in 256 
shades of grey providing you have 
a fast 030 processor, Even if you 
have a boring 66000 you can a till 
grab 18 images per second. But 
what if you want to digitise in 
colour? 



Grabbing 25 images per sec- 
ond in 24'bit colour takes a hell of 
a lot of data shifting, To do this, the 
FrameMachine compromises and 
grabs 1/4 screen video (180 x 128) 
in 24 -bit. Mat u rally, you can also 
play it back at the same rate il was 
grabbed at - 25 frames per sec- 
ond. However, you'll require the 
use of the FrarneMachine's 
optional partner. ■ 

rlW PRISM 

FM Prism may sound like a compo- 
nent in a radio receiver but instead 
it's a small board which plugs 
directly on to the FrameMachine, 
Since the FrameMachine grabs 24- 
bit images, il makes perfect sense 
that you should be able to view the 
images in 24-bils. Thai's exactly 
what the FM Prism does, 

Buying the Prism together with 
the FrameMachine dramatically 
enhances your system. You can 
monitor live video from either ihe 



built-in YC or composite inputs in 
real-time, full screen, in full colour 
and grab a frame at any point in 
time. Resolutions go up to 736 x 
580 pixels in YUV which can easily 
be converted to 24 -bit RGB and 
saved as an IFF image. Animations 
are saved in a new format called 
EDAM which can be played back 
as fasl as they were grabbed via 
the Prism, or converted to IFF. 

Connection to your monitor is 
very simple. You can either plug a 
second monitor into ihe 
FrameMachine to constantly moni- 
tor Ihe video' inpul and Prism 
buffer, or use a single monilor. The 
single monitor option superim- 
poses the Amiga's display over the 
FrarneMachine's using colour zero 
from the Amiga as the key colour. 




.,..,.:. -•J.-., 










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Electronic Design's dynamic duo of 
FramBMaelniiw and FM Ptiwn cH»r oustanding 
value l« money- 



CONCLUSION 

The results achieved from the 
FrameMachine are no less lhan 
amazing. Providing you have a 
good quality video camera or 
VCR, the images will be crisp with 
no grain and excellent colour 
fidelity. In my opinion, it's a wee 
bit belter lhan VLab for quality 
and convenience and the optional 
Prism display makes it a system 
which demands due respect. 
Apart from the light fil I had when 
installing the FrameMachine. I 
can really recommend ihe system 
and applaud its manufacturer's, 
Electronic-Design. 
Compatible: Amiga 
2000/3000/4000 with 
2Mb RAM. 



C^pK 



Software support 

The software that comes wiih Ihe FrameMachine is fairly si ra i rjhl forward and doesn't pre- 
sent any problems far first time users. Grabbing a Irame or a sequence ol live video 
requires nm mare lhan a few clicks with ihe mouse. A special processing, screen allows you 
to cut and paste sections Ironn an animation. Ifsa bit like digital video editing except 
sometimes when copying a clip it seemed to take lorewrl 

Ihe only negative thing about the FrameMachine is thai there's no painllng sollware 
available 10 support Prism's lovely 24- bit display. Instead you'll have to be conleil wilfi 
using fmageFXw Brilliance mi saving Ihe results as 24-bit, then load Ihe Image into 
Prism's buffer. 

I'm pleased to say that ADPte now comes with lull support lor both bus ol hardware. 
Single frames can be grabbed directly within ADPromi converted In RGB morE than twite 
as last as Ihe Frame Machine's native software! Saving 2f -bit images to Prism's butler is 
also very last within ADPre ani you can'l help Ih inking thai you've |usl spent the besl E6D0 
ever on your Amiga! 



» 



u 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 GfaphlCS 



Blimey, we use some faipwords. don't we?! We're not even 
sure what hall of Idem mean, so we hired a passing school 
kid to explain what Ihey all mean. 

• 03 D ■ An abbreviation tor Ihe Motorola 6503D process or, 
Fast processors such as these and Ihe 040 are necnm- 
mended fur use with most graphics cards. 

• 24-bil - Literally 24-bit just describes, an area ol memory 
available lor storage. However in toil ay's parlance It has 
become synonymous with y rapines. 24 -bits being lite 
amount required to store a single true colour pixel. This 
pixel may be any one ot 16,777. Z1S dillerenl colours. In 
other words, every single colour delectable by the human 
eye. 

• 32-Bit - in computer graphics rjnntSS-lltl is usually 
referred to as 24-bil with an 8-bit alpha channel. 

In computer hardware terms, 32-blts Is generally used 
to describe the amount ot memory that can be manipulated 
In a single operation. The higher the number ol hits, Ihe 
faster the machine, The Amiga 5 DC is only a IB-bit 
machine, whereas the A1200, CD32 and AiOQOs are all 32- 
blt computers. 

• AGA Stands for Advanced Graphics Architecture and is 
Ihe phrase used to describe the graphics system on Ihe new 
generation ol Amlgas, AGA graphics have numerous advan- 
tages including tar higher resolutions, and support of 
signiticanlly more colours on-screen at any onetime, AGA 
was originally dubbed AA, referring to Ihe set ol chips that 
provided Ihe extra features. Although Ibis term Is nn longer 
usee, you will sometimes hear references Id AAA ijra- 
nounced triple Ah machines. Although Ihese don t yet exist, 
they are apparently the next generation olAmigas which are 
expected to include lull 24-bil graphics. 

• Alpha Channel - An alpha channel is an extra area of 
memory which is used to store graphic templates (hat are in 
turn used to perform special ellects upon the main 24-bil 
Image. Usually consisting of an exira a hit-planes, it can be 
used as a 256 level lrever to give variable transparency lev- 
els to an image. 

• Anli-alias - The process where pi*els nl intermediate 

to I our and brightness are used to remove "jangles" from an 
image, Think ot it as a softening effect, 

• Bit - An ab brevi alien tor binary d ig it . A bit is the smallest 

unit ot computer memory. 




JARGON BUSTERS 



• Bit-map - A. bit map is ihe collective term for all ol the 

layers ol bit-planes that make up a computer graphic or dis- 
play. See bit plane below, 

• B It-Plane ■ Computer graphics a re essentially stored in 
memory as a grid ol bils where each bit represent a single 
pixel. By overlaying grids on each other, more colours can 
be represented In the computer's memory. A bit-plane is a 
Single layer of bits representing a graphic. 

• Composite - An encoded video standard which combines 
colour and luminance information in a single signal. 

• Demise - The custom chip which bandies screens and 
sprites from ihe original Amiga chip set. 

• Exlra-Hallh rite -A little used screen formal which dou- 
bles the maximum number ol non-U AM colours in low 

resolution from 32 to €4. It uses a form of trickery which 
simply duplicates the pa I she at bait Ihe brightness. 

• Frame grabber ■ A device which can digitise an image 
from a video source, 

• Frame store/nuller - A piece of hardware containing dedi- 
cated HAM wh Ich hold s a g ra ph i ca I i mage . 

• IFF - Stands lor Interchange File Format. IFF is Ihe stan- 
dardised format that the Amiga uses to store graphics and 

sound samples. It was developed in caniunclion with 
Electronic Arts beck in the computer's earliest days, it was 
developed so that all software and hardware manufacturers 
would be able lo work to a single date format which would 
allow Ihe free exchange ot graphics and sound between dil- 
lerent programs. 

• ILBM - Interleaved Bit-map. The technical term tor an IFF 

graphics image. 

• JPEG - Joint Experts Photographic Group. A group dI 
electronics experts who got together lo hammer out a stan- 
dard formal lor photographic compression. The name is now 
synonymous with a special type ol picture compression ide- 
ally suited to crunching digitised and real world images. 
JPEG compression can yield 75% disk and memory savings 
w ltd I ess man a 5% dro p I n i mage g ua I ity ; la r loo I Ittle lo 
actually notice the difference. 

• Key Col ou r - A n om i nal e d eo lour wh ich the computer Is 
particularly aware ol. Normally any graphics containing the 
key colour will be replaced by another screen or video 
source. Imagine it as a key hole effect. 

• HAM mode - Stands for Hold and Modify, and refers to a 
special trick thai is used in alt Amigas to increase the num- 
ber of colours that can he placed on the screen at the same 
time. Every pixel is represented by a value tor Ihe Red, 
Green and Blue components ol its colour. In ordinary screen 
modes, yuu can alter any ot these three values Irom one 
pixel lo Ihe next, but the maxi mu m nu mber of co I ou rs thai 
you can use on the screen at one time Is relatively low 1 64 
on n on-AGA mach Ines , and 256 on AGA ones |. In HAM mode 
/ou ca n on I v a Iter the va I ue of one comp onenl of a col ou r 
[theameunl of red. green or bltiellram one pixel lo an adja- 
cent one. Allhough Ihis restricts the way that you use colour 
g n. the screen, II I ncreases the on-scree n pa I Bile lo 4096 I n 
ion AGA machines and 256,QD0 on AGA ones. 

• MPEG - Motion Pictures Experts Group. The name ol 

another group of expels who got together lo come up with a 
standard for moving pi;ttire compression. Although their 
MPEG1 standard is widely used in computers such as CD 32 
and CD-i to provide Full Motion Video, the MPEG members 
are not satisfied with the quality, and have now proposed 
the MPEG2 standard for broadcast use. 

• NTSC - National Television Standards Committee. The 
American video standard with 525 lines at 6DHi, 

• PAL - Phased Alia mate Li nes . The European vl de o si an - 
dard lealUfino62S lines al 5«Mz, 




• Pi xel - Sla nds for Pi dure E le me fit (P iclu re s=Pics=Pix, 
geddit?). The computer screen is like a grid divided into tens 
of thousands of little dots. Each dot is called a Pixel and it's 
the smallest piece ol graphic information that you can con- 
trol on the screen. II the resolution dI the screen increases, 
the number ol Pixels also rises, and their individual size 
decreases accordingly. 

■ Re nd er - The process of constrocti ng a scree n im age 
Irom data stored in memory, Primarily used lo describe what 
happens when a 3D program starts converting three dimen- 
sional data into a real image. Also used to describe the 

process [usually by image processing software or graphics 
boards} ol autputtlng an image lo the screen. 

* Resolution - Is the general term used lo describe the 
number of pixels that make up a screen display, The higher 
the number, the smaller the pixels and the better the dis- 
play, 

* RGB - Red, Green, Blue. These are Ihe real components 
of video which, providing all ol Ihe equipment and cables 
deal with RGB gives Ihe best possible image. 

* YC - Luminance and Chrominance. (Sometimes called 5 
Video! Both parts of this encoded signal (brightness and 

c Did ur) are kept ap art which g Ives a better qua I ity i mag e 
than composite, but not as good as YUV or RGB. 

• YUV - Professional video equipment uses YUV rather 
than RGB. It's often referred to as component 

• lone- The name given to the Amiga s expansion slot. 
You should assume that most references refer lo Zorro II, as 
found on the A2uM/3000.''40uu'. i.3D0uY4D(H> machines have 
Zorro Hi which can take Zorro II cards.) 



54 






AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



Miuiiass ijo d js 



CADVlsion UK 

419 Richmond Road 

Twickenham 

Middlesex 

TW1 2EX 

TeL: 0S1 892 3637 

Amiga Centre Scotland 

Harlequin House 

Walkerburn 

Psebleshire 

Scotland 

EH43 6AZ 

Tel: 089 697 593 

Digital Multimedia 

Crest House 
102-104 Church Road 
Teddinglon 

Middlesex 
TW11 BPY 
Tel: 091 977 1105 
Fax: 081 943 3151 



If you want to get in touch with any 
of the companies we've mentioned 
in this graphics round-up, then 
you'll find their full names, 
addresses and telephone numbers 
primed below. 




M 






HIQ 


Micropacc 




176 Kenton Lane 


Unit 10 




Harrow 


Perth Trading Estate 




Middlesex 


Penh Avenue 




HA3 8SU 


Slough 




Tel: OB1 909 2092 


Berkshire 




Fax: 081 909 5665 


SL1 4XX 






Tel: 0753 551 8&e 




Hobbyle Computing 


Fax. 0753 551211 


^^^^^3 ^^ 


10 Market Place 




9: 9 


St Albans 


Radiance Software 




Hertfordshire 


2715 Klein Road 




AL3 5DG 


San Jose 


■^k 


Tel: 0727 856O05 


CA 95148 
USA 




Impulse, Inc. 


Tel: 0101 403 270 7420 




8416 Xerxes Avenue North 






Brooklyn Park 


SCALA UK LIMITED 




MM 55444, USA 


Mill Studio 




Tel: 0101 612 425 0557 


Crane Mead 




Fax; 0101 612 425 0701 


Ware 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^™ 




Hertfordshire 


Electronic Arts 


Indi 


SG129PY 


90 Heron Drive 


Unit 1 


Tel: 0920 444294 


Langley 


Ringway Industrial: Estate 


Fax: 0920 444230 


Berkshire 


Eastern Avenue 




SL3 8XP 


Lichfield 


Silica Systems 


Tel: 0753 549442 


Staffordshire 


1-4 The Mews 


Fax: 0753 546672 


WS13 7SS 


Halhertey Road 




Tel: 0543 419999 


Sidcup 


Entertainment International 


Fax: 0543 41 8079 


Kent 


677 High Road 




DA14 4DS 


North Finch ley 


Integra mes Ltd 


Tel: 081 309 1111 


London 


14 Smedley Street 




N12 


Clapbam 


Software Business 


Tel: 081 343 9143 


London 


Cromwell Business Centre 


Fax: 0B1 343 7447 


SW4 6PF 


Mew Road 




Tel: 071 738 8199 


St Ives 


First Computer Centre 


Fax: 071 499 7593 


Huntingdon 


Unit 3 




Cambridgeshire 


Arimley Park Court 


Meridian Distribution 


PE174BG 


Stan rang ley Road 


East House 


Tel: 0480 496497 


Leeds 


East Road Industrial Estate 




LS12 2AE 


London 




Tel: 0532 319444 


SW19 1AH 




Fax: 0532 319191 


Tel: 081 543 3500 






as 




H>OL. and »s female companion 
AMI. face a challenge which wilts 
M krees of the toughest Nina's in 

« stale of the an PLATFORM 
■EMM ACTION win.;- KHOOLand 
ir. : - ' MENTAL BLOCK in- 

tree «fi»ir, out 10 wipe maiiiri»iitjn 
*-i»n :he fan! or existence. Playing 
root uf ZOOZ rgfit your *ay through 
MSHE iv assiue levels ol hugely varied 
no er^oyahin gamepijiy. Meet noon. 
»t«0 neaded alien dog onti ui-:*i 
i'-Sid. the other n ghly Intolljflfit 




r «*furH lncludo 

• Piav either ZOOL Of the an re* 
£001 eac n with Weir own special 

•Mngtnt. 

• * »i()e variety Of highly intclligC-1 
e"em"es. 

• . vanee power ups and 

I SitllBB. 

• :den bonus roams and secrei 

• HJ Kximl n and 3 Choice of in 

tarv tunes 
41 Mnc huge ktnl s 
*w* efussic aeguri to 1992 s ffiersi 
f Amiga game". 



on 


1* 


§ 






^* ,■:•.-. 





Clnly wlwi Villi l.ik* OMKKri :>l K2U in 
.11. STRATEGY game will yliu 

underhand wh« real ffessurfi Is. 
Tin- reran Ensure has. eipanaec). 
Mankind and ate A *r, races are 
struggling to maintain peace In Ihe 
lace ol dwindling resources. Is 
destruction inevitable, 
f chj are the Commander o1 the 
mission to explore and exploit KMO 
but ear you buid a successful and 
peaceful colony deep in the recesses 
of space, or will greed and aggression 
bring the empire down. 



kmi rwnn id? 

/ ■, LaWTIt !!■■> *" 

f-~\ " __^P" » c SCI 

■rlj . N "~~" ~ 9HfH* 1 1 


tin 


m -& •* 1 


ZJ 




F*atui*» iiKludv; 

• *j dWfonmt Ahen li'e lorms. 

• a orflerem types Df space crafts. 
& 1 6 different 1ypes of vieapons and 

shields. 

• Fully designable asteroid field 
Msrfaot, 

■ Highly miellgent enemy colonies. 

• l.i :: I'm • : building ■,n..ci..n... 

• a v»*r rsnae of eornpfei interactions 
to jrideisidnd and control. 




LEGACY OF SORASIL 



THE LittlC T OF SQHAHL IS a 

fantastic and huge world of 
adventure. The fabled land erf Rma 
has fallen foul of a mysterious 
plague . Choose a parly of intrepid 
adhtfiviurers from 8 would t» Heroes 
»Kt try m> return 1ne land to it's 
peaceful state. Battle your way 
through ID vast stages ugainsl # 
legion or highly intelligent Km 
End**** touts of solid and far 
nsSGhiruJfamr.. r il,|., 






DISPOSABLE HERO 



Get thai irigge r <inger ready for an 
ARCADE SHOOT -EM UP that taxes 
up the genre vmcro others have 
feared (o tread. The Free Worlds lie 
technologiMtty bankrupt. An Alien 
tyr$nriy tfrnfiftsns mankind As a 
Certified D-rlERO ft s your task to 
hgh| your w*y through 6 levels of 

norvstoo head temping linger 
swealmg eje^iall racing lhuu b 
OusiHig, ne*v* jangling sction to 
pe*KMra«e the Alien sironghOM*. 



PREMIER MANAGER 2 



PREMIER MANAGER tianstornwd 
the lace of tTfUTEOr foolball 
management games with H's 
accessible and enjoyable game style. 
It has remained in the charts since 
it's release late in 1992. And now, 
ntEMIER MANAGER 2 is read, with 
* whole host o< added leatures . 
H*nS you tht msMviijenwnt skills to 
turn arcHiffi* and imiwvt yOur tpSdis 
performflnte? 

Get rei>dy to blow the »«M5im on THE 
lr»U>3ll g*me for 1993. 





Features Include: 

• 10 perilous quests l.o be completed 

• Smnnirig 3D ktOflHafC displEiy. 

• Simple paint aw. click InUfTat* 
■ B heroes, all wi(h s|«-::i.n ■;■ skills 

• Eerie sound f. and tunes. 
V Fully self mapping. 

■ft you MravTt c»si\e.nging gamepiay and 
a flame mai'sgoir^g Jo fast you can't 
go tat H'ong witfi r.':vs ". 

cu Aitiiga 



Fnalurei Include: 

■ kKtdt quality graphics, backdrops 
: k*iimation 

• Fully adjustable sound FX and m 
game tunes 

• Hundreds of weapon canf igurattons . 

• Mind blowing Mid le^e' and End 
level guardians. 

• Choice of assaull craft with Four 
levels ol difficulty. 

■Rrsf invwewforis? inhpahf fj'asl, 
WSSf. dodrrr' cfcath, guns, nrors- cream, 
twt ron and crcitsnmrtt! ' 
Tin Oh 



F4RtWW RKilMK 

• 1& playing formations with a 
pOying styles and 12 rnacoh tactics. 

• "legotiale wages, bonuses arc) 
contracts 

• Comprehensive barring system 
with eriangeabte inle>«*t r«tes, 

■ Ulp to M plws c«r tejm w«ll> 
i«ni( or ^ foiean 

• Set ticket p"ces and crowd control. 

• IMMEHATC ndtlnl possible it 
you're not up to the iah 

'Tfifs /eatly is Ifte oesf oils of at) Ine 
root* games. OuncUed f ogefrter and laio 
out on a gotten plate for you ". 
Tht One 




II 9RIPHICI AOFTWARE LIMITED. CARVER HOUSE, 3-4 CARVES STREET, SHEFFIELD tl IF 

11131 OREHLIN llirmci IOFTWARE LID, ALL tlOHf I IIIIIIEI. 



TEL 7*2 IMtll 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



Programming 



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PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 



If you've had enough of using other people's soft- 
ware, then the logical thing to do is to write your 
own. But how do you get started? Read on... 



We ail enjoy using programs 
wrilten by so-called 'pro- 
fessional' programmers. 
Whether you get your 
kicks from playing the latest games, 
dabbling wilh the latest paint pro- 
gram or (if you're very si range) 
knocking up a 'Profit & Loss' state- 
ment with the latest Amiga 
spreadsheet program. Bui how 
many times have you ever wished 
rat your favourite program had that 
extra feature lhal you really need? 
Problem is, programmers have to 
produce products that wall appeal lo 
a broad spectrum of users and so 
it's impossible for rhem to account 
for every eventuality. The answer of 
course lies in programming your own 
software. If you can't find a program 
that will do ihe job that you want it to 
do, then why not have a go at writing 
your own? 

Armed with a programming lan- 
guage, there's no reason 
whatsoever why you couldn't write 



anylhing from a game, a utility or 
even a serious program like n 
spreadsheet or a database. That's 
not to say that a programming lan- 
guage will write your programs for 
you. Far from it. In many ways, a 
programming language js a bit like a 
toolkit you'd use lo work on a car - 
everything you naed to perform any 
lype of work on a car is there, but 
that doesn't necessarily mean that 
you're a fully qualified molor 
mechanic once you've bought your 
toolkit. As long as you understand 
exactly what eacb tool is capable of, 
how you use those toois is limited 
only by your own knowledge. 

STEP BY STEP 

Don't let this put you off. though. It's 
a common misconception thai pro- 
gramming is difficult. Okay, if you're 
intending to write a program that can 
wrap a Hal 2D image onto a cube, 
then it's going to be difficult But then 
the difficulty comes not From pro- 



gramming such a utility, but under- 
standing how such transformations 
actually work. If you're prepared to 
put in the work to learn how to pro- 
gram, (hen you'll amaze yourself 
just how easy programming can 
really be! 

Sd what is a program? This may 
seem pretty obvious, bui very few 
people actually realise what a pro- 
gram really is. Put simply, a program 
is nothing more than a list of instruc- 
tions that tell the Amiga how to 
perform a given task as a series of 
stEps. Once again, there's a definite 
comparison to be made. Say, for 
example, you wanted to change the 
oil in your car. You'd start by jacking 
up the front of your car and then 
you'd place a drip tray underneath 
the car's sump lo catch the oil- Then 
you'd unscrew tha $ump screw to 
allow the oil to drain from the sump 
into the drip tray. Finally, you'd 
change the oil filter, replace the 
sump screw and top up Ihe engine 
with the new oil. So what's this got to 



A programming language is possibly the 
mosl powerM ul'iliHy yem tin buy lot your 

Amiga. Wi(h programming language! like 

aasemta&er. Blitz Basic and AMOS, you o»n 

BV»n writs you' own games ! 



do with programming"' Well, without 
even knowing it we've written a sort 
of program, Okay, so it's not quile 
assembtsr or even BASIC, but Ihe 
theory is pretly much the same - in 
order to get the computer lo perform 
a given task, highly detailed instruc- 
tions are given to it in the form of a 
sort at 'step-by-step' guide. 

COMMAND 
PERFORMANCE 

A programming language gives you 
a selection of commands, each of 
which does a particular job (prinl a 
string of text onto the screen, make 




5B 



Programming 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



a decision etc). On their own, they're 
pretty useless - siring thenn together 
lo form a program, however, and the 
results are a lot more exciting. 
Obviously there are limitations. A 
programming language, for example, 
only understands the commands that 
are built into it and even then the 
commands have to be entered using 
a strict syntax, 

Programming languages are a hit 
like human languages. Each 
achieves pretty much the same 
results, but all of them use different 
commands l hat the others cannot 
understand, The command in 
BASIC to print a line of text onto the 
screen is 'Print" and the command in 
'C to achieve the same result is 
'PrintfO' - pretty similar sure, but 
enier 'PrintfO' 'rile a BASIC listing 
and it won't understand it, If you buy 
a BASIC interpreter and feed it a 
simple BASIC listing prepared using 
a diflerent type of BASIC, however. 
it should (in theory at leastl) work. 
As you get deeper into program- 
ming, however differences to start 
to $how - the AMOS command to 
open a screen is 'Screen Open" 
whereas the HiSoft BASIC com- 
mand to open a screen is simply 
'Screen', for example. The core of 
BASIC remains the same, however 
- both AMOS and HiSoft BASIC will 
understand commands like 'Print', 
'Input' and 'Go-sub' etc, 



MULTIPLE CHOICE 

The Amiga certainly isn't starved of 
ite tare share of programming lan- 
guages. Most people start their 
programming careers with BASIC, 
bul there's no reason whatsoever 
why you couldn't learn to program in 
Pascal, "C", Forth, ARexx or even 
assembler, Even then, most Of these 
languages are available from several 
vendors - if you want a BASIC lan- 
guage, for example, then there's no 
fewer than four different packages to 
choose from! Even then, other ver- 
sions of BASIC can still be found 
floating around in the bargain basket 
at your local software store. 

So why are there so many dif- 
ferent languages available? Well, 
in an ideal world there would be 
only one programming language 
that could do everything but unfor- 
tunately this isn't the case - every 
programming language has its own 
particular strengths and weak- 
nesses. Take assembler, tor 
example. Everyone knows that 
assembler code runs faster than 
anything else, but learning to pro- 
gram in assembler is notoriously 
difficult. BASIC, on the other hand, 
is very easy to learn but BASIC 
programs don't generally run that 
fast. Languages like 'C and 
"Pascal' provide a good balance 
between the two, bul even then 
they're not that easy to learn and 
both require a lot more work to get 
the same results possible from 



Buyer's checklist 

Choosing (lis language that is right 1or you is very much a matter of personal lasts but it's 
also important to choose a language that is best suMed (a yd or particular needs, II you're in 
the market for a programming language, then it's worth taking lime out to ask yourself the 
following gueslions each time you considers package. II you fallow these simple guide 
lines, you won't go tar wrong. 

1 . Can il be used lo produce the sort nl programs I want to write? 

Pretty obvious this one, All programming languages have their own individual 
strengths and weaknesses lhal should be assessed, II you want a language that will 
allow you lo write lasl arcade games, lor example, then you want to make sure thai 
your chosen language can access the Amiga's custom chips at a hardware level. Speed 
is important loo, so there's little point in choosing a language thai produces programs 
lhal run at a snails pace. 

Some languages are geared! specifically towards hardware -level programming only, 
hut they're of little use if yon want to write sollware that makes use nl the Amiga's operat- 
in g sysle in routines . If you want lo produ ce applications software , you should thereto re go 
tor a language that will allow you to access them. 

2. Will I be able lorun my programs independently of Ihe package? 

Unless you're writing software for your own particular needs and yon haw no intention 
whatsoever ol sharing your programming gems, then make sure that your chosen package 
allows you to distribute your wares without breaking any copyright laws. Even if a program- 
ming language doesn'l Include a compiler, same oiler what is known as a 'Runtime 
System', lhal is, a specially cul down version of the interpreter thai will run your programs 
without infringing the publisher's copyright. 

3. Hit's a language I don't already know, how good II the documentation? 

Learning any new programming' language can be a hard slog II you don't already know 
Ihe language inside out. so It's important to make sure thai the manuals thai corns with 
Ihe package are up lo scratch. A good example of this is Blitz BASIC - it's a great lan- 
guage, but Ihe manuals bundled with the package are so bad that you need lo be highly 
technical to understand them. Even if the manuals are had, are there books available 
lhal will teach you the language? There are loads of books I ha twill teach you lo pro- 
gram in X , for example . 

4. Will it run on my system? 

Some programming languages require heaps or memory and a hard disk, so make sure 
lhal the language lhal you choose wilt run without problems on your particular system, 
AMDS Professional, lor example, works on a 1 Mb Amiga but you really do need more RAM 
to Mt tin mMt tran fl. 



BASIC Even opening an Inluilion 
screen can take large amounts of 
code - in BASIC, however, you can 
open a screen with a single com- 
mand! 

Be careful when buying a pro- 
gramming language too - if you want 
your programs to be 'stand-alone' 
(ttiat is, they run completely separate 
from Ihe programming language 



package), then you'll almost certainly 
want a compiler. A compiler is a util- 
ity that converts the programs you 
write into machine code programs 
that can be run by your Amiga with- 
out assistance from the package lhal 
you used to enter the program in the 
first place. Some packages either 
don't need compilers (assemblers 
convert code directly to machine » 



The good programming guide 

Just about anyone can learn to program, bul very lew people learn how lo program well- 
Mere are s couple nl guidelines thai will help you lo make your code not only easier lo 
understand, bul more elficienltno. 

1 . Adequately comment your code, 

You may understand how your cade works when you first enter It. but try returning to il aher 
a couple ol months and you'll lind It almost totally unreadable unless you add comments lo 
your code. By breaking up lite code and adding short comments lo each major process 
makes your code much more readable. What's mors, it's a good habit lo learn - II you gel a 
job as a programmer, your employers will Insist that your code is commented so lhal oth- 
ers can amend il in your absence. 

2. Use descriptive variable names. 

Using descriptive variable names causes no speed penalties whatsoever and can mike 
your code far more readable. For example, would you know what the variable L' holds? 

What about the variable 'NumberQlLives"? Gel the poind? 

3. Modular programming. 

If you lake a course in computer programming, Ihe one technique lhal will he drummed 
i nio you i s lhat ol M od nl ar prog ra mm i ng. Modular programming simply means that yd ur 
code is split into subroutines' that can be called over and aver again from dillereni points 
within your program. Nat only do subroutines save you the hassle of having to enter 1 he 
same section of code over and over again, bul it can also make your code more readable. 
Once again, make sure your subroutines have descriptive names f'Proc CflLCU- 
LATESCORE', lor example). 



Programming jargon explained 

Interpreter - II you use a programming language that doesn'l include a compiler, lb en Ihe 
only way that it can be run is for the la nguage lo 'interpret ' each I i ne as il g oes a I ong. 
Many dial pels ol BASIC use this approach -as Ihe interpreter reaches each line In your 
program, it translates it Into Ihe numbers that your Amiga understands. Once translated, 
Ihe line is then executed The real problem wilh an interpreter Is thai once il moves onlu 
the next line In a program, the translation it performed on Ihe previous line is forgotten. 
This creates speed problems if your program uses a loop as the interpreter has to re- trans- 
late Ihe same lines again each lime the loop is performed 

Compiler • A compiler is a program that fakes your program cade and converts it into a (or 
mat lhat can be understood directly by your Amiga. As a result, compiled programs can be 
run independently of the package used lo create them. Compiled code runs much faster 
than interpreted code because each line in your program is translated into machine code 
when the program is compiled. As a result, it doesn'l need Ic be translated line by line' as 
the entire program is stored in ils translated larm, 

Assembler - II you wanl to write programs lhal run as last as possible, then an assembler is 
the only choice. An assembler fakes programs written in 'assembly' language and converts 
them into machine code. Many contuse assembly language with assembly code -assembly 
code is nothing more than a human-readable form of machine code. Unless an assembly 
language program is 'assembled' into machine code, the Amiga will not understand il. 
Source Code • Soorce code is a jargon term for the leit tiles lhat you create in a text editor 
or a specialist editor which a programming language converts into the machine language 
instructions that Ihe Amiga can understand. 

Object Code - Object cods is a term lor a program lhal has been converted tram source 
code into a machine language program lhal your Amiga can understand, lo a human, 
object code is nothing more than a garbled mess of numbers. 
Debugger ■ if you find a 'bug' In one si your programs, an assembler allows you lo quickly 
b n d easily track il d own hy single sle pp i ng Ihroug h you r pro gram lo see the ellecl of each 
instruction. Once found, you can then amend your source code and either compile or 
assemble it again. 

Linker ■ In order for a c om pile d prog ra in to run , the comp i I er m usl attach to il a number of 
extra object files that gel your program running each time il is run. A linker lakes these 
files and tacks Hi em onto your object code. 

'Include' tiles - Built into every Amiga Is. a huge collection ol routines that are used by Just 
about any program lhal doesn't hll the hardware' is perform such lasks as opening screens 
and windows, handling gadgets etc, In order lo access these routines, you need to make 
use or what the Eechies call 'Include' files. ThesE include files contain definitions that lei! 
your program where Ihe ROM routines can be lound and haw they should be accessed 










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Programming 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



HiSoft Basic 

£49.95 -HiSoft -0525 718181 









HiSdT t BASIC Corvtlar Options 


Overfloy checks I 1 Ha 


Break checks J Ho 


Array checks |j No " 


Symbolic iJebiri | Yes ]\ ! ■ 
Error messages ] No 


int nunbers He 


vent checks ] Ho 


Shared I ibrary | ] Ma 

Workspace (Kbytes): til 

11 jx labets (jep nanuai) : Ltliii 


Var iablf check | Yes | 
Stack checks tic 
Uncterl ines ] No 




Conpile to | ""lOisk 




Coup i 1 e 


CWf«J 

ut*rt*P4U3-(iiz*>\2 
CK£»3 

x5tart-(nileJ-(siie)\2 
END SELECT 

Htirt=full_h*isllt-Sp«e-slart*PilH_JltlBht 

IF t»pe=e THEN 



HiSotl s BASIC programming language msy b* gmwing ralher iong in the ioolh these days, but 
il'e- f nil the only system trill Ii lully compatible wilh AmlgsBASIC, 

Still going strong in the face of such stiff competition as Blitz Basic 2 and 
AMOS Professional is HiSoft BASIC, a combined BASIC editor and compiler 
from the authors of Devpac. HiSolt BASIC is the only BASIC programming 
language thai fully supports such industry standards as Microsoft Quick Basic 
5 on the PC and (more ImpOiianl to Amiga users at least) Commodore's own 
AmigaBASIC interpreter. HiSolt BASIC can read source files from belli these 
languages and compile them into stand-alone programs without you having 
the bother of translating them first. 

HiSofl plan to release version 2 of its BASIC language system 'sometime 
after Christmas' although at the time of going to press exact specification-type 
details were non-existanl. When you consider that HiSoft BASIC 2 has been put 
on hold lime and lime again, even this release date seems somewhat optimistic. 
In the meantime, HiSoft still see the original release as a viable produel. 

Specification wise, HiSoft BASIC is certainly showing lis age. Although the 
speed of code execution is a wast improvement over Commodore's own 
AmigaBASIC interpreter [the language lhat HiSoft BASIC is based upon). 
HiSoft BASIC no longer cuts it as a serious option wilh the likes of AMOS and 
Blitz breathing down its neck. HiSolt realty should get version 2 
out onto the market if they want to be taken seriously. 



In the beginning*,. 

Unless you ve be en us ing Ami gas f or a nil muer of years, you may not be aware that 
Commodore used to bundle a BASIC prog ramming language wilh all Amiga;. Designed and 
written by Microsoft (the people behind PC programs llks 'Word' and Ifie PC? pathetic 
attempt a) a Workbench environment. 'Windows'). AmigaBASIC was a very slow BASIC 
interpreter lhat ottered fairly minimal support lor the Amiga's special capabilities 
Commodore eventually realised just bow naff AmigaBASIC really was ai.d Ihey eventually 
slopped bundling il with Armgas with the release otitis A5DB Plus and Workbench 2.0, 

AmigaBASIC wasn't the Amiga's hrsl BASIC language, however. Back In the days when 
the Amiga A1D0D was still Commodore's new baby, lbs machine was bundled Willi a BASIC 

interpreter Called AElasiC 
$ written by I he authors of 
AmigaDDS. MetaCamcD. 
Many veteran Amiga owners 
D still believe that ABasic was 
considerably better than 
Am i ija B AS I C 3 Ith oug h it too 
is no match lor Ihe likes ol 
AMOS and Blilz. 



Up until the release ol the 

ASM Plu*, tfii* N (he Bas.c 
language- Ihal was. bundled 
wllri all Amigaa. It was slow, 
underpowered and totally 
uul Qt d»l# - no wondet 
Commodore dropped il! 



AMOS Professional 

£49.95 - Europress Software - 0625 S59333 

Francois Lionel's AMOS has been floating around lor a few years now dur- 
ing which lime it has earned itself a formiddable reputation thanks lo its 
(until recently) unrivalled programming power. The original AMOS (now 
renamed AMOS Classic) was the first high ievei Amiga programming lan- 
guage to allow direct access lo the Amiga's hardware without having to 
spend hours writing code to set up the Amiga's cuslom chips. AMOS has 
moved on since Ihe onginal release with the arrival of two new versions of 
the language. Easy AMOS (a stripped down version ol AMOS Classic) and 
Europress' new flagship. AMOS Professional. 

Coupled with the recent release of the AMOS Professional Compiler 
(£35) which allows you to compile your AMOS creations into super-fast 
machine code, AMOS Professional still provides Ihe easiest to use and 
most powerful BASIC programming language available for the Amiga, The 
basic AMOS instruction set (which consists of over 700+ commands) can 
easily be eslended with the addition of language extensions such as 
Europress' own AMOS 3D (which allows you to add 3D graphics to your 
AMOS creations) and even PD extensions such as Turbo". 

The AMOS programming environment consists of a sophisticated editor 
wtiich allows you to edit your source code and then run (or even compile) it 
without having lo leave the editor, Europress also include a number of 
handy utility programs (or 'accessories' as they call Ihem) that make soft- 
ware development Ihal bit easier. These include a powerful object editor 
(for the creation of sprites, bobs and 'icons'}, a sample bank maker (pull 
together all your programs samples into a single file) and an AMAL Editor 
which makes writing programs in AMOS' powerful interrupt-driven animation 
language an absolute doddle. 

The spaed of AMOS code may not quite match Ihal of Blilz Basic, but 
l his is more lhan offset by AMOS' ease of use, accessibility and raw pro- 
gramming power. Pul simply, AMOS reigns supreme as the s^fffeh 
Amiga BASIC language. ^J^£ 



<L> 



h 4'aWH 



> / -iQGD^^ 



Dim HAPDAIA'XMAX.Y. 
Din C«R»S(4,l3i),E 

Global GADGETLISTO, 
Global »'*" 
Global " 



_„K=8 : bin mawuit/i) ; uLPXY=« : u£ 
R»S(4,n,S)>MCnOH(4 t 4.2),SqilARi:S(i3),BLCKS(25,2) 



' *** Load title Screen 

Hide On 

Screen Open 8, 128,288, 8, Lowes 

Unpack 9 To 9 

' Load Iff " 3DAC : JDAC , title" 

Paper t \ Pen 2 : Loaate 8,0 ! Print VERSIONS 

Titwp;B 

' Load "3»AC:HALLGrT' 
Hake Icon Mask 

For C=» To 1 

IN0UT(C,H=-1 : MMJKC,1)=-1 

Next C 

r -it Disc Forts 
Repeat 

CQUNTEIKvUWTCR+l 

AS=FontS<C0IMTER) 

If Instr(AS,"3DrV;.f0l.t"" 



EuroptBBS' recent lick of eommilnwnt lo 
AMOS i» rather disturbing but lhat shouldn't 
pul you art lh« language - il 5 still [ho r,isirsr 
(and one of Ihe rnoal powerful) BASIC lan- 
guages Hvailabl* on th* Amiga. 



61 






■ »"■ 




AhAlC A 

PUBLIC DOMAIN 
SOFTWARE 

89p 



SOFTWARE 
NEW TITLES 

tJ2n4 ELEVATION II - Can and miwhil paitMm reap. 
(i2CMDMlVIIMr.l.* Boulder lUili H rl>. iny hen! 
UHKl KIUMH vljf . Hnnd new i*n™ .-fl" ihk uitrtrfiHe reninu 
pukair fee Aimp nnidem uieTt.'nt mnsi pc*iilaTone4r.Hiu.l 
S9VSU" 11 DtaK&l SHED TKAHS - Paaari djdeBww usinjla. 
AGAchipteL -AL2UU ONL V' 

iilMi (iALAXY « Lm*i like CI«.tjih. Mm ^rJlaji t»cl 

ilnip NOT AKH-. 

I. 'I I ARE\ V [HH Hk'FkRi M* t. MANL'AL ■ BtMMM 

manual oa. dke AREXX prr«ia™™uj lafttlla|i. -NOTASDO'. 

Ci2c7 m.tM'K.vTKR ■ Trow U*hl CjeI" a* 1 *' "jib kiw» Jrsijwjr 

EM I HII 1)«£X5 FAVOURITES I- R) auaay *>inei"uh 

pkiurci. wind* aad nunu: w imp. a-|nnp lu 

l : !0B AMOS Nfflainafid imUKf i i.fl) - Crule WwMwnrt M 

ityle bra* end* Hit y<a* Aaa*. pruuimnes unhcul r ->' Lusslr Vim 

dr»i?n Hit screen wilh imami, hullnra «£.. wd uvr ihe mum Kdl 

■hi ihtniirnph. lead II aki AltiO^. 

<.:<■» SLAMaALL ■ Euiuriilk nuiHatnKnl turnout "" 

Hnmm 

T3MB\(1RMI.H HW) ]lKUKnHliT4*nHB*r«:. lie 

Ami£i Entail Fnmi LrHVi n Beer Vtn «U 

KM i I IkLINC EVJIW. ANIMATION - Darned n nx 

lUiuYuiitn uf j Shahac mflinc. 

I -i' IWKMIWl ri Bunnell ml'maiT n tviti Frfnna»i"Hnifi 

MA ."lill' Jjlfwiyra | In- -i -Ul.. -.iv." r.-: -ilk" III' i-nii-i -n 

Baa CtoMMLNICATE - Leimini «ol f« eiahi Imu of non-ver- 
bal .miuiuuiLuiiiini hkludinii si>ui lia-tfu^r. mii%r -.ndc. hruilt. vie 
E5h/E!" (3 IHSKJii AMFJCH'AN FOOTBALL - Mn*"rii*miil 
o* bar cunipk i ™ki jiia oraefka aied auk* dya antl, 
CiBMMrU IJ DISKS! I Hi- HIII.K - Brillum Ckvlf (none 1st 1 ur 
leayen. 

9W8ATVICMB vu sLIllfcSIHJW ■ H»"- ruiarti ..I ,l,flrir« 
nykianc- -^Hri-i* rum raiiim a lapantse cartooni. A30 V.^ihiJ 
SIN JURASSIC PARAl-A* - Biilluin JuledKw nf Kairy nciwn 
Daimauri v, iih added !?■■: infitnTHliim H QHb LmUUluiui£j. 
i;;7l JH.I.T QVEfT Hmhk Nitd 3D innmhrkmv^fcfuiilt 
E4TTK 4EUH*I Ijhv ctK^- 

L JIM niST EW3INE '*,! - Tt* am' PU wcrd proonKT j»fl p« 

km! liKUiiln fully inlmnH5l>p:IUho:ker. * rauit! 

I 'i - M'PEtVIEH'E* iM • SUdMbev emnr <** dimple* 

L.UH IIH'iPMii C4D lnv-sriir^K-i =*: ElanioCAIl and 

PnrtrtjT«r ('.Tn^xiirr Akfcd L>jii^n pr-i^rjjnmfi l<irFln-ln»iiL- 

propcOL V.Oxid. 

VKn AMlM PfLLNTKX IWH.TINE - CMC* OW p«ur 

MNLxch Ily vaw AJIK4 frnjenannmi pr«iif».** 

i. mca mvisi (ii i m ims vounn <-iwi m i »n 

UrnipUtfWpHK' flMllhiin Uri 1 uhl ^'JTJ l , TCrtMOft »hi(* M'J - llrm. 
IM KA<;E KSW *1 ■ OM imjiitnr m* New:. m]» W, =■'""> 

HflDi .Amifi DOSiunuiMiiili hr» plui ini».h n 

III-IK.%1 I ilk HKlt'li- Pfcndj-oCRan- ■ 

^I^*IP 4SK*|i|.l ■ K Ijir. trk&lm^ltI , ^■■A'^ :; ^Iilil>" 

dJIOTUlkMI. 

U.KH E.USVC AH ' V I.Qa - IV K"i BtWOWI HpKbUHn 
iHtf) lui buy. Li>jk mi I'unhcr if y*i rvi|niiL- iir 1 ! 1 
nidPAl illVICk AV41 ¥Sl k\ -■■ *»■■ -11111- 

HnMMl*^fH^Bl-ui UiiJh^r N> a l.i--Kr Ulil J-JJo! Trjiluir- 

li|h? FltlHTIkk II Ilk II I1EMIJ Railing ikirv.t Uii< 

incredibk jflmr *li*- 

tMTZ ASSASLN* GAMES VIU * I.M - Hm Hl..«. StipeirVaiE. 

■■;,„r-„. 

iHTi/n-l-'.l niSXH i SI AKtASE t) - Oipdil- «l-y "■ in *( 

ilylf rf Mm*cj HIwjWt'^* Win. iupfit. 

LJH UESEKT STCRH HVkKFtKm - Uewbd ksduk <rf Ikr 

IUj huur ^thdI ■yiVn-i^c wiih iiihi^ mil all. 

ALMKiEl HlOGCSa- fWusinji miifiiif uul JlikUtl J:il|i 
■ L4Jhiir WllTpfr Ur» H}1?. 

MM tMVCilLC fl-LS LjummiI iiniun cif Ihc F»y'i'li 
ipiMil ^iwl »i* J* **«*, *" Ifiptu «e.. -NOT AS»- 

EWSIABVIEW- Dqpbyi ■llll" <»iHr |i!uk:I> ojfijna 

1-mirllii^.iv. ItiHii any kviiivii an eanttal ■? Iinw. &■"■■ 

1 ^ - iihi--. jikI Sibt *t*ich leiaiK. L*«'fcni piroc of wdtuwt, 

0173 KIPKVt. ■ CiMivcnkm-il ihtcliMj: C6* inrjdf tun*. 

■ASOWONLV- 

Al6l JWaVSTOSTHP HiOKWO - OtW ■* rikonnt jikki. 

*ri> H»y. Sc* humonr. -KBWIKE5 I J MK( iA BfTTtt 

'HlH I <ll)k MI'MJl'K HiJ.hWiy i*ll Klipr. Sijn p<H,H _al 

untnJ vmkn Vct) t .ul WML 

lo I ttOBLPGEfKSHAPHl' - lnlcrrJnui tiimfMErmsi MJu. 
AI&1SAVIHC CERTIFICATE ADVERT - TV Haiittlry and lisoj: 

lu1ikkIim=.oSc TV dd 

(i37ft THk i:bi-'.AI KSI'AP}. llkWLLV BURGLAR - ftro nr» 

irriTimu*. piiii-.Tni H.OTie 

Mi liAMkK Skills MK1 ■ Hum IU CnnnniEiim Kil 
lanwi: MV. 0X0. CAP. 

■M-. I Hk>-.I,.UIK> I tUptm tkW I'll"" Uir- in 

111.I ;:iji ;'ik->^ l!|-- "lit r-- a :;il.jli> h.' •: r.x- I -. -.Iiii-.j.-i I1.11.. 

lnorVBUr Ikpu m> mlur luhjiicil ul CVs^ ^ime cuinnlly nnHirKl 

1 HIPAVTHF m» PAHT X - RotiiMund ihf moms ind 
-.HuKfiKr ihc lahitmuili. but ma lb* fB vMHtm "f- 
<Xtt MltiSlfcS BEl EStiE lidni-wr miiiiiimiii put Bi^i 
uiduACh: pibhibuiijn diyi. Uuy babH. -^i up Kar-^ml nig^Llutit 

■ml ael M-^rw: lEii.lUli^ft CD fHIK^ ^'OUT inltCh& JIKl I'M* IffW 

GJ90 PIAi"lv IlATA'S" - Duigj^^ Miuvkt rigdafHB wnh in 
Al*n BrwJ j..-<nifi" Supxrb p*i*ui=» ""I ln"l> nf ItiiuKS. 
Q2SI S4JPEB PRIX - fi«cihnd ratins bm^ »t.«n^iy in~:ti i»l 
M ujiaiudci - lor iprkt! 

i 11 : nruKASK I.; Bi ci.k run. mm liibk tmmiin iiiiA* 
v.tiu.-h m 1 ir-EsiL-kd neMWiy ilu u deu u end w vnMm 
.Iiii-.i '. .. . ■- .-j. I. :iiii.- >~ ...|i.i:i! .Ii.-r-f ill- .> i-'ir>.'<. il 1 11- - 
BfiUtJ .: Disks- «nn *M) I.FAEN \tlL_l Lusk bmd mny 
bndL fnr inlan- »ilh pitw^-. ci».j re«i km *wl diguMHl tpen'h 
11m iiar>- 01 -Ob Ibntr Lmk ['it-' 

EintTHt: VtlrKII FJICTOil 14(M sptllai !■■» '" ynHtiun. 
U1I3 AGA UniJTlK\ . 1 11.lv « A I SUB atf empKn q; 
Kill AGA. Plim. AOA I .--■ I Urt vd*. Bfc. 35 p«>*i in ill. 



ORDERING PD DISKS 

PRICE PER PD DISK £0.69 

CATALOGUE DISK V0L.1 £0.50 

CATALOGUE DISK VOL.2 ... £0.50 

POSTAGE & PACKING ........ £0,75 

Overseas orders. Use trie above prices., then 
add 2S% o1 that total, to cover (he extra 
postage casts. Thank you, 

I PLEASE MAKE ALLCHEQUES/POSTAL 
ORDERS IN STERLING PAYABLE TO 
RBOLIHn 7FRO SOFTWARE 



SEND ORDERS TO 



GROUND ZEHO SOFTW ARE (CU) 

4 CHANDOS RD 

REDLAND 

BRISTOL BS6 6PE 

ENGLAND 



ALL I 1 :.% ARE COMPATIBLE WITH 
ALL AMIGA'S UNLESS STATED 
-OTHERWISE ' 



EDUCATION 

Lj fiU»i il'AI,H"l'|.ATINB - C'u:uluei dw«innK sad Hmxtdmn 

%unin a 1 nuimc Kcum-? 

E12 Willi ■ tonwniim jrop»*»iB. faluetiiSfMd. Volumt. 

Mass, Tii*. VuKt. Llcnsuy. Aniles. L ialu, ■ 

Eln-CrlE-iiSTliTilHI.. 4 £»«[ pmEJimnnj fn»n Icim-t dt 

$un* to dkiri p«n in *uuik jjuki nf nmny pul 

L2J TOTAL CXIfx'kPTii - am ICOMIMV Undi nf 

Menu ntjltr.mil tuirti W 'vud nilh 

BH TflTAI. <[IStEPTS ■ DO03ADR5 -Whii tjlum ibnui 

pnfn*nii? F**. Oa tat. 

L '2 MOL1C 3D - CiraciMtt .1U reprHemimit erf maircuk*, 

L.pK" IHJI^KKfTr al ilinw- 

K16SIEAM ESGT>E ANIMATI(1\ . Dclu.ltd. Lltelld 

■nuiuiiiiii ul ■ liuuun En|Hr. 

f^T pill IE NTKIJrik PETROL ENfilNE. AWMATlim ■ Man af 

liw^WTK 

B4i CAS TURIINF, AM «*TH IN Hilar miini an.maliim. 
E51 i f il f UK THE ALPHA ftk 1 1 ■ I'u.ulvuue Iddi vn± 

Ihc jdpludKf. i|.Uh dldlUMd ip«vh |nsliui.-liiwr. h^icllclll 

F.-H WW1 HI.H1 1 Jtt¥ BOOK - Mulli-nKU> « ^i-n "=< With Wit 

2 *-i,i^irI IVo mi pienuti. 

E* LITTI F TRA1 KI.IJiR - Uuful afcimrikm a> lie nOoi 

|ni|iulu irj^l ifouriRnKknan In ri-^tu-jl Vi'illl|^. 

L : 4| FRAI'THWi'H - MJlIU IrKhinR HuJ l.cviinr [Eiiursuiinir. 

LJJ THE MATHS ilivkvri kt ■ Mjihv pniblrrft- ptirjnM 

riHL- jn idvcnlun: gun?, 

fjlu.ttlbSI (J flMLSi D«SILTOPGl.linF;T[» t:i.K.CIKIr\H, 

MIfSIC - Mtuivc ^uidc c* oil yuu uanwU lu kncii t&SBI 
■k syilhcMk Vjiiul. ofeliMe ■ ftoind numciei wwj ipwcn- 

BUSINESS S0FT1URRE 

I mtHtlllMVI.SMHIW lliiiiiliiM-.il l.n:l.«il fcurr> 

IW rrcry htiBMI lad p<f&niui ■ic^i'-iiini. bk'. k>*< ipiilkirfiiHi., 

cnmpluB. rtr.. Fik»».-d awn eg Wad pu mm 

1:IM. A liK.llil VI.D - Inpnl iliia ru iniiuu a.riptu, birchmj. 

|ik lIluIa^U:.. UMlUMivd V in |FI' I"!: - 

I »» fOUM UNLIMITED VI.M- Funn JwilfcHKl JulnUng 
i.i.ii I .-I in.iiiuEk m llmluv inenu. 

L M2 L.VT Wll I AMI l»;yl AMEMT »'n« jnurmwn »ill. 
liklnlei purd Ef iicr^T 

L.2K1 J11IKMI. VfcH- Onmiu; y<ur |ifi»«:.il luuii-n, IlkH 
I d^lnkd kwik .IdeiTMflL Lfcy a UH. 

il ('ill ST MAH1T.H VII Hco cnrnplti Ihm li-ni-.il 

nd hav lnlun:i ihsi ^.iiik e hkilIiJ praf^HTWKi *ttch ndcr 

UtoeCUilnlnk'lnr fun-nwH Amipu PnpmMBl ucounLi proarim. 
IJ2«.1 PAT ADVICE, ANALYSER U,n - Hkliail SmtJey* 
lylr*J irlukc ul dknjuy slip dujb4e. 

UKH TEKUiVi;i%H 14.1 . [V bill I'D wad purxwir-'ilK 
iKnjnusl ipell ilrcbtr. SV« II* apjKwta: nimnmim. 

GRAPHICS UTILITIES 

I'l I L.ETHA Ik II <l\ IUSK i.lii.i ili». yiul ..Ml UMB. liVHl 

TnijKTi.'r.piHi p«fok-< from iny IFF pwkir* P-i: r^wirt in 

l=nMp*^ Mmm!« dlreiK*irio1 namplf iivn* -. In;i-.l 

U3 M-CAP'- PW?l»i Dunidini-'HTfAirer Aided |w.j^n pu-lj^. 

UH CHL1GHT - Ei -ninincjuul Rjyii^cr. nDM- iaan;"M? 

LI34i^ 12 LUSKSi VTDEI1 ITII.ITIlL'i ■ 2 peeked disLi lull rf 

iMh iiilrf^ pfojfmmw CDverinf miV Aipciti. id ikt mib^Li 

i < ■ "I 'KhT <;EKRBATOI ■ Fnml bn*rjpr ji-nrialm Hi 

Vhi: bill M-ilhn* (b= hMW fflic iw. 

i. Htj AMIGA F"V ■ Hn.i =i«iy towl dnkmp publiiher. 

L 1 1 j SPECTRA PAlSiT yAJ - tuid AUKIS vmncn IFF pan 

pngnmmK 

1 LIS I.ASI) PI ll.Ll .1.2 AmHhfT lunf * fntml Ib1uj|K 

BciKfilkv, Rrylikikr (nftfem cAku: Mnwuin^. »^kr. I KHdl. rk- 

1 LJ2 FREEPAIFTT- Thi hi H hly it|inJod rt) paini pcLw. Tht 

ii»i bcMjIiciiuiin ifrnocin'l Jirnnl IMuxr Hum 

I .'J ill DID ANIMATION Amnoilivjl iinl Hint frt^iUMlc. 

ITS? MfWlklH - Hpu: mmutmha bm. t virrtii'i pnip^ntis. 

, -H..-I 

L']» GATORS GRAPH"' CA1.1.KRT --lljuiriil *ilh m»} 

n jmpki ul Dew In drrifn ;.-. .Ii i» >ii|ci Vrjis., like in dn- dim». 

(.'3T!i CYCLOK • I'Imu pknn it^ralin «bidl 

L'STI f1)|,YFPVlJt. FV^^anciiailLbsdinimKK^priijrwiuni: 

LI2*.< iMOVIE - VHie lilli**. 

IJ2* lUlJS PAHT - Simtu>. * n>i "J lUmikmil in pulijs Mr 

, i:inii:siciS. 

II2R9 HIS! Ml IEPH V I.U ■ Super fn iimirHiinE piiijianimc. 
The IwjI >t(» lim a a! 

i.klMil'U I'i.iuir lilr .nrii,er3«f.*i tdniransfi.iiTTi nvw 
furaubne. iiKludinfiOlF TTFF, H-1MI- 111 I . AIAH.I II I 

MUSIC TOOLS 

U17B rjOMSOSO -Tndiliwid >iylc.r™ki;<«iip™mgwidk 
Mt*cx *ifl socefi. Vcri guod. IntLydr^ f xpnplr\ 
U 1 88 MFJJI ,1,1 - Mimk isnKnof. \ scad. 

ULH3 I'k' I TRArkkR ■ AlW«h£TprofP«™al muiir v|%perwn 

U200 BHAMW HAMF1.K MAiLER ■ CnK wt*« . wMm i 

HHBd lander haidrwue lU M 

i:2fHI SI-HI ■ iOind SMiplTl fw !■-,' wilh nlkri niaAiw I.ISU. 

l.::rVI ST-n ■ Mine ill He «e. *J ample*. 

I. ii» 2 ST-BI - 4i *fn«. 12 n»|lri 

116} ST-S1 - Ai *.iw. 7S more umcuH. 

LlnA ST-&S - Ai Jtiivi- i^ily 2fl uniplu ihn ume 

I I', INI IN Mill IILHIiHi H ,IUil R 1MP.L1 
I'lltlfUKI:!^ Ill Ml MIIIIUhMi UJ I HftHi 

miBiiHHi i. 1.1 r noi« oi our liTAHIB 

CRTRIOklll BUSKS IDR W I OR M Rl I BN Ohl 
IHMI Hill hUnY HflRI HBJCf IT. 



GAMES 



rj77nACSnCW> Super fail nvirlif id m-av jhhk- I - ■ j . I -- 

■if (Turk*, IiumU iiracLK*. 

OTJBilLUlir^ ■ Vi'ur^uK tmed on in biiiorKil civil »n- 



QUlNSIDBBJi CLl B ■ **vim.rlri auue hkcK tui Lin mm«e 

v niiuiiHUdliun pceind r-xponLmk 

OM PH> MAM LANIt ■ [iiwl 2 plnsTT. CTW-un-mn ai Bi ifcaiti 

duel -il* ■ v«i=iy nf uaipa»irjr. 

(iiii, MECKFIGHT - Rnlr Hkiing [iuTKHrlKfc ynurchirKier i? 

u ioehii on i huge spacf enfr 

rih W ; RCII'MI XKB.O GAMES M - B« uto aunc ..imii|iiIUi.* 

wilh tNnci< like (Hlk-lki. Tmv HavebilL 1 rai ». Fnif I! iBill. 

Gbl EELS ■ (iiKi. ;.jyilr i.nnr Uaccd an ioceminen:iilOrean 

|ame. |ij. r rni. 

U5;. MASTER OF TOWV . AaH-tKM i«me o* prnpeny 

iRWIW-ll'iai ^iiiiib wiiKfc*5. damiir irhkari. hitik ihcei Limpk 

Bulfnn, -ASminNH'. 

G52 BLOCIiTT ■ AiKirci pixi\t June whkh htibeen rkwdfran 

j commeiriij jMne. 

<Mf POM POM GLTHTOR - 5bi«.-=*-up iwtfi *tmied anpbei. 

The HaoMto B Peat HvUur. 

f117K»lAI.AM.'£ , MMeaymnsaMwlimywwaimiid.iiuiltir 

iiiTnaniir Itk-ladcJ animiiecl HULienn;. 

OtH JAB . Clniw nf *i nld ihat iilllli . Ct>Mul Cullrx A, hjl 

litt Pjlcmii mda 3D pltfjuim mm 

i;:r: WKIIIVIS Teuns rame -ilh ■ 1»tJ Inviikti •4udsd 

MIL 

Gli THE GOLDEJ> F1.KKI1-. - Incredible tern id"ennue — - i I h 

mauM of dank. Similw inMHeaH nqBDItl *mnmB urirKum 

icie jilwiikire^. 

OttU 1JAHI2i - Aamhrf nw-^j pune compilw:-^ wilh 21 Buna 

mi ■ IMtB ■i Tllll niiTcrcM tamei»*ie nnei onGW. 

t3]|» ANTEP RPfj -KrJr pli ? iiian~iH? nub u verv iimilir ilyli- 

icil laaBH in rtufer Ulitij euiki 

GUI BlPLANr2S . TUc ui ihe iHie^ in Ihii run ur Hum pinyrt iin 

fipfianiiame. 'A I 3«1 k"SFJ!S, MHAHUH [.TU CACHRSi 

Ci 1 12 111 EL - Phja andl "papfe; 3-lliinni.iuna itpke screisn ume for 

inn jiliyen. Bmh in lankk Mb wnh hir pun Ejaai ibetaxll 

tj]Jl TOTAL rf 41 t:nmpn«nwii«er'k"!nfi|ir HlSk 

Ankcy taml |*ac, 

OlSStPKRLKAlil'K MA>A[iKK Pnotj iiiaKirumml jam, 

(J I. a WORLD - SV-niKif fvliiai ini hIwhiiuu: mi i njinur pfaneL 

■: i I v., I'lutAK, Ljiham-ed rlciK if riinjp-r. ci™. i> m piulcr 

i-nnipi-iiiiM xlc wlKre youenmplev In Eelai mwiy rTnva.ii 

acBCH at ihr wnr BBH 

G14I AMEHCAMl?"Tft*ll COACH - "anaje a Ull lean 

arid call it] lie pfi)> 

41M2 RA'l-rL.EME.NTS ■ Biwdfn Hmvhhu.* fnm r&l. 

OISO r.kCkM] 111 I.IIIIIIAN -Good rcee plqina taa 

fllW HISSKKM K-SHju-cm-^wlui iwHEnM^iiihki. 

OlSt BkaTS RAUL - Oml fcnkina hn JinkuU. JidVp«air iim 

Wuiih. j htn* il ii.41 wuii a lnnJi ctullncB. 

Gfrjl ASHKH] . riiaul ruuilt ame. 

i Y2^>STFM-l i -niir m lie laane pmra uiO Ltan. bawit* 

rKW laruliwi! nn Ihe FTniniil lln™c. Velf BK4tUb3nil. 

[il6H OTHELLO - fSncd hmnH pun. Aim Likiwii aRavaa. 

HIM LHINkH HOSG ■ PlalfiTm aimrlh.1 flr>i naindLktil 

Mum iiluiv ferns ai.o. inll bnlliiat 

i .;'■': HArii K i:AHH 2 -Super I'osi -«L> »«iw c* hmk aaw 

auaaj ■ hcnjl ur BflBa I 

ain crazv sue o - Ptrui* &*<«<*• ■». 

LllinWAJl-CaaHte! [miiDend Sfwrr n»«. 

Glt2 TRKAHI Rk IM.Ah'D Game fcr kid' 

1 .1-' BICili: -V HI AH I ll^hly praiieU [lafnrm tin"- almnii 

Of lWMW ¥ H'i|] ifialiiy. 

Gl*3 HELLZ0NE- 5fK<->Ai-iM-ciii-iipv nrta.Urwi K Type. 

■AI2LNJ USERS. WS ABLE CPU CACHB* 

n l«i I :*jl i ■ Saindi for CREATE ADSTcNTLiRF flAkfFA, nam: 

vi-in .vnii |ni ^ikL-iiiiiir.1 iiiLl! tbneaiy io urf enpinr. 

CiStO FIGHTING HAR RlflKJi -I afj pliya mwial ku hen 

cm up nufcUrjE o-cll aaarted parik* anJ ^i*'- i-il luuici. V.Cjoed. 

fi2Hl A MKiHT AT THE TOP ■ Alrr»I|*lflv l"l iiIkiiIiiie wCj.1i 

i-iuiipi. yuu m 11 ae deep on - 4" iluivi up 

(.in' TOP OT 1 Hk LIACLII . Another nvrer aana a a a au hjiw 

"hiib j-.i,i.uil-. ..:-:,! i;. h- in . -ini .-11 Ibb ad tab ilk" 

and yciL ro dbe lap eif dw? leajvei 

f;?lavO"i7 1.2 [JlSXSilH.tMPlAU - S^cannwanl! wnh Inniiiiiip. 

aaaaBB. 

GSIftfill (2 nSKSiTAI-WMATI - Bla grorae Hinan sane. 

Euzlkeu. -REOLIirtES 2 MBGATtVTF*- 

fl!l2 FBliSI RATION ■ JmrediWrleil hv-'il ■)«■ -■ 

iiii,n |ukinl a& iktpnh and nelail. 

Ml 7 I.THESN - (Haii fiimemii uses «k AiSAchipiei 

-REQUIRES i ME0 ARVTES, A1IU1I ONLY ■ 

[UJ I HOW ■ ARROW - Anhcrt jane. 

CLV24 UBUVKIN - Super fill ilrfmlrr i-tnc 

□334 M1IRIA ill - Uia RPG nWgTjnnydwikTimi luaielaM, wilh 

Iniilndn FiEii Ini y hiiin y-ou caa eiyilofc and I'iril Ihe du;pi 

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Programming 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



Blitz Basic 2 

£69.95 - Acid Software - 
071 482 4066 



File: Starf iMd.bbZ 

i M* Parallax Starfield Ef 
i ttf By Jason Holborn 



0,44,320 
0,320, 



Hot on the heels of AMOS comes Blitz Basic 2, a new 
kid on ihe block that offers features similar to AMOS 
but with the promise of faster code execution speeds 
and a compiler built in as standard. Designed and writ- 
ten by New Zealand software team Acid Software, 
Bliti Basic 2 also supports the Amiga's new AG A chip 
set, making ii the first Amiga programming language 
that allows you to take full advantage of the extended 
colour palette and screen modes ottered on A1200 
and A40OD Amigas, 

Blitz' command set is certainly impressive Not only 
does it deliver the AMOS-like ability to directly access 
(he Amiga's custom hardware, but Blitz also fully sup- 
ports the Amiga's 'Intuition' windowing environment, 
the foundations of Workbench, As a result, you can 
not only write programs lhal can rnaka use of super- 
smooth scrolling, high speed sprites and bobs and 
interrupt-driven music, but you can also open screens 
and windows on the Amiga's Workbench complete 
with a full array of different gadget types and pull down 
menus. This is perhaps the main area where Blitz 
scores over AMOS - unless Eu repress released their 
promised Intuition language extension, Blitz will con- 
tinue to hold this ace card. 

Another big advantage Blitz has over AMOS is the 
fact that it comes as standard wilh a full-blown compiler that transforms your 
Blilf creations into true machine code programs. The resulting 'object' liles run 
at break- neck speeds (faster even than "CM). Blitz is an impressive BASIC lan- 
guage that ryns rings around most of the competition, Does it 
beat AMOS, however? You'll have to read Ihe box elsewhere on 
this page to find oul! 



planes = 5 : nuM 
x(nim),y(n 

a = n 
x(a)=320 
yCa)= C 



a-0 n 

x(a), 

x(a)=xCa)- 

x(a)C0 

xCa)=320- 

y(a> ( 

zCa)* C 



ITZ 88SK 2 COMPILER OPTIONS 



Create Icons for Executable Files; 

Runtine Error Debugger... 

Hake SnalLest Code: 

Create Debug Info for Executable Files: 






Object Buffer; 24576 
Systwt Buffer: 6144 
Macro Buffer: 8192 



Object Hax ittUHS 

Banks 
flnln - 



Libs Buffer: 



Data Buffer: 



String Buffer: 



Resident 



6144 



18240 



>lanes)+i 



The 9rr,ii(n.t challenge lo AMOS' supremacy hax t$m* Irom Aitid Software' a Blilz Basic 2, an 
amaiingly 1**1 l*ngw*ge geared heavily towards game* programming, 



GFA Basic 3.5 

£49.95 - GFA Data Media (UK) Ltd - 0734 794941 

GFA Daia M&dia's Basic interpreter system is another one of the old guard that have been floating around for 
more years than most of us can remember, Originally launched to critical acclaim on Ihe Atari ST, GFA Basic 
was ported across to the Amiga and larted up considerably. Although the original Amiga release of GFA 
Basic was shakey to say the least (it would crash every five minutes or so), GFA quickly ironed out the bugs 
and GFA Basic i$ now one of the most stable operating-system -friendly BASIC languages available for the 
Amiga, 

The latest version of GFA Basic, version 3.5, offers a powerful instruction set that includes all the con- 
structs that you'd expect from a decent structured programming language plus a few I ricks of its own 
including powerful matrix transformation commands (ideal for working with 3D graphics}. Although the basic 
GFA system does not include a compiler, GFA also sell a compiler for an extra £29,95 that allows you to pro- 
duce programs that run independently of the interpreter. This obviously adds to the price making GFA 
somewhat pricey when com- 



pared to more modern rivals 
such as Blitz Basic. 

GFA Basic certainly isn'l 
ideal for games programming, 
but for programming applica- 
tions its still a worthy 
contender. Due lo its age, both 
the interpreter and compiler 
can be picked up for peanuts 
these days so it may still be 
worth considering if you're not 
interested in writing high speed 
arcade games, £99*%, 



GFA Bosk may hats since been aur- 
passtd by the Men or Blilz Basic and 
AMOS . but it still provides a good 
nablc devikpmBrrt system tor writ- 
ing application* nnrl 'serious' 
programs, 



•GFfl-iWC HTFoF 
ji Savt ISavfjAt Aril 
«*\ Lc ai IHtriw II list 



I Httf ■ IBLkSt j IRevlaci 
IBlsek: ISUiEnd I Find " 



Pff Wtoi-natl. 
■"EMftM 



ipfcrl Run 33: 37: IB 

"kun I Tfst a 



The palette is it so ci'titeS by thai proi 

Tint t?m i icrsen (specify m*m with 32 tulors* wb * windfiM 



OPENS l.lv&.JJUM.S,! 

i 

' Load the piltttf mil sft the co|«rj properly 
ftPEN ■iMirjmiMICiilnn.ii.l" 
FOR v*:9 TO FHEDtLOFdlVZ) 
SEICOL0R vft, CVH IMPUTE 2 Jl» 

ml a 

CWSE It 

' liil 3, b»b: (sreei iiasicioin) 

5S;IMPUTi<L4f(ll).ll) 

ntbtis%,2i'A)^miiii) * overlay 
object, Shape j,s$ 
aosr u 

OPEN "i".ll -uTABMIClewthw.iA* 

HI1DS( 55. ££. 1>=CHR*C1*> 
IBJECJ.&JWE 4 4 sS 

ILOSE II 



Amos Vs Blitz 

Much has been written extolling lite virtues at Acid's 
n m Blil; Has it Z , but ils arrlvat has only mad a the 
process of choosing an Amiga BASIC prapramm-nB 
language that hit simpler. For users wishing to writs 
last arcade games. GFA Basic and HiSofl BASIC ate 
del inately out of the ran ning which I eaves you to 
choose between Blilz and AM [IS Professional, a 
choice which is certainly funiculi la make. 

Both Blitz and AMOS allow direct access to Ihe 
Amiga's custom video and sound hardware, but Blitz 
has the added advantage of also Fully supporting 
both Intuition and the new AC A chip set. Euro press 
originally claimed that an AGA language extension 
would be released lor AMOS, but recent events have 
made the chances of llrrs appearing somewhat 
remote. Add In this the lacl that Blitz also comes as 
standard with a compiler (AMOS prog rammers need 
to pay an axlra £35 lor ih is ! i a nd it seems cl ear lhal 
Hit! Is Ihe winner. Oris it' 

It's certainly true lhal Blilz is potentially mate 
powerful than AMOS, hut both have the if strengths 
and weaknesses. As anyone who has attempted lo 
program in Blitz will tell you, it's nol a language for 
Ihe faint-hearted. Even it you read through the manu- 
als Irom cover lo cover, Blitz still requires a lair 
knowledge nl programming concepts and the 
Amiga's hardware to get me best Irom 11. AMOS, on 
the other hand, is a far more access in I e language 
that can be learnt fairly easily. What's more, lite hril- 
lianl AMOS manuals make this process even easier. 
AMOS code may not run quite as last, but program it 
correctly and there's very little Itial Bill? can do thai 
AMOS can't. 

At Ihe end of the day. the decision is down lo 
you. II you rale yours ell as an experienced coder and 
you enjoy la ck ling difficult concepts, then Blilz is for 
you. For we mear mortals, however, AMOS is still ihe 
choice. 






63 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Programming 



LATTICE/SAS C 6.3 

£279 - HiSoft Ltd - 0525 718181 



» 



ullici Skrirrt UI14T 

}■■»— 

i*.< MrftfPWl 111 



ir*ttti 

M pri. 




" iMaausraiBRMtr "" 



Siiriil HiffVlh. 



i'i'. 



IX J. L-hHUIU. 



In i market virtually devoid of compctiiion, Lallice 
::iiniinu« lo update their successful C cortipiler. This 
laleat release is th* i»m( pnwerlul val. 



If you're writing applications soft- 
ware, then 'C is considered ihe 
choice language lor accessing 
the Amiga's operating system 
routines. Mosl of the operating 
syslem is written in C itself, so 
it's not hard to see (pardon the 
pun) why C compilers have 
become so popuiar, Surprisingly, 
however, very few commercial 
"C compilers are actually avail- 
able - Ihe only two that are still 
available is Lattice's excellent 
offering (reviewed here) and 
Aztec C, a compiler system thai 
never quile made il across the 
pond from ttS home in the United States. 

The price of Lattice C may seem rather steep, but when you receive the 
package it's easy to see where all the money has gone. Bundled with the pro- 
gram are two massive manuals that cover just about everything you could 
possibly wish to know about Lattice C, The compiler system itself is pretty 
complete two - eveylhing you need to edit, compile and debug your C pro- 
grams is there. Lattice include their own 1SE' screen editor which attempts to 
make the compilation process as integrated as possible. You can edit your 
source code and then compile it to memory or disk without having lo leave 
LSE. Debugging is particularly well handled too thanks lo 'CodeProbe", a sym- 
bolic debugger that allows you to step through your code one instruction at a 
time. 

Lattice C 6.0 is rather pricey when you consider that mere are PD C com- 
pilers available, bul - as the old motto goes -you get what you pay for. It's 
undoubtedly l he most complete and most professional C com- ^y^ 
piler system available for the Amiga. Highly recommended, f^^p 



HiSpeed Pascal 

£99.95 - HiSoft Ltd - 0525 718181 

HiSoft have a reputation for producing market-leading programming language 
compilers and HiSpeed Pascal is certainly no exception. Then again, becom- 
ing the market leader was hardly a diflicutt task ■ apart from Metacomco's 
rather geriatric 'MCC Pascal' package, HiSpeed Pascal is the only Pascal 
compiler available for She Amiga. That's nol to say that HiSpeed Pascal isn't 
any good, however. Far Irom it Offering full compatibility with TurboPascal 5.0 
on Ihe PC, HiSpeed Pascal is a force to be reckoned with. 

Like HiSoft's other programming languages, HiSpeed Pascal is based 
around an integrated programming environment that allows you to edit, com- 
pile and debug your Pascal programs from within a single program. The editor 
is a sophisticated multi- window affair that allows you to edit more than one 
source file at any one time. What's more, you don't have to enter all your pro- 
gram code in one go -just like TurboPascal 5,0 on the PC, you can write code 
in a 'modular' form so lhal each module is compiled separately and the pack- 
age's linker simply pieces them all together. This allows you to concentrate on 
individual routines without getting bogged down in code. 

Pascal is hardly the number one choice tor most Amiga users and HiSoft 
make no attempt to leach the 
language in its weli-wnlten users 
manual. If you're new to Pascal, 
however, then there are plenly of 
books available on Ihe subject so 
learning to program in Pascal 
shouldn'l be too painful. Whether 
you're a professional Pascal pro- 
grammer or just getting started. 
HiSpeed Pascal is an excellent 
programming language ^—^ 
that deserves to do f^tgjj) 



till inji 




well. 

Pascal mVf no1 be everyone's cup of tea 

birt HISdII have certainly clone a damned 

good job of bringing it m the Am ig a! 



frnlirtTB' )v 

Hill :■ HtrfMLtpM-: u.nd 

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iw I 



DEVPAC 3 

£69.95 -HiSoft -0525 718181 



Ask any professional Amiga programmer what the best 
Amiga assembler is and chances are that they'll; say 
Davpac. During the many years that Devpac has been 
available, HiSoft have enhanced it immeasurably and the 
Ifatnst release, Devpac version 3, is even better, Even in 
these days of PC-based PDS and Snasms that allow you 
to assemble your code down a cable directly inlo the host 
machine, Devpac 3 still has a rormiddable following in 
professional programming circles. Top programmers like 
DMA Design's Dave Jones (the author of Lemmings) and 
Jez San (StarGlidef, etc) still swear by Devpac. 

Jusl like HiSoft's other great programming language, 
HiSpeed Pascal, Devpac is based around a fully inte- 
grated programming environment thai allows you to- edit 
your assembly programs, assemble them both lo memory 
and to disk and debug them without leaving the comfort of 
HiSoft's well-designed Devpac front end. The assembler 
itself is a beast ol a program lhat is possibly the fastest 
assembler available on the markel (yea, it's even taster 
than ArgAsm!). It can produce code that is fully compati- 
ble with Ihe full range of Motorola processors and you can 
even optimise your code for Ihe 68040. 

HiSoft's powerful MonAm debugger is an absolute joy 
to use. Just like ihe version of MonAm bundled with 
HiSpeed Pascal, MonAm supports full source code level 
debugging and you can cany out a full range ol opera- 
tions including setting break-points, view and modify both 
memory and Ihe processor's own registers and a whole 
lot more besides. In all, Devpac 3 si ill 
remains the Amiga's number one assembler. I 



IDT 



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petition, HiSoh b Devpac 3 
ahll remains Ihe nu imbar on* 
Amiga assnmhlrr. 




it m* f| r nw nFfn thT wkrrdOV (*|-«*uU ir.do 



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» thv «*r 1*4 



Bundled witti both HiSpeed 

Pascal and HiSott Devpac 3 a 

Man Am. a powerful symbolic 

drtiugger. 



** Xfti! i*,ttn*<Pf y,*i 




6# Tj l jlj l J jjWpi l WW M*W» H 

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bi- jja I t_C IjuPi-l-ln.. 

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IrA Ul if II Hlfl F* } 1 111 

LML LLXLC. U#«iiL. ■tr*i-kv 

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b«' H'l L lr.%-J I I If Ftll 

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64 



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g-lndMi 

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£ry?H 

ihita Cl 
l*f 5(1-1 

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Idea, 



Why is this women looking so scared? 
Perhaps it's because she's just caught a 
glimpse of the latest frighteningly 

good issue of the world's best 
Amiga magazine - CU Amiga! 
This 280-page beast comes 
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video offer and a special 
32-page Hot Games sup- 
plement featuring 
exclusive reviews of 
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\ 



k 




^L£CL£te L Lil£Ll L 



AMIGA 

SUE ON SALE 

i MISS I" 



u 



1l 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



Programming 



ARGASM 



£59.95 - Argonaut Software - 081 200 5777 



» 



g Hrgflsn Detto - vl .S' 


1 - S 1989 flrgtnaut Software Ltd, 


1 




3 rhswtble Preferences 




Object cade type 
Case dependant? 
Debug Lnf omation 




Independent 




Hone Exports 




] Lift to 

Output to 
Error options 
List options 

Hixinun object sue 
Header filenane 
INCUR path Hit 
Assenble options 


Strwn Printer Disk 


Nmc 




Warnings Retype tine Optima 




Macros Harrow list in, 




.- . 








65536 ffacro definition size 1 £384 


■ptlfllSl 


Statistics 


Cancel flsswible 




5 1 


39 





Jez San isn t |ust a damned fine games prog rammer - he kn<i*s how to wrlle a pretty decern 
Amiga assembler toe! 

Also worth a mention is Argonaut Software's ArgAsm, a combined 
editor/assembler combination written by Jea San, possibly one of the best 
known Amiga games programmers. Originally designed as an in-house tool lor 
use by Argonaut's own team of games programmers, ArgAsm' s main claim lo 
fame is its impressive assembly speeds. Although Devpac 3 has now caught 
up, ArgAsm is still laster in some situations, 

There are a number of problems with ArgAsm, however, not least of which 
is the (act that Argonaut rto longer support the product. Due to its hardware- 
lewel games programming orientated design, ArgAsm doesn't include a 
debugger such as the Men Am loot bundled with Devpac, As Jez San rightly 
points out, games software usually kicks out the operating system and so pro- 
grams N^e MonAm will not run. For the rest of us, however, this is one 
omission that severely limits ArgAsm's usefulness. Another major problem 
with ArgAsm is its reliability - crashes are a regular (and annoying) oceu ranee. 
Unless Argonaut Sort out these problems (which is unlikely), ^ml 
ArgAsm is just loo limited to be useful. t^^^^J 



MACR068 



£130 - Helios Software - 0623 554828 

A brand new arrival on the assembler scene is Helios Software's Macro68, an 
Amiga assembler that supports the full range of Motorola processors. Written 
by DigiSoft, Macro68 claims to be the fastest Amiga assembler bar none. In 
tests this proves not to be entirely true however - Argonaut's ArgAsm and (in 
certain circumstances) Hi Soft's Devpac 3 slill hold that crown. The reason for 
Macro68's impressive fum of speed can be credited lo the fact thai it is what is 
known as a 'single pass assembler'. Trial is, it scans and assembles source 
files in one go rather than the 'two pass" approach adopted by most other 
Amiga assemblers. 

Macro&B certanly isn't a jack of ail trades like Devpac. however. Even 
DigiSoft freely admit thai in order lo gel Macro&S lo do anything even remotely 
interesting you'll need to get your hands on a text editor (Workbench's 'Ed' will 
do the job, albiet slowly) and - more importantly - a debugger. This makes 
MacrofiB seem rather expensive when compared lo the likes of both ArgAsm 
and Devpac. In its favour, however, is the fact that MaeroSB can be conl rolled 
entirely via AFte** which essentially means that you could control the assem- 
bler completely from within a text editor like CygnusSoft's Cygnus Ed 2. 

Macro&B is a powerful assembler that gets the job done but at the end of 
ihe day it's ihe price that is the deciding factor. Devpac 3 is considerably 
cheaper and you aiso get the added benefit of an integrated text 
editor/assembler/debugger all in one package. 



Include files 

The Amiga's operating system has received more titan its lair share of Hack over Ilia years 
but there's rto escaping Ihe lad that - from a programmer's point qI view at least - il's very 
powerful indeed, The designers of Ihe OS were a clever lot -all Ihe code renjuirerf io per- 
form ju-sl about any operating system level task (opening a window, accessing Ihe sound 
chips, creating 'child' processes etc] have been collected together into what the iechies 
call 'libraries', Many ol these libraries are built into ihe Amiga's ROM whereas others are 
loaded from Ihe LIBS:' directory on your Worth ench disk. They contain whole col lections 
ol individual routines lhat give Ihe programmer direct access to the operating systems 
many resources. 

in order to access these routines, however, you must have Commodore's 'Include' 
fi I es . These inclu de 1 i le s cd nta in hundreds of del in I tl ons 111 at tell your program h aw la 
access the routines buried within lire Amiga's ROM, Virtually all commercial programming 
languages come complete with the neccessary include tiles for thai particular language 
but beware when buying PD languages - because they include flies are Ihe copyrighted 
property of Commodore, you have to pay lor these separately. They cost just £25 and are 
available direct from Commodore. 






Other languages 

11 you want to be a oil dillerenl Irom your friends then you don't have to go tor established' 
programming languages like C, Pascal and Assembler. Here's a quick round-up ol uiher 
more unusual Languages on oiler. 

Amiga Logo 

£49.95 Commodore UK Ltd 

Lap was invented as a language lor use within schools lor teaching school children the 
fundamentals ol computer programming. Commodore's Logo language was written to help 
the Amiga break into this lucrative market. It fully supports ihe lull Lop Instruction set 
including those infamous 'turtle' graphics. 

Helios Forth 

£120 Helios Software 

Forth may not be the choice lor most Amiga programmers, hut Helios have done a fine Job 
ol bringing litis unusual language to Ihe Amiga. Helios Forth is a powerful integrated Forth 
programming system Dial includes everything yog need to write Forth programs. Although 
It does directly support Commodore's own Include files, Helios include a subset thai gives 
you access lo Ihe more common routines In rough its own libraries. Definitely nol a lan- 
guage for the kg inner, however, 

The Director 2.0 
£99.99 Silica Systems 

Mot quite a full-blown programming language, the Director Is aimed mora at Ihe viden 
market. Il's a powerful scripting language that allows you lo write programs with a defi- 
nite graphic bias. The Director lully supports sialic IFF files, animations. in it sound 
samples. Originally used by Amiga animation guru Erie Shwarti, The Director Is still worth 
investigating. 




Helto-a Software ate rapidly becoming a ma(flr lore* in !h* Amiga programming language* 
market, No! cotUbuI with ratuilng (wo 1aol» lor assembler p*ogf ammsra, Iney were also 
reapaniiblc lot bringing trie forth language la Ihe Amiga, 



60 






Programming 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



AMOS PRO COMPILER 

£34.95 Europress Software 

If you own any one of the three different vera ions of AMOS {Easy 
AMOS ; AMOS 'Classic' or even AMOS Professional} then you need 
the AMOS Professional Compiler, Although its name would suggest 
that it is aimed at AMOS Pro owners, IJi© AMOS Pro Compiler will 
happily compile programs written in any of these Ihree programming 
systems. The compiler does come into its own, however, when used 
with AMOS Pro. Not only can yg-u compile code from within the 
AMOS Pro Editor but you can even run it loo - truly an integrated 
programming environment, 

Although the speed increase in your code will depend entirely 
upon the type of program you've written, virtually all AMOS pro- 
grams benefit from being compiled. If you've written a program that 
performs a lot of heavy calculations, the compiler will turbo-charge it 
beyond belief. A must for all AMOS programmers. 



tinr-1 I I 


1 >! /mnAm\m®\jA&^. laical 


Cai 








I y&u own AMOS then you have to buy the AMOS Pn 
any AMOS pro-gram into super-last machine coder 



p-iler. It'll turn 



Other Programming tools 

ReSOURCE 

£130 Helios Software 

If you've written a program in assembler and you just happen to lose your source 
code there's usually no way of converting your assembled code back to source 
code, That is, unless you happen to own Helios Software's 'ReSOURCE', a powerful 
disassembler thai converts assembled code into source code. ReSOURCE is pretty 
intelligent too - if your program makes use of the routines built into the Amiga's 
ROM. it wili automatically convert those unfriendly library offset values into Ihe 
appropnate library routine name. If, for example, your program opened a library 
using the Exec routine 'OpenLibrary'. instead of seeing a value of $228 displayed 
within your source code, ReSOURCE would substitute il for _LVOOpen Library. 
Although rather pricey, ReSOURCE is a must for all serious Amiga assembly lan- 
guage programmers, 

Craft 

£24.95 Black Legend Software 

One of the most powerful features of AMOS is the way its instruction set can easily 
be extended using what are known as language 'extensions'. The latest language 
extension to be launched is Craft (short for Colour, Requesters, Audio, Fractals and 
Text), Craft adds over 160 new commands to AMOS that give the AMOS program- 
mer the ability to generate fractal graphics with just a single command. Craft also 
gives the programmer a number of handy requesters such as a file and colour 
requester, all of which can be used within your own programs with ease, The full 
range of funclions available are loo numerous lo mention - suffice to say that it's just 
the sort of thing all AMOS owners should buy. 

Turbo 1 .9 

EFREE! Public Domain 

It's unusual lo find an AMOS extension that can be bought for Ihe price of a disk but 
this is exactly what we have in the form of Turbo, The latest release delivers a whole 
range of new commands that either extend AMOS or provide meaner and leaner 
versions of existing AMOS commands. Amongst Turbo's replacement commands 
are a whole host of new bob and icon handling instructions that can draw bobs onto 
the screen three times faster than even compiled AMOS prog rams. Turbo also offers 
a handy 'Stars' command that creates parallax starlields with up to 256 stars using 
'virtual' hardware sprites. A definite must for all AMOS programmers. 



Features table 














Product 


Supplier 


Price 


Language 


Compiler ( 


DS Support 


Hardware Support 


AGA 


Debugger 


Hi Soft Basic 


HiSoft 


£49,95 


BASIC 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


gfa Basic 


GFA Data Media 


£49.95 


BASIC 


Optional 


Yes 


No 


NO 


No 


AMOS Professional Europress 


£49.95 


BASIC 


Optional 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Blitz Basic 


Acid Software 


£69-95 


BASIC 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Lattice C 6,0 


HiSoft 


£279 


C 


Yss 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


His peed Pascal 


HiSoft 


£99 95 


Pascal 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Devpac 3.0 


HiSoft 


£69.95 


Assembly 


Assembler 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


ArgAsm 


Argonaut 


£59.95 


Assembly 


Assembler 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Macro68 


Helios 


C130 


Assembly 


Assembler 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Helios Forth 


Helios 


£120 


Forth 


Yes 


Psuedo 


No 


No 


NO 


Amiga Logo 


Commodore UK 


£49,95 


Logo 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


The Director 2.0 


Silica 


£99.99 


Custom 


Yes 


No 


NO 


No 


No 



67 



39/40 QUEENS CHAMBERS, QUEENS STREET, PENZANCE, CORNWALI 









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OFTWARE DEMON Ltd-would like to wish all our customer 
present and future all the best at Christmas. To celebrate the sea 
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ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ESOE ALL TRADEMARKS. ACKNOWLEDGED 




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39/40 QUEENS CHAMBERS, QUEENS STREET, PENZANCE, CORNWALL, TRI8 4MB 



COMPUTERS 

AMIGA 1=1400/040 

The Flagship of the Commodore 
fimigo range. Seised around the 
68040 processor. Comes with Hard 
Drive, 2 + 4 RAMcnd WR3. 



85Mb version 
120Mb version 
170Mb version 
250Mb version 
340Mb version 
426 Mb version 



£1899 
£1910 
£1930 
£1970 
£2069 
£2149 



AMIGA A4000/030 

The some specifications as it's big 
brother but designed around the 
€C68030 processor. Comes with a 
Hard Drive, 1 + 1 RRM and WR3. 
(FOR 2+2 ADD £69) 

85Mb version £899 



120Mb version 
170Mb version 
220Mb version 
256Mb version 
340Mb version 
426 Mb version 



£899 
£969 
£990 
£1015 
£1030 
£1000 
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68040 CPU, MMU, 

40MHz FPU, 040 PAN€L 

PHOTON £699 

50MHz CLOCK SP€€D, 
50MHz FPU, MMU 
H€LLFIRG £299 

MATHS CO-PRO (PLCC) 

33MHz 68882 (UJIXH CRVSTflL) £99 
40MHz GB882 £129 

MEM08V 

single sided SIMMS modulo For R4000 
1Mb RRM £39 

4Mb RF1M £149 

CCELERATORS 

clerotors ore produced for the 
bu GVP, o watch ujord in quality 
ond reliability, Goth boards ore user 
fft table via the trapdoor so os to 
maintain your warranty. 

GVP SCSI/RAM BOARD 

This board hos slots For up to 8Mb of 
Rom, o moths co-pro (FPU) and has and 
includes on SCSI interface as standard. 

OMb.'NOFPU £170 

4Mb/33MHz FPU 

SCSI CRI3L€ KIT £44 

GVP A 1230 BOARD 

This board features a 68030 processor 

as standard and olso has slots for up to 
6Mb of ROM and a maths co-pro. 

0Mb, NO FPU 
4Mb/4CMHz FPU 

VP ACC6SSORI€S 

MHz 68882 FF 
40MHz 68882 FPU 

■Mt»r- 




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GRAPHICS 

REAL 3D 2 £378.50 

RRTDePTHPRO £134.99 

MORPHPLUS £136.99 

DPfiiNT HOH £66.00 

DPRINT IV £59.99 
S«N€RY ANIMATOR 4 £54.99 

VISTAPfiO 3 £44.99 

MAK€ PATH £23.99 

TCRAAFORM £23.99 

SCALRMM210 £ POA 

SCALA MM100 £ POA 



UTIUTI€S 




X-COPV PRO 


£31 ,99 


Gfl ROUTE PLUS 


£32.99 


LATTICeCvd.l 


£259.00 


DIR€CTORY OPUS 


£46.50 


VIDCO BACKUP 


£49.95 


QUATERBflCK 


£47.50 


D€V PACK 3 


£53.99 


VIDI AMIGA 12 


£81.95 


DISTANT SUNS v4.2 


£39.99 


MUSIC 




ST€RGO MASTER 


£29.99 


BARS & PIPES PRO 


£215.99 


TGCHNOSOUND 2 


£58.50 


UJP & DTP 




UJOflDUJORTH 2 


£78.99 


FINAL COPV 2 


£74.99 


P6N PAL 


£28.95 


PAG€S€TTGfi 3 


£43.99 


PRO DRAW v3.0 


£64.99 


PRO PAG6 v4.0 


£89.99 



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"ECHNICAL SUPPORT AND FAX (0726) 33 1499 

PLEASE MAKE CHEQUES AND P.O PAYABLE TO "SOFTWARE DEMON Ltd" 
PLEASE QUOTE YOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER AND EXPIRY DATE 

ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WnTHOUT NOTICE. EAOE. ALL TRADEMARKS ACKNOWL 






AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 BuSJUBSS 



THE AMIGA IN BUSINESS 

The Amiga might be seen as nothing more than a toy by these who don't know any better, but the truth of the 
matter is that it has a great selection of software to help you run a business, too. 
Of course, you probably already use word processors and databases at home, but there's also plenty of pack- 
ages which will really improve your business performance, handling everything from stock control and 
invoicing to mail outs and electronic communication. 

WORD PROCESSORS 

WORDWORTH 2 AGA 



£129.99- DIGITA- 0395 270273 

It seems lhat the traditional definition of a word processor has been all but for- 
gotten, Wordworth is one of the first of the new breed. 

Times were when a word processor was simply a piece of software for edit- 
ing text, and printing it in a quick and lidy fashion Most packages had some 
sort of dictionary to check the spelling of your documents, and if you were 
really lucky, you might even find a Thesaurus to help you keep your writing 
creative. 

Wordworth i» one of 1h» flrjl Ami jft wort) pr-oeesaoira tc oW« grapnk-s support 




m 

ehi 



WULLim Wordsworth wis bam on the 7th April 1770 at GsckMrtWuth Ln C umteff Idfl i\ 
England. He grew up in the beautiful late district thatuws later to provide inspiration 
for much of his psetty an j 
marred by the tragedy ".tw i 
Wheft he >MS lu*t rl£ht y f 
hi) f*th*r flw years later, i 




Thanks to 
Wordworth, those 
things are taken 
completely for 
granted, and the 
package includes 



J 



J 






ni|> 







U.lkJ 



1L-H rm.il 



i C.il 



_j Curt j h* *l 
HiMt FHikr 






F? Fa 



II is BXlfemoly c-r*:;y 3d r: nrf igu rn ch«- prog'iim to run with virtually arvy 
printer and this makes If a good choice tor beginners. 



such features as scalable fonts, graphics support, drawing tools and support 
tor any built-in typefaces your printer may have. 

In fact, it's ability to configure itself exactly to whatever printer you own with 
a minimum ot effort on your behalf is Wordworth' s greatest strength. By simply 
following a few on-screen prompts, the program is ready to use with no eom- 
plicaled printer preferences to be se! up. 

Mot only does il let you use your printer's fonts, but if you're not oulputting 
to a postscript device you can also use scalable Compu graphic fonts such as 
those used by Workbench 2.0 machines, 

This means that you have access to literally thousands of different 
typefaces, all of which will print at the vary maximum qualify your printer 
is capable of. 

It can import bit- mapped and Encapsulated Postscript graphics, although 
the latter cannot be viewed on the screen. 

The program comes with tons of clip art so that you can give your docu- 
ments more punch, and it's also supplied wilh 17 fonts. 

CONCLUSION 

Wordworth is one of ttiose programs lhat you tend to love or hate, It comes with 
more options lhan you can wave a stick at, and its extremely unlikely that you're 
ever going to use many of them. Its lont and graphics printing ssem a little 
quirky, but program's of this complexity inevitably take lime to learn, it can 
import and export text from many other word processors including Word Perfect. 
A very solid program. Check the price with Digits before you buy because they 
have been known to sell the program for a substantial discount. 

Requires Kickstart 1.3, 1.5 megs of RAM and a hard drive or 
two floppies. 



FINAL COPY 2 

£79.95 - SOFTWOOD EUROPE • 0773 836781 



Ttiivjv; 



j^np^j. ii =i=i_i tT. t uitL.i?.^-.r ri.^,v.;rii Q ;-i °i 



"pc\^ &\cyc/& 



\yf AJIen -ktl'mr 

Fo' 71h grccre English Qan*£D3t*kni 
leughf by Ilk*. Krerlsy 



final Copy affera by lar 
the moat flexible fonts. 

handling, but it'll takg a 

whits lo csipltnc the- lull 

pQlqnlinl of variable 

ablkquelnglar creating 

dynamic looking pages. 




Wordworth and Final Copy are arch rivals, however with release 2, Final Copy 
gives users a clear choice of options when deciding which package to buy. 

The publishers of both programs have recognised the importance of high 
quality text priming, but whilst Wordworth uses bit-mapped screen fonts, and 
even supports (hem for printing, FC2 exclusively uses scalable fonts bolh on- 
screen and when printing. However, lo compensate for the slight lack of 
flexibility. Final Copy supports Postscripl fonts, and will even download new 
ones to your postscript printer in needed. 

In fact its font handling is more flexible than Wordworth although 
Softwood's insistence on taking the typographically correct, but inconvenient 
route, to typefaces means that you must load a separate typeface if you want 
an italic version of |he Nimbus Q or SoftfaceS included with the program. 
Wordworth simply performs the necessary operation wilti no effort by the user. 
Yet again, Final Copy does offer an additional feature in the form of its vari- 
able obliqueing command 
which slants your text by a 
user-definable amount. 

If you're working with 
small text or graphics, the 
program's variable magnify 
feature is also handy. 

Although the program 
doesn't come with the 
friendly printer configura- 
tion program that 
Wordworth boasts, surpris- 
ingly it is actually more flexible when it comes to output. For starters, reseated 
graphics are still printed at the best possible quality, whereas Wordworth 
unfortunately degrades images that are shrunk, and increases the jaggies if 
they're enlarged. Also, strangely enough. Wordworth only prints as many 
colours as the current the current screen mode permits, whereas Final Copy 
will use the full palette of the graphic image, simply using the screen image as 
a representation. 

CONCLUSION 

Final Copy 2 seems to conform much more closely lo the Amiga design proto- 
cols, and this gives it a very polished appearance. It's a pily that it can't import 
and export text from other word processors as this is important to professional 
users, but for home use I suppose ASCII import and export is adequate. The 
print quality is excellent and at the price Final Copy 2 represents reasonable 
value. If you need lots of text editing and formatting options, then this is a 
good starting place, but if they're not so important as powerful graphics han- 
dling and page design tools, then take a good look at P&ges&tter 3. 

Requires Kickstart 1.3, 1 meg of RAM and a hard drive or 
two floppies. 







I.fuii iMilat a, uri Hal'il 
Lta.,.1*. V m, K-..I.... - 



• \vjrm i|» 'vmiiin 4h*-iM 
n t iwrtriiii rhi-|-n*r7 friti n 1 

n "ti bcyrt* pa ka i«id Than 
ikiib 1hrri Kill -■ tJIcui bKydM tntt^ 
S^I-bl niJ'i' ELtqn llvBD-airom 

Men* tvn.-d» In" urki ajjf-pmi 
rat* n, rr*t tv.tr.. mi T..vi*.*r. 



_- 




H"s afway* handy to be nblc ia cull up instant si.niisltc* about 
your dtnrumtnl. ant* all the programs here Offer a s imilar feature. 




70 



USineSS AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



FINAL WRITER 

£129.99 - SOFTWOOD EUROPE - 0773 836781 



rir>t«r - H*-lr 




U fciil j*J _i*. zslI irJEii'_aJ *l«rl c I 3 ?»1 



lL#H»JgiLJNm-l[-H-/|-HniTH.J3 J3I ■=! 



. ,,.... "I 



T'Taarw ii cj| .vti i-ify romnio" luetic ust "■- 
twTjiehme nsino tolheooniut'c dcJcJjcne- 'It's a 
pmblram wilh ti-ie power aiwttch lie soys " afc dgfnl 
nmny, end berjna to open the bcclcof 'tis monda 

'We wcxildn'1 lecilly i ecomiue-ij people la stait 
messing abaJ injuie Ihsii mDrttocaa TVs, Tliese 
tNnua isjmp, well awei lentl-n^isei-id wilts to Hie CRT 
(Ctftlwric "siy lube) end even tariff o#er Ihe-y'nEswtfchedoll, the y cat give you 
n vary set ietfl jolt H you louch (he wrong hrt" I noct troitlnoly/ hovlno 
dodncc utad m yseii on a T V wrtuch trad been tuned off end ulT'LSBPd br 
haul 



Ffnai Hinlef Is Ihe men tonli-gurfltjle and lleilble Amiga word proceaaor ever. 



11 .., i ., 



■futtun Strip 







lass 




The program lers 
Yiu define your 
own buttons 50 
thai often used 
options, or Ire- 
quenlly repeated 
actions can be 
reduced la n tin* 
gls click. 



When it comes to flexibility, they 
simpiy don't come any more flexible 
than Final Writer. 

Designing the 'perfect' word pro- 
cessor is an extremely drfficuft, if nol 
impossible (ask. The trouble is, 
everyone has a different idea about 
what makes a good package; some 



might say fonts, whilst others prefer 
editing options, whilst slid others feel 
(hat graphic handling ts crucial. 

Softwood have realised this prob- 
lem, and whilst they don't claim that 
Final Writer is by any means perfect, 
they have adopted a clever 
approach to the problem, What 



PROTEXT 5 

£152.75 - ARNOR - 0733 68909 



yPTLXf try. 53J <. > iMMjj Hr nor 



«9Tf HOttf HP I COM rUvi-v <npcrtintl 

-18 r«i USE ONLY A LETTFBS HRftMtKlVL HHHE or »th#r-» disks mni) 

•ITU OMUI DH1: JH»: «*c . . is GQDOII 

UOUK ! SYSILM: D.DHB: IS eAD I I I 

2, SSSICtt in ilh»r ■«•, <Hint> - Clt/Sh*H (unninill 

■ liLr. thi liil of kfv iliCtflH.nl.: 

Hold d«in tl» "HCUf* «ev *n the prn«r*i» 

. IMPORT HUT: 



^'rf.'L'Jf.'ll :;.!■: 

a pkmaaantly 
uncluttered 
screen, but 
hi ukdi-n ;nv,;iy 
Inside iix frjfl. 
ture packed 
menu* you'll 
find the sort of 
options thai 

' I I ■■• it =!■-- 1 

for profe*- 
eionaJ writer*. 



For serious word processing without 
the frills, Protext is the only oplion 
worth considering. 

It has none of the graphics or font 
handling options offered by the other 
packages reviewed so far, but what il 
does have are loads of options tor 
the power user; you know, (he sort of 
person who types 1 0,000 words a 
week, and knows (he keyboard shorf 
cuts for every option in Word Perfect 
Speaking of Word Perfect, that pro- 
gram used to be a serious contender 
for Protext but sadly il is no longer 
being produced on the Amiga. 

Sut back to Ptot&xt;it naturally 
contains a spell checker, which can 
also be used to work out anagrams, 
and il also supports a gaggle of for- 
eign languages. 

Although it doesn't exactly sup- 
port the range of fonts that the 
flashier programs do, il nevertheless 



offers you (he greatest control over 
your printer of all the programs 
reviewed here because you can 
actually program your printer with it 
directly, 

II also contains its own built-in 
macro language, so commonly per- 
formed tasks, as well as frequently 
lyped words or phrases, can be 
reduced to a couple of key presses. 

CONCLUSION 

Personally, I teel <ha< Profexfs user- 
interface oould do with some work, 
especially (he file requesters, 
However, l know that hundreds of 
people swear by the program, and 
couldn't live without it for a second. 
It's undoubtedly very powerful, but 
you should try to gel a demo before 
you buy. 

Requires any Amiga 
with 1 meg of RAM. 



they've done is give (he user a num- 
ber o! definable buttons and menus, 
and what these do is entirety up (o 
you. Although these buttons work in 
much l he same way as the Genies 
which caused such a sensation 
when they appeared in Professional 
Page, you don't need a knowledge 
of AFexx in order to use them. 

Final Writer is essentially Final 
Copy 3, sharing many features of the 
earlier programs, and enhancements 
which are direct evolutions of options 
in Final Copy 2. It's graphics han- 
dling for example, is even more 
flexible, and you can draw and rotate 
structured images with ease. 

It is perhaps in the area of profes- 
sional word processing features that 
Final Writer really excels. It's now 
possible to automatically generate 
tables ol contents, indexes, bibli- 
ographies and even tables of 
illustrations used in your document. 

One of many unique features is 
the program's outline option. This 
allows you to create headed sections 
which can be expanded to reveal the 
full text, or collapsed so that only the 
headings are visible. This is ideal 
when you need to plan the way that 
long or com plicated documents 



shoufd be structured. 

In fact. Final Writer does treat 
text differently to its predecessors, 
allying itself mora with desk (op pub- 
lishing programs. Text is entered 
normally, but is treated as a block, 
and these blocks can be moved 
around Ihe page or the document as 
it they were objects jus! like a 
graphic image 

If you're using the program for 
malhs based work, perhaps in con- 
junction with a database or 
spreadsheet, its ability to perform 
maths on columns of numbers is 
also invaluable, meaning that you 
don't have to keep swapping pro- 
grams. 

CONCLUSION 

Final Writer is a lovely package, 
which provides undoubtedly the best 
oulpul of any Amiga word processor 
or word publisher, terms which no 
longer seems adequate to encom- 
pass the breadth of its scope. 
Professional authors, or those who 
want professional results, will be 
hard pushed to find another Amiga 
program with so much lo offer. 
Requires kicks (art 1.3. 1,5 
megs of RAM and a hard, **m^^ 



CYGNUS ED PRO 

£99.99 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION • 081 543 3500 



When you don't care about the lay- 
out of a piece of text as much as its 
content, and the ease with which il 
was prepared, maybe Cygnus has 
something lo offer you. 

Alihough it claims to be suitable 
for programmers and writers, I per- 
sonally prefer a word processor 
which offers decent text formatting 
and juslificalion options, as well as a 
diclionary, 

Cygnus Ed offers neither of Ihese 
options, but it does have bucket- 
loads of feaiurcs that programmers 
will appreciate, including a very easy 
to use Macro facility and powerful 
search and reptace options. 

It also offers an infinite Undo 
option which is limited only by the 



amount of memory you have. 

Although I don't program, I often 
use its column cut oplion which lets 
me cut and paste column blocks of 
text; an option which is quite simply 
impossible with a word processor- 
Full Arexx and clipboard support 
means that you can easily integrate 
Cygnus into your programming envi- 
ronment, patching the program so 
that it automatically communicates 
with compilers and the like, 

CONCLUSION 

Cygnus is not for anyone who likes 
to be mollycoddled, but for program- 
mers and comma users it is 
invaluable. -~-v-w 

Requires Kickstart 1 .3 j_- vJS 



Cane » I I 



connect mi VCR 2 to tn» OCtfrm output, HouldiT 
, fTSr.SJf'TE; jr ou fi'.*i* b«|UM •ytr-^thlno ujrkfH t krit t Lh# . Hith thisil 



i|M» ; !iij|" iiirrmmri) ind 




I valu 



Cnrurlam a 1987-1*93 Cv 



Cppur L ar 



imoft !cf<inr« 




If*fiJ h ,no V StTli*lli^l3BT"* lw * *° "** ■"" <""" 1 " «*»■•» but If. p. id foril 

US fliitnbutiiri HKnncf or* the l*j-^ T »l Vidio ioittir deolara tail 

5 D ss!£M?s ii ;sT^4HnS%u&4j a r A}s c EirsPs£iBf.*Sf^ 

lK?£iSft%r.?fKS"EB. e K:fc r .K: ™" td " lS not "* ? -fin it. .Hm 



n "u< t hj. r 



fin innniinr. Iin*a«l I Urtr . I lu I* l-h» arrlu.l ilf II 

The program cotmos wiih Iota of uaelul technical h»tura» including the option to erltal chancier ■ 
using Iheir ASCII values. 



7t 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 BUSinCSS 



SBASE PERSONAL 4 

£149.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



IMlHii J ^i r nr ii BiuHnW>MJ i iWKJfiJ T L»^ i ? 







ill 



■* Hti« fm" 



n* 



IfCtll 



J« 



i «■ i 



IH!<I» 

<~ Trimll 






> fticiiv* 



1J»* 






I - 14HBEH 


i ■ RC-WI 


jmn«m» 






tt-dl*l raih»r 



nariHi 4 n k t L a * I B*ti<a »r«MJ»»c» 



|ibo« 



C*nc«t 



TTST 



*i 



- I — ] 



TtTTJT-^T^rr 



Although il costs eonsidBrably leex than 11s ofeaUgiaua relalivs, SBme 
Personal gull Dffe-rH tcrnim* support so lhat you can linh your database up 
lo others by phone. 




If you need the 
user-friendli- 
ness of SBase, 
but not all of its 
features. Ihen 
SBass 
Personal is 
aimed at you. 

The pro- 
gram uses Ihe 
same basic 
interface, com- 
plete with video 
sty la controls, 
however options such the Database Management Language have been removed. 

For the beginner this is no problem at all, because chances are you 
wouldn't have known that such features were possible, much less that you 
needed them, or could have utilised them. 

Unlike SBase Pro. which come? in a large box the size or a 4B bar packet 
of Weetabix, SBase Personal is supplied in more modest packaging. The rea- 
son I mention this, is because easy to use or not. it does lend to be just the 
slightest tad off-putting when you see program manuals thai dwarf Ihe 
Encyclopedia Britannica falling out of the box! Fortunately SSaseonly requires 
you to read a single (admittedly chunky) manual 

CONCLUSION 

If your business is small enough to worry about the expense of SBase Pro. 
ihen you didn't need il in the first place and SSase Persona/ is ideal tor you. It 
can handle databases containing up lo 16 million records and up to 17 giga- 
bytes [17.000 megabytes) in size. I seriously doubt that even British 
Telecom's national directory is that large! A lirst class program, but not cheap 
by any means. 

Requires Amiga DOS 2.0 or higher and 1 meg RAM 



PR0DATA 

£99.87 ■ ARN0R - 0733 68909 

Although it's been around tor a while now, Prodata offers a good reliable text 
only database, and at a price that doesn't need your bank manager's written 
approval in triplicate 

Like Protext, Prodata uses a rather spartan command- based interface to 
gel you going, although once you've chosen your initial options it does let you 
control things via menus. 

It's a fairly simply program in thai the records of your database may only be 
texl, dates or numbers (including the results of calculations). In most cases 
this is all you'll ever need because, after all, how often do you need to refer- 
ence hundreds of pictures or sound samples? 

It uses dynamic fields so that each record only occupies as much space in 
memory and on disk as it needs, rather than a predelined amount of space, 

Prodata is a relational system and with a maximum of 300 fields per record 
provides more lhan enough scope tor any home or small office database that I 
can imagine, 

CONCLUSION 

Nol as llashy or powerful as Oxxi's databases, bui a lot cheaper. A surpris- 
ingly robust little program, which will require you lo read a small and well 
written but uninspired manual to get going. 
Compatible: Any Amiga. 

ic; NPnor rj« 



i luiuitin ui 



Open: <8 F> flDDRFILE 
Printer SIMPLE 



Recs: 



Set: HL 




81 Surnane: 

82 First N an e 

83 flddressl : 
94 flddress2: 
B5 Rddress3: 

06 Address**: 

07 Post Code: 
88 Te lepho-ne : 



Broun 

Janes 

1 6 West End Lane 

New Town 

Southunbr ta 

ST3 2BT 



Although it dwnn I suppori [he variety ol dala types tf»*l the Sffases do, Prodata is likely la be 
tidnquiiic lor address dala and that kind <j( thing. 



SBASE PROFESSIONAL 4 

£299.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



^-L 



SBase 



4 



""■"' *■• : . .« i —"i *■ i " I - ' I 



We live in an age where we am 
required to process ever increasing 
amounts of information. The ability 
to manage 1 that information efficiently 
and quickly can mean the difference 
between failure and success. SBase 
give you the edge you need. 

Database creation and manage- 
ment shouldn't have fa reo, uire a 
degree in programming and busi- 
ness studies, yet such programs on 
the supposedly industry leading PC 
often require huge efforts to create 
relativefy simple databases. SBase 4 
sticks two fingers up at such com- 
plex ways of working, and lets you 
get straight into the action as il were. 

It's a relational database that 
uses a very graphical user- interface 
which is closely modelled on VCR 
style controls. At Ihe bottom of the 
screen you'll see a number of but- 
tons representing options such as 
Neixt Ftocord, Fast Forward, Stop 
and so on. Although Okm constantly 
compare these buttons to video play- 



SUase4 



HHt : Has t c s/sBasgyra/l Jt<s/(.hp_^_ilat«ltMt indexed oji i. 



ers, show me the video 
that lets you jump to the 
start or end of a tape! 

Anyway, SBase lets 
you store a vast selection 
of different data types 
including text, numerical 
data, sound samples, pic- 
tures (stored as IFF, PCX 
or GIF images) and formu- 
lae, its text 'handling, the 
most basic requirement of 
a database, is superb, lit can handle 
single fields up to agqq characters in 
length in scrollable hoses, 

Once you've djefined a database, 
you can also design forms with 
which to display or print your data. 
These forms may include pictures 
directly, or can incorporate gadgets 
which will display a picture or replay 
a sound sample when clicked upon. 

The program even offers support 
for networked computers, as well as 
modem links to remote terminals. To 
my knowledge, it's Ihe only Amiga 
database to include such features, 

A II hough SBase Pro 4 is powerful 
when its features are accessed via 
menus ele, lo elicil the true power of 
Ihe program, you'll want to master 
the database management language 
or DML. This is a derivative of Basic 
which includes a lot of database spe- 
cific commands, With DML it's 



Click on th* first box icon and draw a recUmll like this 
Select a contrasting color and th«n click on th« T icon and 
type in text after noving the poinUr to the desired poilti 
within the box and clicking on In* forn. 

By c I ickins <tn ttt« italics icon^ tA* text can be in it* (id 
or bold or under (< fie if the other t¥P* style icons <*/■# U**4 



To add fields to a fom, first open the databtf* t>v 
the cortnand sequence Project Htnu/Open/SBast F I I • 
The click on the FLD icon i ft th» tool box below, houe the 
pointer to the desired position on the forn uhtrt wou want 
th# tft»ld to appear, click on the forn and thru select the 
field nane fron the requester- To create this forn use 
the database file Chp_2-da t abas* ■ 
Save the forn uith the Save connand. 



The progfam's video slyle controls mean that you can negotiate your way around (Mb largest 
database* quickly and easily. 



possible to create an automated 

database environment in which the 
user has to do little more than 
respond to questions in order lo 
update dala. 

The program is a relational 
database and this can sometimes be 
tncky to understand . However, 
thanks to the graphical way fields 
can be represented whilst defining 
relationships, the whole process is 
made considerably easier, 

CONCLUSION 

SSase Professional 4 is no 
lightweight either in terms of price or 
features. To get the most from it, 
you'll need to invest a fair bit of time, 
I don't want to beat about the bush; 
there's simply nothing else on Ihe 



Amiga that even plays in the same 
league as this program, If you need 
lo run a business, regardless of its 
siee, this is the program to entrust 

you r data to , /iTV^h 

Any Amiga with 1 VJ^j£ 
meg RAM, 

Use SBase Pro's form atahjiw \o make sure all 
i s presenled in (he mosteffpc!i« manner. 











fTwiWt— mr ^jLlrmmi mwC ^iflnamfa fwrf 
















&*0*-<fJ4* 



72 



Business amiga buyers guide 94 






INTEROFFICE 

£49.99 - KOMPART UK - 0727 868005 



A word processor, dalabase and 
spreadsheet are the most popular 
business app hca! ions and 
InlerActivision offer all three on disk 
or CD ROM tor loss than E5fl. 

The programs were originally 
released nearly three years ago for 
£49.95 each, By bundling all three, 
you get an ideal way of building the 
foundations for your Amiga office in 
one go. 

InterWarcf is Ihe biggest of the 
three programs, both in lerms of 
popularity and design specifications, 
il's a word processor designed to 
cater for every taste. It incorporates 
excellent support for iarge docu- 
ments, with features such as 
automatic spell checking and 
hyphenation and a comprehensive 
choice of statisfe- 

Forthe less demanding user, 
InterWordwiW let you use any fonts 
trial your printer may have, switching 
mid-line if you so desire, it also pro- 
vides intelligent typeface resizing so 
thai if you use double height charac- 
ters,, forexampie, it automatically 
adjusts (tie number of lines per page. 



InterBase is a relational 
database, and although it's very 
powerful, the manual is very difficult 

10 understand,, especially when you 
come to the section on defining reia- 
I ion ships between vanous fields, 

Nevertheless, it's worth persever- 
ing because behind the menus lies a 
very nice program indeed. It sup- 
ports a variety of data types 
including si rings of fixed and 
dynamic length. It can also handle 
IFF pictures, but not sound samples, 
although that's unlikely to be much 
loss to most people. 

Defining a dalabase is very easy 
to do, but woe betide you if you 
should make a mistake whilst defin- 
ing your field names, types or sizes 
because they can't be altered later 
This is a real pain, especially when 
working with fixed lenglh stnngs. 

Once a dalabase is defined, you 
can also define multiple forms with 
which to show all or some of its data. 

11 you have defined relationships with 
other databases, ihen you can even 
create terms which display data from 
two databases at once. 



PEN PAL 



£49.99 • HARW00DS - 0773 836781 





F»n Pal pro* In* J ln« ton 1 1 villi mid Id er**te eff»ctiv» wrltUr 
CDMMuni u-sl Ian . Vou cm treat* tint uslftfi difr*i*»nt fonts, si - 
stylfl, *nd Culor- T»k t ur art iu I omit i CA 1 1 V Around pictures 
even ii you tyji* , Hlth Fan Pal you Can *i< t»*t, graphics 
ptctural. *n<< 4*1* In »*yi no nthur Atilt word pro l* nor can 

Pan PjI is vury JMJi to 3 »arn and use. Hill *urd prncennr has 

been daciffn«il wllh p«u, th* user-, in nlnii. Mvi>ni . MHlie guldai 
ritlari. ud semen i pmvldl* *« Interface thai sljurti nn I I i in 
»tn*f *»*i((* ward prnmiiftfl , 



Craat* fonts Hlth wm whin Ja I* is m ha filled in. 

^ulin --.— * iaj ■ , i r . i i i i * *j^—^MrtMi»inainal 



Vim i:,n 



Although Pen Part ward ptoceasor is quite pl.nin bf today's standards, you 
can incorporate graphtcB and line drawing* "nta yuur (tocumerrts, 



Buying software can be a costly 
business, but one way to reduce 
your expenses is Id buy integrated 
packages lhat incorporate two or 
more programs. Pen Pa/ gives you a 
word processor, database and forms 
manager. 

M was one of the earliest word 
processors that let you incorporate 
graphics into a document, and long 
before the lerm 'hot links' came into 
vogue. Pen Pal was combining three 
productivity programs logether. 

The word processor is quite 
basic, but it does contain a spelling 
checker, and it also allows you to 
use any Bil- mapped Amiga fonts that 
you may own. When il comes to 
printing, Ihe program can be 
extremely quirky, especially if you're 
using graphics. It provides two print 
methods, one of which uses your 
printer's fonts whilst the other simply 
does a screen dump of the current 
page, The latter option is the only 
way to incorporate bit-mapped fonts, 



but the results are very blocfcy and 
not at all suitable for professional 
work. However, using the printer's 
own fonts can mean that the position 
of graphics is wrong for the size of 
fonts your primer uses. 

The database is eslremety 
fngndly to use and allows you to 
incorporate IFF pictures as well as 
BSVX format sound samples. It can 
be linked directly to the word proces- 
sor for creating mail outs, and is 
simply the easiest way of performing 
mail merged documents. 

CONCLUSION 

Pen Pa) is starling to show its age, 

and although it incorporates so-me 
nice features, il's not a very good 
business investment, It's easy 
enough for kids to understand, and 
it's a good way of infusing them with 
enthusiasm to do homework when 
ihe finished results will be bright and 
interesting to look at. 
Any Amiga with 1 meg of RAM. 



\V^ .S3 Pro ject 

JBGH=1|01L 
IT. . .►.,??! 



H*> t C one lo InterHoriT 



RHtl * 



. ILS:lB/68 



. V • I 



DK 26* Pec 1998 



Consi'^tnUtions on your n#W WOfrt ppocessins jp*>oSs*3irt 
]ntei>Uoi>d. I hop* you (/ill find it useful. 



Voui>* faithful li 

P?ter Kim Thorn 
Pt> offf atiner 



tnterWcrdi* a surprising! y poweriul word processor, which it Ideal lot those who believe lhat 
graphiti should be left to a DTP program. 



InterSptvad is a very powerful 
spreadsheet which includes its own 
macro language for automating data 
processing. 1 1 includes all the maihe- 
matical functions you'd expect to find 
in a lirst class program of its type. It 
also includes a graph maker which 
will lets you choose from eight differ- 
ent ways of representing your data. 



CONCLUSION 

Although they may not look as flashy 
as other integrated packages, the 
programs that make up Interoffice 
are very powerful and represent 
great value for money, especially for 
the professional user, ^^^^ 

Compatible: Any Amiga, (t^^^ 



TPSTirr; — hddkc iud 



i finrvna i 



iimi^i B'J 



:iriMn«u* 



D ifferent 

The Munnv or Manses 
Ordinary People 
Silence Of the Lanbs 
The Face of Tear 
Books of Blood 



the Edge 
ses the Danmd 



Carr le ri sher 
Harlan Ellison 
Stephen King 
Unite Rice 
Judith Guest 
Thonas Harris 
Dean R. Koontz 
C I i we Barker 



tntorOftk* I* Ihe only Intagtalsd office aoflwwB pdtkage lhat includes a relational tatabat*. 

PROPER GRAMMAR 2 

£39.95 - SOFTWOOD EUROPE - 0773 836781 



It's one thing to own a word proces- 
sor, but another thing entirely for 

your words to make sense. Thanks 
to this program you can bring a lear 
to your dear old English teacher's 
eye! 

Proper Grammar is designed for 
anyone who cares about making the 
righl impression: for the sort of per- 
son who's not satisfied with simply 
writing intelligible sentences, but 
who want them to stand up to 
scrutiny. So whether you're writing a 
book or job application, Proper 
Grammar wilt make sure you get il 
right 

It checks a vast number of things 
starting with your spelling. It then 
proceeds to check Ihe content in 
which words arc used: to, loo or two 
and that kind of thing. It also checks 

F<-oper Grow war II 



punctuation, so if you use a semi 
colon when a hyphen would have 
done it will tell you, Similarly it'll also 
spot ihose occasions when you use 
two capital letters to start a word 
when you only meant to use one. 
Ironically, it doesn't spot absent capi- 
talization of proper nouns. 

CONCLUSION 

Proper Grammar is a useful pro- 
gram, but in order to derive the best 
Irom it, you need a better than aver- 
age understanding of English in the 
first place otherwise you can't select 
the cc-rreel solution when it highlights 
problems. It can also tend lo make 
your writing a bit dry. Si ill, it works 
well enough, in fact too well at times, 
Requires an Amiga with 1 Mb 
of RAM and hard drive. 




lonsToe^T^onfTrT^iiD^ of -furiU'V 




-Jr-ltino 'IcirH^KsSSnfiroT^roiir II o cnpmart tymfi'J error. ChecK tha aontmt Of 
Ehis word ta d*t»r«lr>e If the prepoirtlon '(rm' should replace "form', 

I 



Continue 



«C*p1q(lh 



loners 



R-Plcoi- : .Jm— ««, 



(Mtf 



E.pUmLtf 'j, i u vo 

fir. John Robert*, 

re i I dent 

obe-rts Softuurt Cownnr 

20 Mum Street 
Heu Prague, MM 53 FBI 

D»ar Mr. Robert*: 

I enjoyed meeting with Ml. Stun and the other •fieifieere UBBD the Design 
Oeportneni. Our di»nuK»iDh» uere 10 productive that I thinfc ue will be able tc 



itolve the last rtmqlnbn-g int*rfaoe lfc*ue soon- 
able ta finish negotiotlma th> contract. 



Ones, it* r«»ul'j*d, ue should 



i 



Proper Gr*mtn*ru*6a tonlext tensilivo onaiyii* m dslnct spelling and grammar misi.-ikus. 



73 



/ 



J * 




jdJbfvJiB 



ujjjpiiijjj^ 

S3 Ormskirk Rd, 

Preston, Lanes, 

PR1 2QP 

Ladbroke Computing 
International are aria m l"* 
Wnjjasil establishes home psnipv1*r *>*lijrs. in 
the U.K. We have dft»*lop*d ;in nuien*™* 
outtumer service policy which involve* lestifva. 
of all Hardware p<K>r to despatch (a enaure that 
good 5 arrive in working order, oH&rlng free 
advice and support over 1he phone ind 
keeping customers informed. Although our 
prices are not always lhe cheapest we do 
enaeavour to after conaotenlly good service 
and backup. 

All prices are correct At COp> rjatt 1/10V93 
i>h.fe slocks 133.11 artd Are *ubj*d k- change 
rtithout prior notice. All prices includ* VAT M 
exclude delivery. 

How to Pay 

You c*fi order by mull ChuquewPostal Orders 
made payable lo Ladbroka Computing. Or give 
your credit card dacailt o«r lhe phone 

Delivery 

Postal dulivory in available on small items 
under £40 (Normally E3. phone lor dataller. 
Add T7 tor courier delivery. Nest working day 
delivery on mainland UK subjecL 1o stock (£20 
tot Saturday oWveryj 

Open Man-Sat 9.30am to a UDpm. 

Ladtxwa Ccfnputing Ltd trading as Ladbrcka 

Compjling Intamalional- 

Fax: (0772)561071 
Tel; 9am~5J0pm (5 Linos) 



FtoeP* <**" Mv»W PacHS H*-" scaR ° 0tS 




Star 

Star LC100 Colour £165.00 

Star LC20 £124.00 

Star LC24/1 00 Mo no £179.00 

StarJet SJ48 Bubblejet £210.00 
SJ48 Sheet Feeder £55.00 

SJ48 Ink Cartridge £19.00 

SJ144 Thermal Transfer 

Co four Printer £569.99 

• 144 Element Print Head 

• Compressed Data Mode 

• fl resident fonts 

• 360dpi resolution 

• Emulate Epson LQ86Q, IBM Pro 
Printer and NEC Graphics. 

Citizen 

C it izen Swift 90 Col ou r £ 1 75.00 
Citizen Swift 240 Colour £270.00 
Citizen 1 24D Special Offer £149,99 

Hewlett Packard 

HP Deskjet 510 £299.99 

HP Deskjet 550 Colour £599.99 

Lasers 

RlCOh LP1200 £759.00 

Add ES for Centronics cable and £7 for 
nest working day courier delivery, 



• SflOK formatted capacity 

• Double sided, Double density 

• Through port 

• Enable & Disable Switch 

• Anti Click 

• Anti Virus Mode 

Roc lite external drive £64.99 

Amiga 500 internal drive £49.99 
Cumana CAX 354 £54.99 



pee 

• 290dpi resolution 

• £ Microswitched buttons 

• Opto/Mechanical mechanism 

• Switchable between Ami gay ST 

• Direct Mouse Replacement 

Speed Mouse 

£11.99 




• Quantum SCSI Hard drive 


• Ultra fast 1 1ms access 




• Up to 8Mb RAM on 


board 


• 2 year warranty 






42Mb No RAM 




£199.00 


80Mb No RAM 




£299.00 


120Mb No RAM 




£39900 


213Mb No RAM 




£564.00 


2Mb SIMM Upgrade 




£B9,99 


4Mb SIMM Upgrade 




£179,99 


8Mb SIMM Upgrade 




£300.00 




Our Service department can repair 
Amiga's in minimum time at competitive 
rates, We can arrange tor courier pickup 
and return delivery of your machine to 
ensure it's safely.. We- even have a 
same day service which will ensure your 
machine i$ given priority and subject to 
fault, completed the same day. We car 
lit memory upgrades, ROM upgrades. 
We offer a Quotation service for £1 5 tor 
which we will examine your machine 
and report back with an exact price lor 
repair. II you do not wish to go ahead 
with the repairs then just pay the £15. 
However il you do go ahead then lhe 
charge is included in the minimum 
charge. Please note: The minimum 
charge covers labour, parts are extra- 



Quotation service 
Mm repair charge 
Courier Pickup 
Courier Return 
Same day service 



£15.00 

£35.25 

£11.00 

£7.00 

£15.00 



Amiga 600 Wild, 

Weird and Wicked Pack £199.99 
Includes A600 with Pushover, 
Microprose Grand Prix, Putty and 
Deluxe Paint III 



Amiga CD 32 £289.99 

Includes Digger S Oscar games 



Amiga 1200 

Race 4 Chase Pack £289.99 

Includes Af 200 with 2Mb RAM, 
Nigel Manseil ( 1 200 version) and 

Trolls {1200 version) 




soft**** 






Mini Office £45.00 

Wordprocessor, Database, Spreadsheet 
Disc Utilities and Graphics 

Pen Pal £45.00 

Powerful worrjproeessor with text 
wrap around graphics, Forms 
manager, Database manager, 
calculated fields etc. 100,000 word 
spelling dictionary, MaN Merge 

Final Copy It £79.99 

Amiga wordprocessor, 1 10,000 word 
spell checker. B26,000 word thesaurus, 
Automatic hyphenation, multiple 
columns, HAM S. 24 bil graphic support, 
Built in Postscripl support 

Deluxe Paint IV AG A £69.99 

Paint and animate in 262,000 colours. 
Developed specifically for the 
Commodore A1200 and A4000, lakes 
full advantage of the new AG A chip 
set. Metamorphosis, instantly 
transform the shape and image of one 
brush inlo any other brush, HAM 
support, Paint stencil mode. 
Translucency and liming features for 
special effects. Requires 2Mb RAM. 
kickstart 2.04 or greater 

falcon 030 

% 16MHz 32 bil 6SO30 Central 
Processor, 16MHz Slitter, 
32MHz 56001 Digital Signal 
Processor 

• 1.44Mb 3.5" Floppy, up to 14Mb 
RAM. Displays 65536 colours 
from 262144 palette al 768 X 480 
resolution 

• 8 Channel, 16 bit. Stereo sound 
sampling 

FALCON 4Mb 120Mb HD £999.00 
FALCON 4Mb No HO £779.00 

FALCON 1Mb No HD £589.00 





Philips 8833 MKII £199.99 

Includes 12 Months on site warranty 
[Mainland UK) and free Lotus Turbo 
Challenge 2 game 

Corn modore 1 084S Colour £159.99 

Amiga Colour, stereo monitor 
including cable 

Microvitech 1440 £399,99 

14" Colour SVGA Monitor, 

.28 do! pitch. 

Phone for Commodore Adaptor 

Colour 5 VGA M on i to r £239.99 

High quality Colour SVGA Monitor, 
.28 dot pilch. Includes Falcon Adaptor 

Falcon VGA Adaptor £9.99 

Philips SCART to Amiga £9.99 

8833 MKII to Amiga £9.99 



*. 



Golden Image Hand Scanner 

• 100, 200, 300, 40Odpi resolutions 

• 1 letter mode, 3 photo modes 

• Includes two of the most 
respected graphics packages, 
MJGRAPH'STOUCHUPand 
DELUXE PAINT III 

£89.99 

While stocks last 
A500 51 2K upgrade 

£14.99 

A500+ 1Mb upgrade 

£19.99 

A 600 1Mb with clock 

£44.99 

Plugs straight into A6Q0 trap door, 
compatible with AGOO, A600HD 

EBtccessories 

50 3.5" Disks £23.50 

100 3.5" Disks £44.65 

3.5" Disk head cleaner £4.00 

50 Disk Box £5.00 

100 Disk Box £8.00 

A500 Dustcover £4.00 
Mouse/Joystick extension £5.00 

PRO 500 Joystick £7.00 

'iSM Mont""* ffff 



Business amiga buyers guide 94 



MINI OFFICE 

£59.99 - EUROPRESS SOFTWARE - 0625 859444 




If you're relatively new to compil- 
ing, the way a program handles is 
probably more important lo you 
lhan the features it offers. Mini 
Office looks Slick and feels great. 

II incorporates a word processor, 
database, spreadsheet and disk 
utility tool. 

As with all of the programs, the 
word processor looks fantastic, 
although being written in AMOS 
means thai it won't mu Hi -task, 
which is a serious limitation In my 
estimation. 

Ignoring that fact, it really is a 
very attractive piece of software, all 
be it a simplistic one. Sure it has a 
spell checker and you can even 
incorporate graphics and insert mail 



merged data, but that's pretty much 
it. For willing letters or doing home- 
work, you don't need much more,. 
but that's just as well. 

The database, too, is quite lim- 
ited, and is certainly the least 
powerful of all the ones reviewed in 
this magazine. It is not relational, 
and it can't handle pictures or sam- 
ples. What it does- do, however, is 
provide you with a very easy to 
learn and elegant to use system 
which is more than adequate for 
address databases and the tike. 
Remarkably, given its simplistic 
nature, when it comes to performing 
filtered searches the database is 
actually easier to use than pack- 
ages costing five times as much, 



Although it's likely to be the least 
used part of the program, the 

spreadsheet is Still rather basic. 
Overlooking (he limited grid size 
thai is available, the program lets 
you use a selection of mathematical 
and trigonometric lunctions. 
Unfortunately the program's editing 
functions are also somewhat 
restricted and even using the 
mouse to define a block can be a 
nuisance if the block is bigger than 
the visible screen. 

There's also a very tasty graph 
printing program included which can 
output tons of different graphs. This 
is made less friendly by the fact that 
you need to define and save the 
spreadsheet data to be made into a 



graph before the program can han- 
dle it. if the programs multi-tasked 
Ihis wouldn't be a problem, but it's a 
real pain having lo quit one to ioad 
the other. 

CONCLUSION 

Although the individual programs 
are compelenf enough for ngvice 
users, if as much attention had 
been paid to the program's content, 
as to their appearance we'd be a lot 
better off. I have lo admit that i don't 
like these programs, but I could see 
how some people might find the 
slick design reassuring. 

Compatible: Any 
Amiga with 1 meg of 
HAM. 



KSPREAD 2 & K-DATA 

£39 .95 ■ HISOFT ■ 0525 713671 



VJIU* 



=4 




/\/\/\/\/V/\/S^\/\y\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/'X/\/\/\/\/\/" 




Kipread is a competent, but not enreeiionai. spreadsheet. I like the way that it ghosts label cells to differentials them Irom Ihe others. 



be a disadvantage for more power 
hungry users, but as a home pack- 
age it won't make any difference. 
Also on Ihe same disk is another 

version of the program which gives 
you the option lo print graphs of 
your data. By providing two entirely 
separate programs, Hisoft let you 
make the most efficient use of your 
machine, especially il you're short 
on memory. 

K-Daia is yet another straight for- 
ward database, but it fakes an 
original approach which slightly com- 
pensates for its lack of features. It is 
not relational, nor does, it even 
accept pictures or sound samples, 

test dat .KDFJiaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaal 




but il is ideal for the storage and 
organisation of textual data, 

It offers all Ihe usual data types: 
fixed and variable length text strings, 
dates, plus a special one called an 
Enumerated Value Field; a multiple 
choice field in other words, This 
means that you could define a field 
with three or four choices each of 
which is represented by a button 
when you're entering data. 

CONCLUSION 

K-Data is a surprisingly neal little 
program, and the Enumerated Value 
Field is ideal when designing 
databases that are lo be used by 
those who are not particulary good 
with computers or keyboards. Easy 
to use and with a well written man- 
ual, but not reaily very flexible or 
powerful. 

Compatible: Any 
Amiga. 



(%p* 



The program will Hal yrxjr records, showing 
only the key fields lor ease at access. 



td*t -KDF 

IfJIMJiCTM 



[Wining YOur data i* «a*y. although In* chain! 

Perhaps based on the assumption 
that the first productivity program 
every user buys is a word processor, 
Hisoft have omitted one from their 
package and simply given you a 
spreadsheet and database instead. 

K-Spfead\s currently up to ver- 
sion 4, but by including version 2 in 
this double pack, Hisoft have 
ensured that serious users will want 
to upgrade, whilst less serious ones 
will nevertheless receive a workable 
product. 

The program is certainly less 



data types is quite limited. 

visually attractive man the Mini 
Office spreadsheet, but at the same 
time it is more functional and 
includes mouse editing options that 
the former program should have 
contained. 

Us interface is very uncluttered 
and by automatically giving labels a 
different coloured background it's 
easy to identify the different ele- 
ments of a sheet. 

The program's inability to 
exchange data with other industry 
standard spreadsheet programs will 



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lit- nt <ii.- Htthael 

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Having defined a database wllh KO-Dwrsn\ a ncond preijjriimt efllk=d f P-P*1v is ni^iid 10 Attu- 
illy nrrnr (hi? 0*1*. 



79 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 BllSJIieSS 



HOME ACCOUNTS 2 



E54.99 - DIGITA - 0395 270273 




f ^3 




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Despite its title, Home Accounts 2 
can aiso deal with your business 
accounts loo. 

Whereas Cashbook Controller is 
designed to track the ebb and flow of 
your business finances on a monthly 
basis. Home Accounts 2 is geared 
towards the sort of day to day 
requirements that let you know 
exactly how much you have in your 
bank account at any given second. 

It lets you log both income and 
expenses and the Salter can be 
grouped into a variety of pre-defined 
or user-defined categories. 

The program can also cope with 
regular outgoings to which com- 
pound interest has to be added, 
including Mortgage and HP pay- 
ments. 

With the option to warn you when 
any of your accounts tails below or 
exceeds certain limits, Home 



> Accounts 2 ia designed lo help you to 
keep detailed daily records ol your expendi- 
ture and income. *irilh pplinnj ror budget 
loreesiling and compound Interest as well. 

Accounts is the perfect program for 
balancing your chequebook and 
managing your bank accounts. 

If all the data seems a bit intimi- 
dating, you can choose to view il in 
graph form, and you can even define 
budget predictions against which 
comparisons may be made, 

CONCLUSION 

Although the first version of (his pro- 
gram was a Utile clunky, Home 
Accounts 2 is a very polished prod- 
uct, and its relationship to 
Wanjworth is clearly visible in ils 
user-friendly interface, If you have 
trouble controlling your finances, this 
could be your saving grace. 



Requires Kickstart 1.3 or 
higher and 1 mb at RAM. 



f^fo 



DAY BY DAY 

£29.99 -DIGITA -0395 270273 



As our lives become more and more 
busy, the need to become organised 
is ever greater if we are to survive 
without leaving a trail of forgotten 
errands, appointments, bills and 
birthdays. 

Day By Day is an electronic 
organiser and calendar. If incorpo- 
rated into the startup sequence of 
your hard drive-based Amiga, you'll 
never overlook another important 
event again. 

When the program first loads, it 
will display all "Urgent' messages- 
Urgent messages are simply those 
that you've specified as being so 
important that you want to be 



Workbench Screen 
■y By Da 



.i 12 Nov 1993 

■ ifrmMEm mat jc mn 

I 12 Mow 1993 
inch with t tie> president 



reminded of them each time you load 
the program. 

By selecting forward you can also 
look at any overdue messages as 
well as those that apply to the next 
six days. 

Basically the program lets you 
attach messages to any date of the 
year, reminding you about them as 
the date approaches. Vou can also 
create messages which will only be 
displayed for a certain duration (ideal 
rl you want to be reminded lo stad 
saving for a birthday present!). 

CONCLUSION 

If like me, you lend to be so busy 
thai you forget to pay bills, 
you forget to do jobs, and you 
even forget to put out ihe 

dustbin bags, then this mighl 
be a good solution, if you're 
running the program from a 
hard drive, you don't even 
have lo remember to load it 
up in ihe first place! 

Compatible: 
Any Amiga. 



(PJpeu (N)ext < H > dd (D)e 



CASHB00K CONTROLLER/ 
FINAL ACCOUNTS 



£79.99 - DIGITA • 0395 270273 



Few business tasks are more ardu- 
ous or time consuming than doing 
the accounts. Casnbook Controller 
relieves some of the burden. 

In a nutshell the program is used 
lo track the flow of cash in and out of 
your company, (t can be used to 
record all expenditure on a monthly 
basis,, and income over the same 
period, With that information i| can 
then produce detailed profit and loss 
accounts which will reveal the true 
trends your business may be taking. 

It allows you lo enter bank and 
cash transactions and will provide 
VAT breakdowns at your request. In 
fact il even allows you lo specify a 
variety of rales. 

Also on ihe disk is Final 
Accounts, a program which can only 
be loaded via Cashbook Controller 



and which is a module designed to 
present your accounts information in 
a concise and intelligible form. 

CONCLUSION 

Cashbook Controller is a fairly spar- 
tan program, but that's tor the better 
because if you've loaded it simply to 
input the day's transactions you 
don't want to be swamped by unnec- 
essary options, It seems to perform 
ils job adequately, but then that's not 
asking much. Using it will save you a 
great deal.ol time over the pencil 
and paper method, and although a 
spreadsheet could be designed to 
fulfil the same function, this is a 
much more elegant solution to your 
business accounting needs. _ 

Compatible: Any ^Tf^h 

Amiga. w <4jjP 



Controller will 
provide a 5 um- 
mary oryour 

company'"* 
1irt»iiees at any 
lime. 



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SYSTEM 3 



£59.99 - DIGITA - 0395 270273 






Dd* 

Stack Code 

De scrip t*ion 

Quant t tv 

Unit Stack Prire 

Un il Sell ing l*i ii- e 

l"l i n i m un Levt 1 

Re-Order Quantity 

S LI |a p 1 L C* r 


lid 


Stock Record 
«81 




Irurrv Midgets 








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System 3s stock control module lets you automate your rs-orderino, and inventory proce*wt*. 



Day oy Day will make sura that you 
never forget another important 
event again. 



Representing the Amiga's only stock 
control and invoicing program, 
Digita's System 3 still looks as good 
today as it always did. 

It combines three programs: 
Cashflow Controller, Invoicing and ' 
Slock Control, the I after pair of which 
work in conjunction with each other. 

The Cashflow Controller's based 
upon Home Accounts 1, and simply 
lets you store an itemised break- 
down of your company's income and 
expend itu re. However, the Invoicing 
and Stock Control modules are the 
most useful parts of this program. 

The Stock Control module lets 
you keep detailed lists of stock, pro- 
ducing re-order reports on demand 
thanks lo its minimum re-order 
option. This is something like a giant 
stock database, but with the ability to 
intelligently analyse the items con- 



tained in the listing. 

By contrast the Invoicing module 
is responsible for creating profes- 
sionally formatted invoices, but better 
yet if can be linked to the Stock con- 
trol module so thai products which 
are invoiced are automatically deb- 
ited from the available stock list. 

CONCLUSION 

System 3 is a greatly under mar- 
keted product and now that the 
Amiga is so popular perhaps it mighl 
pay Digita to give it another push. 
Although you could probably gel by 
with a database and word processor, 
these programs are ideally designed 
for the kind of data processing 
involved in a small distribution, retail 
or hire business. 

Compatible: Any 
Amiga. 



78 



Business amiga buyers guide -94 



OPUS DIRECTORY 4 

£59.00 - INNOVATRONICS - 0707 662861 



V U( iP .V - 



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EHV 

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MU 

Bas ics 

C 

C lasses 

Devs 

Doun loads 

DTP 

Expans ion 

Fonts 

GAMES 

Kill Hi.n 




upon which mouse button is 
pressed. The actions mitiated by 
pressmg the buttons can be defined 
by one of many pre-defined choices, 
or you can specify scripts to be exe- 
cuted it more complicated 
sequences of commands need to be 
performed. 

If the execution of a script neces- 
sitates further input from the user 
when that script is executed (archiv- 
ing a file tor instance) then a 
requester will pop up 35 the appro- 
priate button is selected. 

CONCLUSION 

Directory* Opus is undoubtedly the 



Opus Oittetati it «id*lv acknowledged a& 
being 1tie beat directory and CLI replacement 
program av.-iiljiMu tor (In Amiga, 



The Disk Operating System is the 
main interface tor communicating 
with your computer, and the CLI or 
shell is the place where you can do 
that. Unfortunately, this means thai 
you'll need to know at least a few 
rudimentary commands. Unless, of 
course, you use Directory Opus. 

Directory Opus takes a(E ol the 
main housekeeping and disk manip- 
ulation commands and gadgelis.es 
them so that they can be performed 
by clicking a mouse button rather 
than typing in commands. 

It lets you use frequently per- 
formed operations such as file 
copying, moving and renaming with 
ease. However u also lets you acti- 
vate stand alone programs which 
themselves in some way manipulate 
data. For example you can activate 
an archrver which will archive a num- 
ber of files, or you can activate a 



Conf igOput 4 . T t 



Foreground 



M 



GetS izes 



Background 

■ I 



Han* lamtiTT 



Shortcut fc#v | CONTROL * '0.' 
Hfrh> tntp" ( Cwmind 0»tSizt-» 

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Swap 



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i><? iMkw 



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Flag*, 



Ok my 



I 



<.0 d«si inat ipn 
CD so ur r. e 
Directory Opus 
Do all tiles 



to front 



Stack size) ffCTT 
trior It v |eT~ 
Close delay |2 



Cancel 



module player in order to listen to 
music medufes. 

The beautiful thing about Opus is 
thai it's so configurable; the user can 
specify just about every single tiny 
aspect of ihe program ranging from 
the function its buttons perform, to 
the colour at the screen. 

By selecting the Configure Option 
from Ihe main menu, you'll be trans- 
ported to a configuration section 



Irom where you can tailor the pro- 
gram to /our every whim. 

The key to this configuration sec- 
lion is the fact that you can 
reprogram the buttons to do just 
about anything, and if l here are nol 
enough buttons, you can simply add 
entirely new banks of Ihem. 

Each button can be programmed 
to perform two functions, and the 
□ no that's selected fs dependent 



Einh button can programmed to ("Kil » wnriciy 
ar lunctiuns, according haw it's pressed. 

most powerful CLI replacement and 
directory tool available for the 
Amiga, and whilst it is something of 
an acquired taste, those who use it 
regularly would not use anything 
else. For many people, this is as 
near as they'll ever need lo come to 
programming on the Amiga 
Compatible: Any Amiga. 




SID 2 



$25 - TIMM MARTIN 

To Amiga purists, SID was the origi- 
nal and is still the friendliest directory 
utility available, Version 2 is the first 
and only commercial version. 

Whilst it doesn't have anywhere 
near as much power as Directory 
Opus, it uses a slightly friendlier 
interlace which some people find 
easier to get along with. 

The basic program comes with 
many more redefined buttons than 
Opus, and like its rival you can 
always define more if you need 
them. Unlike Opus, each button only 
serves a single purpose, and if you 
want to do more, you'll need to 
define another button. Switching 
between button banks is easy; just 
press the right mouse button whilsl 
the cursor's in the bottom halt of the 
screen and the nest bank will appear. 

Many operations involve a source 
and destination directory, and whilst 



irt in I F I O I R I M I S I ^ l-OH ^»M 5 I 1 966C 3163T B2:BB:4Ban 




I 



hob: 



f:Ti!:l 
READ 




ClXlMUSlhTiMrrrnpHBlDFB 
MOVE COPY I PROTECT 



HQUE HS COPY WSi SET 



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S.7H Fre* **je/«1 9 riles 



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BYTES ALL 



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LISTRRC 



DISK IBV NAME I UNRRC 
1 . 7M Free 



Whilst SIP 2 a nowhere noar at powerful *» P/recrcwy Opus, il s 75% cheaper, and eom* poopl* find it friendlier to u*>? 



both programs provide you with two 
windows so that you can viaw both 
directories at once, only SfD pro- 
vides separate directory buttons for 
each window, a feature which for 
me, at least, ensures that I'll con- 
tinue using it alongside ihe 



olherwise superior product from 
Innovatronics. 

CONCLUSION 

Whilst SfD is by no means as pow- 
erful as Directory Opus, it contains 
90% of ihe features you're likely to 



need, and il is just that bit friendlier 
to use. At only 25 dollars it's cheap 
enough for virtually anyone to 
afford. An ideal program tor the less 
demanding computer user, ^_— 

Compatible: Any t^T^Sh 

Amiga. s^^^i 



77 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 BUSJIieSS 



II we've swept you ol your feel with our 
whirlwind guide to Business software , here's 
where we br-ny ym down lo earth with our 
comprehensive guide Id all Ihe Jargon we've 
used in (his section 

• Altai - The Amiga version ol the Hen 
language which allows inter-program com- 
municaEidit and. more import* nlly, il I Bis you 
automate your use ol any program thai sup- 
ports it. 

• ASCII - American Standard Coda lor 
Information Interchange. The term given lo 
the standard set ol codes repress riling text 
characters and a lew basic commands such 
as backspace return, etc. 

• Bit-mapped fonl ■ A lent which is stored al 
a pa lieu lar size a s a p i a el i ma ge . 

4 Clip art - Graphics ol usually generic 
themes (animals, machinery, signs, etc) 
which can be easily incorporated info a doc- 
ument to pew it up. 

4 Clipboard ■ An area at memory ol variable 
size which is used by programs lo store tem- 
porary information. The clipboard differs 
from normal HAM in lhal data stored In It 
can be accessed by any program thai sup- 
ports the appropriate data type. 

• CnmpugraphiG tonts - A particular type ot 
scalable font, a version ol which was 
adopted by Commodore as the one thai 
would be included with all Ami gas running 
Workbench 2 or higher. 

■ Database - Reters either to a program 
which can store data which has been classi- 
fied under user-delined headings, or to the 
actual data itself. For example, a database 
program is used-to store a list ol people's 
na mes a od ad dresses , bul at lh i same ti me 
that list can be retorted to as an address 
database. 

• Dynamic Field - A database field lhal 
modifies the amount of memory it occupies 
according lo Ihe sine of each individual item 
of data stored In It. This is In contrast lo 
Tiied fields which allocate a sped lie amount 
of memory tor each data item regardless ol 
its actual requirements. 

e) Encapsulated Postscript File -A special 
format I or staring page layout information. If 
includes any bil-mapped images on Ibe page 
as we 1 1 a s a 1 1 fonts used i n its le it. It also 
describes the aspect ratio ol all elements on 
the page. It's the nearest thing we have to a 
cross -computer industry standard for Ihe 
exchange of page descriptions (word proces- 
sor DTP and graphic pages). 

• EPSF - See previous entry. 

• Field ■ The name given to one data head- 



JARGON EXPLAINED! 



ibe 



ing in a database Fur e (ample In an address 
database you could have first name, street 
name or telephone number fields, 

• Field Types - Refers lo llie sort ol informa- 
tion lhal can be stored In a database lie Id - 
graphics, numbers, sound, text, calculations 
or dates for example. 

• Form - A template into which database 
inlormaliun can be Inserted In an easy to 
read and printable format. 

• Interface - The link between one thing and 
another. For example a printer Interlace 
|oins a computer lo a primer. 

• Jaggies- The visible 'steps' caused when 
a bil-mapped image is enlarged Sulliclently 
to see Ihe individual pixels that comprise 
angled lines, 

• Justification The process of aligning (exf 
with various parts ol the paper so thai il 
achieves a spetilic visual result. For 
instance lelt justification means that Ihe left 
edge of a text block will be perfectly straight 
whilst the right edge will be ragged. 

• Macro ■ A series ol commands which are 
activated with a single command or key 
press. Designed lo simplify complex or 
repetitive tasks. 

• Mail Merge - The ability lo incorporate 
database inlurmaliG-rt Into a document, 
Usually used to insert customer's or mem- 
ber's private details into letters so they are 
personalised. 

• Network ■ Two or more computers linked 
ellh er directly to each other or via server so 
that they can pool information resources, or 
that of ihe server. 

• Postscnpl -A. limited version of EPSF met 
doesn't contain loots. 

• P ro duclivily prog ra m - Any program that 
produces a useable result. General term lar 
non-gamessortware. 

• Relational database - A database program 
that allows multiple different databases lo 
be opens d si mu Itan ea u si y w if h com it o r 
links defined between them so that data 
doesn't need to be duplicated whan entries 
are made. 

• Remote Terminal -A keyboard or dumb 
terminal which can access ihe resources of a 
computer processor a nd its storage . yel 
which Is not in the same physical location. 
When yoo pay your electric or phone bill 
they use remote terminals lo input your pay- 
ment information, and modify the central 
customer records database. 

• Scalable Font- Any mathematically 
defined loot that can be resized without a 
loss ill qualify. 



j1b , i<llttt l orat ion 



abc 



"1"H 



abc 



abc 



Loubla 



abc 



abc 



W'.;<.drupl* 



BoalftJs la 
font 



abc! 

Bit -mapped 
lone 



J agg lei 



tTypaSwith vil . HI - 3) 1^13 H^tog, Inc. 




# Spreadsheet - A program tor Ihe organisa- 
tion and processing of large columns of 
numbers. AM spreadsheets provide a variety 
of mathematical functions, and Ihe more 
powerful ones even offer built-in program- 
ming languages. 

• Structured graphic - A graphic which is 
stored as a mathematical definition rather 
than a bit-mapped image. These have the 



advantage of being rascalable with little or 
no loss of quality. 

• Teitformalllng -The process ol arranging 
kit tor display on the screen or on the 
printed page. 

• User-interlace - A generic lerm which 
encompasses a program's design and friend- 
liness as well as Ihe way that it responds to 
input Irom ihe user. 



ADDRESS BOOK 


Amor Limited 


Inn ova tronics 


Ell Lincoln Road 


Unit 11 


Peterborough, PE1 3 HA 


The Enterprise Center 


Tel: D733 58009 


Cran borne Road 


Fas 0733 67209 


Pollers Bar 




Herfordshire,EH63QQ 


Komparf UK Limited 


Tel: 0707 662851 


Guildford House 


Fax: 0707 £50902 


Guildford Road 




SI Albans 


Meridian Soli ware- Distribution Limited 


Hertfordshire. 


East House 


AL15JY 


East Road Industrial E slate 


Tel: 9727 866035 


London, 5W19 1AH 


Fai: 0727 8452D2 


Mitt mi 8Ui 




Fai: 0B1 543 2255 


Dlgila International Limited 




Black Horse House 


Softwood Products Europe 


Ejimrjiilii.EXaiJL 


New Sheet 


Tel: B395 270273 


Allralon 


Fai: 0395 268893 


Derbyshire, LTE55 7BP 




Tel: 0773 8367 61 


Europress Software 


Fax: 0773 631(140 


Eurnpa House 




AdlingtonPartt 


Tlmm martin 


Macclesfield, SKID *NP 


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78 



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CLASS 

PERIPHERALS 



NEW! - 50mhz A1200 

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FOR ALL AMIGAS 

inn, 

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genlock, from TCs 

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genlock features many sophisticated 

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ACCELERATOR . Die fifiMOEC grjtjo=Kii an A12W 
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ECS Sp*daafi is frm 
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hqh aspli/lkxi ?4.Ch| 
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20M 3000 or WOO beyond AGa! Bin Ida hardware 
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IrnsjfiFX lully Suppon ECS Spftdrbrri, bul also, 
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The HCfli is a high speed 
hard drive & RAM card 
which can also be used 1o 
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* High Speed DMA SCSI Controller Can 
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EMI 

£199 



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RAM UPGRADE CARDS 



GVP HCSt INCLUDES 6 SI VM SOCKETS FOR EAEV 
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1Mb SIMM £35 PER SIMM 
hi: vat - uru xq* 



FOR ALL AMIGAS 



-»_■ caplLii* sound Irom an external 

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I I "t (&SS6W) enaljlEs yon tn 

f,* n create auftio etftcts tor use 

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• Urn Stjlt High 1/spKt. Clnr PMy CattKniie. Ciw Q 

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mUOQflll&MIOl tTorrrirMDnJ 
r FREl Ssmptet Bist 



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FOR THE AMIGA 1200 



OPTIONAL 
6S8S2 FPU 



%' 



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Adding 
RAM or a hard 
to yojr Amiga 1 
will have a consider' 
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speed. The GVP SCSI. 1 
HAM gllrgws you to enhance your Amiga 
1200 with both. Its SCSi hard drive 
interlace is one of the fastest, wtiilsi its 
32-bii HAM upgrade Is based on Ihe 
same lacnnahigy f«a!ured in the best- 
selling M23Q. 

• Built-in, SCSI Hard Drive interface - 
Enables 2. 5 " SCSf Herd Drives to be 

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• Optional Sim, ot 32-bil RAM 

• Optional 688S2 Maths Co-procesaor 

SCSI /RAM BOARD 

HOW INCLUDES SC» KIT FREE OF CHAACE 



teRAM 



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impact ViBbn 14 * a tUh/ tealurad video 
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AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Games 




Family Trees 

You misfit be able to trace your f amity back several generations or be abie to go back even 
farther in time by as much as a couple of centuries. Trying to trace the lineage of a particular 
game genre is much, much harder though, but we thought we'd give it a shot anyway. 



COLOSSAL CAVE 

This is when it all started. Way hack in the dislani lime* of the early eighties, two university 
students came up with an idea lor a new kind of computer same. Que which you could read! like 
a hook, hut interact with, taking the pari: of a character in the story, influencing what went an 
around you. That game was called Colossal Cave, and every adventure game around loday. 
from Lore Ot The Temptrassto Legemft 01 Valour, owes sumelliing 1o thai simple piece dI 
genius. Obtuse and dated by today's standards, there are numerous PO vers ions oltlus name. It 
yon really wanl 10 see a little history. ■ 



Adventure Games 

H 



ave you ever wondered how a genre changes through lime? For 
example, how do we movs from one of ihe Infocom games to 
something like. Legends Of Vfltour? To see the answers to all these 
_ questions, read on. A quicK note: These family trees are not 
intended to be the complete history of games, merely guidelines to the 
paths games have taken over the years. Read on, arvd enjoy. 



INFOCOM 

Tent adventures were set to rule the neil live years of computer games, with names like Stall 
Adams and Mike Woodroffe making regular appearances in the computer game charts. 
However it's lilo.com that really brought adventure names to the Amiga market, with titles 
such as Zort. Ptaaetlatl anil Hitchhiker's Guide To the fafoiy, which incidentally was co-writ- 
ten with Douglas Adams himseil. Theyoroughl a slightly ro ore inlelligent parser, slacks ol 
locations and olher characters, plus more intriguing plots and fiendish puules, It was still all 
text at this (mini, though. ■ 



=f 



J 



LEVEL 9 

Tesn was still III e byword when Level 9 rail ed onto the scene, primarily in We It Spectrum aid 
Commodore M markels, but lliey also hruughl something new. Graphics. Again, the parsers had 
come along a fairway, nut Ihe inclusion ol hall-screen still graphics added a Utile lolhe games. 
How you ecu 14 see the world you were playing in, alheil in a very simple lorm. For the mnst part. 
Level 9"s early graphics consisted dI Utile more than a door, or a window, bul It was a start! 




MAGNETIC SCROLLS- - 

Probably the lasl □! the great Deri adventure writers. Magnetic Scrolls brought adventure games 

screaming and kicking onto the Amiga. Who can lorgstlhat first ever screenshot of TbvPamttU those 

years ago in C*V(P As le*l adventures go, Scrolls' games, ranging !r»m The Pawn. Guild 01 Thiem, 

Ihe superb Conoptlon, Fish and lastly Womieriahdmrt among the best ever written, Isalunng one ol 

the most intelligent parsers around (If youwerelolype 'I Think Therefore 1 Am', you'd be answered 

wllh 'Oh you do do you 7 '). The big thrill, Ihougb. were the gorgeous 32 colour graphics that scrolled 

down from the log of ihe screen whenever you entered a new location - the likes ol which had never 

been seen on a computer before. Recently, Mag nelic Scrolls released a hamper bundle el Fish, 

ComrpftOTand Wonderland using Ihe newlishf Magnetic Windows system, thai worked along similar 

lines lo a desiktop with dillerent windows showing differenl aspects olthe game. 



the beginnings of a winding 
country lane, whilst eastwards 
is a pear grove, Emily, your 
sister, is sitting here reading a 
book, T 

*yefflo readers^ 








■HBBHHBHBHBB8HB31 




Ik "to grandfather 
sK Open 14a 1 k 

11 Close Pick 

ve Read What 



5i 





Games 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



MANIAC MANSION 

Luc ash lm were another company that made the transrt an from text In graph- 
ics, on ly Ihey d i d i t tin m a dills re mt per spe tl ive . Aga i n , this, was another 
company that doubtlessly dldn'l realise that Ihey were creating s completely 
new genre. Wha1 they had treated was Ilia graphic adventure, using a point 
and click system to directly control characters and objects onscreen. Possibly 
the biggest ditlereice between Ihe design of litis and the design si advenlures 
that had come uelore il was (hat this didn't feature you as Ihe main character. 
Instead, you controlled someone else's Ills. 11 had beer done before, in (fames 
like Spellbound on the ZX Spectrum, hut Hi it was really ihe lirsl on 1ft-B.lt 
machines. 



_ 



,C= 



MONKEY ISLAND 

The graphic adventure weal through rela- 
tively HHIe change as time wore on. wilh 
bener graphics and more locations being 
added each time one appeared, il wasn't 
until The Secret Qt Monkey Mftni, though, 
that Ihe wo rid really sat back and we nt 
wow!'- Sumptuous graphics and more intri- 
cate puzzles than you'd find on the linal ol 
The Krypton Faetar. Monkey Island vtas a 
smash hit, and is jusl as popular today. 



ISHAR 

Silmarll's second greatest game. 

overshadowed only hy Marl, 
which is really more of Ihe same. 
Ishar combined Ihe simplistic con- 
trol ol Dungeon Master with the 
varien locations of The Sard's Tale 
and came out with one of the most 
attractive games to dais. Some 
stunning visuals, easily an a par 
with those seen in the Magnetic 
Scrolls games, tell yon with an 
adventure with much more atmo- 
sphere than most. Again. Ihis is 
riding that grey area between 
adventure and Role Playing Game. 



w 



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of damaqe. 

A Wjr-Hoi* swings at 
SAMSON, and hits for* 
7 point s of damage ■ 

BRIAN THE FIST 
chops at a Warrior, 
and hits for- 6 points 
•f damage-. 



Wai*i*iors 



*$* 



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LEGENDS OF VALOUR 

Surely one of Ihe greatest adventure 
games ever written, Legends Qt Valour 
linally gave you what so many adven- 
tures belc re had Inerj to • almost 
complete freedom W«th a basic sel af 
aims, yeu were Iree to run around the 
city ol MitlledoM. completing quests in 
any order, and even picking and choos- 
ing your tasks to some degree, Its most 
famous point ol interest has to be the 
graphics, though. Where other games of 
Ihis type gave you four-way movement, 
restricting your view ol the world la tour 
main compass points, Legends lets you 
walk anywhere and everywhere, thanks 
to its clever texture mapped polygon 
graphics. 



THE BARDS TALE 

Though notslrlctly an adventure game. The Bard's We series took the inter- 
face and realism that made Dungeon Maw such a hit and set il in a much 
larger location. Instead of running through miles and miles of similar lonking 
tunnels, you could now run through cities, underground passages and even a 
little of Ihe great outdoors- A simple, lent based interlace handled things like 
magic and conversation, while the non-linear approach to a lot of the game 
left il more like a Role Playing game than an adventure. Still. I had to include 
il, as il gives the logical progression t»., 






u ■ 
» 



\ 



* m rm*m 



LURE OF THE TEMPTRESS 

The latest and greatest in a long line of graphic adventures, lata Qt The 
Temptressvt% a large step forward forlhe genre in thai all Ihe characters in 
the game lead real lives. People get up in the morning, go to work, maybe 
shop at lunchtime, and titer tetlte lo the pub lor a few before going to bed- 
Theyalso interacl with each other, regardless ol anything you may he doing. 
Hot only does this lend a lot of scope for new types ol puzzles, it also gives a 
greater depth ol realism. A new direction for adventure games? 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 




Games 



Shoot 'Em Ups 



SPACE INVADERS 

It wrasn'1 the game iDat started the genre, but it sure was the lirst to stir public interest. Space Wars 
already had a small section ol ilie community moving small blots around, using Ihem Ihem to destroy 
aiher small blobs> but Span iavaiSersbhA everyone doing it- 1 don't really need to describe il In you. do 
I, other than to say that there are a million different clones to he found on PD, 




GALAXIANS/ ASTEROIDS 

Technology was improving, and so were game designs Captivated though me public 
were, il wasn I long before coin-op manufacturers decided ih at there just bad to be 
m ore to the ga mes worl rj 1 ha n s m i ng at lh e bottom of a scree n an d shooting upwards , 
se along came Marians and Astetolds. Both owed something to Span fovartas in that 
Ihey were bolh mnnochro malic shoot 'em tips trial were played on a static screen. 
However, Galaxians restored thefirsl 'proper' attack waves, and Asternitfs let you start 
moving a ship about In two dimensions, instead ol the rattier slaid one. 













Gold runner If o m Microti ea I is a la irly featureless and b land shoot 'em up by 
most people's standards. It features a small playing area, very tough levels 
and nut a huge amount nl payability. Il was, though, probably the first 
Amiga shool 'em up to make any headway. Playing like Urtdiutn turnest 
Ibrouoh ninety degrees, you had lo race at highspeed avoiding raised obsta- 
cles while blasting away large but predictable waves ot aliens. Like I said, 
nothing lancy. 



ames 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



XENON 

The Bitmap Brothers caused an enormous sHr with this one. All over lite world, magazines were 
procla I mm n Xenon to be Mike a ca in -op in you r home ' . Silky smooth sera I ling , aloe it a I ittl e 
slow, and some sultafalv metallic graphics gave il th-at arcade look, and some extremely long 
levels gave it enouglt nl a challenge to keep you playing. It at! looks ami tee Is daled now, sure, 
hut considering it was original it was quite an achievinent 




XENON 2 

One ol the highest rated games ever, aid still listed in most people's top ten games, 

XenonS haste he The Bitmap Braider's linesl ho jr. II looked good, played well and 
fealu red a sou ndtra c k wntte n by Bo-nb The Bass ma a Tim S imen on . A vertically 
scrolling nu lie K, the game pushed the Amiga games market lu/Hiar than any other 
had lo dale, and to most people's eyes (his has yet to be beaten. Perhaps a lithe slow 
in places, bul otherwise slill looks as good today as It did then! 



PROJECT X 

Team 17 came through with ttii current Amiga standard setter a little under two year ago which 
pulls together all the good polnls ol everything we've seen hereto Form one of the most 
playable games around. Smooth, last scrolling, very detailed sprites anil backdrops, more sound 
effects than are humanly possible la name and more levels than Ihe Coca Cola building in 
Hammersmith, PtojeetXit a game thai no soil respecting Amiga owner should be without. 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Games 




» 



Platforms 



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flrr rr?Trr:* r r 

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■ 



MONTY MOLE 

Cremlin s Monty Mais was one olthe 1lrst compjler game charade* to have any success. 
Al a market time when coln-ap conversions and 1ilm licenses were Hie. it was surprising lo 
see so many people returning to the same lace again and again. The Mole series of names 
were quite simple, but stood head, and shoulders above the JSWslyle games in thai you Iran 
a slight sdweniuring element to the game (you had Id bring items from one plate and drop 
them in another)- 



L 



-*** 



-*%** 



JET SET WILLY ■- 

Oflicially recognised as The Game Thai Slanted it All an computer. Games 
like Manic W/nej-and Doniay Xoit6 tame before It, but this was the first to 
really (lit the pub I ic , There wasn i much to do. it has to be sb i d , other than 
nun around roams, avoiding flying leet and chainsaws and hum along lo the 
theme tone. Incredibly simple in design, lite Spectrum owning audience 
faouuhl j| in drones, making programmer Matthew Smilh yery well off Into 
the bargain. An Amiga version was released a couple of years ago, hullhe 
less said about thai, the better. 



SHADOW OF THE BEAST 

Tss the logical progression Irom Monty Mole is Psygnosis epic Shadow 01 The Besst Coded 

by Newcastle- based Relletlions- a learn renowned far doing that little bil e*1ra wllti Amiga 
graphics -the game looked almosl unbelievably good, Countless layers of parallax sending, a 
subtle and lastetol palette and huge sp riles, made it one ol the besl selling games ever on Ihe 
Amiga Thai said, you wereslill only going from poinl A to point B, collecling somelhlng and 
talcing illo point C It spawned two sequels, neither of which really eiciledthe world like the 
first. Beast 3 was a step Inward graphic advenlufss, hut trials another stnry. 



UUUI t £-\ 



SUPER MARIO BROTHERS/SONIC THE HEDGEHOG 

Theyre aonsol e games , an d they a Iways wil I he . There are no plans lo re lease erthe r on the 
Amiga which seems to he a constant bone ol contention with Amiga owners, bul remember, 
without these two games, the platform games market would not be as heallhy as it is today! 
Super Mario Fitters leak the puzzle base* platform game, and improved it a hundred fold, 
whereas Some Toe Hedgehog look thinking out al the equ alien and trealed Ihe all action reac- 
tion lest. Yoo may curse the names and you might get particularly irtilated by Ihe moustache, 
but remember Ihis: consnles gave Ihe Amiga platform market a well needed kick up Ihe behind. 



t I I I I H 

I ( I I c 

I I 1 1 



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- 



d:d: 



- 



, 



ROBOCOD 

The sequel lo James Pond, Roboeodvtn probably Ihe lirst really successful attempt at a Mario 
style platform game (with the exception of Ihe GkbI Gianna Sisters, which was almosl an e*aet 
copy withdrawn 1rom the shelves almost immediately!). It had everything thai made Mario so 
popular- a cute charade r, ertremely varied and challenging levels and pots of secret rooms 
and puzzles. Al limes It could get a bil frustrating, hulturmosl ol Ihe time il had Ihe kind of 
payability that other games could only dream al. 




Games 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE ' 



0OO00100 



ADDAMS FAMILY 

If Robacod was an attempt at Super ttsrio Brothers. the Adrians Family 'was' Softer Marie Bros. 
Based on the film dI the TV series ol the daily comic strip, you controlled lather ol Ehefamllv 
Gomez in a daring raid throngli Ihi cooky Adtfartts house to rescue hislamily, kidnapped ay a 
bogus Uncle- Faster. From swinging spiked balls to bonuses in the most unlikely places, litis was a 
game you could play lime and time again, and now it's been released on a nudfjel label, anyone 
Who doesn't have it can rush out and gel it, 



SC 003V72 



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ZOOL 

As ftttbocod was to Mario. Zoo/ is to Soak. Ignoring the sometimes plodding pace of the standard 
platformer, speed is lite keyword lor Zool, Described incorrectly by many as an ant, Zool Is a space 
ninja which be proves by being one Dime most agile characters to hit Ihe market, What he loses In 
charm, be makes up for by being able lo leap. spin, kick, punch and fly all around the maze-like 
levels, fighting violins and turnips alike. The speed had the tendency Id make Ihe game a little 
unplayable in places, bul as a relle* tester it has yel to he beaten. 






H 



HARLEQUIN L 

Across between a graphic adventure and a platform game. Harlequin is possibly 
one ol the ntosl attractive names to ever hll the Amiga. Beautifully presented 
and designed, it tells Ihe rather surreal story ol a clown returned to his home to 
find it devoid of smiles. As he sels oil to pot things right, he has lo climb mon- 
strous clock towers, mess about in an askew Egyptian pyramid and generally 
swing about in all manner of weird locations. It needs a little more thought than 
your average platform game, but If there's one thing you could never call 
Harlequin, it's average. 



*s 



4> 



JEna* 



FLASHBACK 

The sequel to Ihe coll graphic adventure Anotitet World, Flashback Is a platform game lhai 
shouldn't he played as a platform game, The furthest extension ol the Monty Male genre ol plat- 
formers, Flashback features the most realistic charade r animation ever. Using a system called 
Foloseapmg. Ihe main character was created by filming an actor going through the moves, digi- 
tising him, and then trimming the image to lit. The end result Is some ol the most fluid 
animation ever. 




*ii 




K^, HT $ '1 






E3 




JIMJrV WHITES 

15.99 



BATTLE OF BRITAIN 

11,49 



ULTIMA J 

9.49 



SLEEPWALKER 

12.99 



ID GOLF 

12.99 



Fl GRAND PR IX 

15,49 



KAIQMTS OF THE SKY 

12.99 



POP* SIM CITY 

17.49 



HeWXWiST , EC 

8.99 



THUNDEHIHAWK. 

10.99 



ADO* MB i- AMI.' 

9.99 




FiHST SAHNEAALO 

13,99 



PROJECT K 

10,49 



LEMMINGS 

12.49 



POWER UP 

14,49 



RAILROAD TYCOOH 

14.49 



ELITE 

14.99 



S OF MflNKEy ISLAND 

12.99 



IOOL 

10,49 



LOTUS TURBO J 

9.99 



LOTUS 3 

10.49 



PRINCE OF PERSIA 

7.99 




PINBALL DREAMS 

13.49 



ASSASSIN REMIX 

9.99 



LEMMINGS 2 

14.49 



HOOK 

11.49 



SILENT SERVICE 2 

14.49 



B17F.YINGP0RT 

14.99 



GRAHAM "AYLCH3 

11,49 



SPACE CRUSADE+OD 

14.49 



PHEMIERHGR 

10.49 



NIGEL MANSELL 

15.99 



IMPOWTMHT - ntASS MOTS 
NOf = -WW Ml w*A 01* AiQQ 
Ptm HQO or H2W 
HOU* will network on tr* 

tmo. 

1 MtG - reijufrcs of trait J Mflf 
of 1AM re run, 
* : WCW Htm 

•M ATTIC* 4.U0. 1NOI2) -1MI 

a train u MEGI i!99 

A-TFlAIN COWtTNUCnOHHTft 4*0)13.10 

AJSO AIRBUS ;i U£Ci;HQP| 1835 

ASK AIHBUB , U5A VERSION) ll MEG; 12 45 

ADDaMSFaUiiYhMEQ) 9,99 

ADVANTAGE TENNIS (N01Z| 17.49 

4Jft FORCE COMMANDER (1 MEG)'!. '1. 1111 

AIR SUPPORT 17.49 

AIR. LAMP l*E* 

IS9B ATTACK BUI, INDYSOO, 

PlBWTEHCIRlYJPlllNOlJl »40 

AIRBUCKS 1.Z..A1200VEHSIONL 19.41 

ALFRED CMC«EN-;i MlGl- ... 1MI 

ALFRED Cl*J«jEN1A1 2*0 VERSION!, 17.9* 
ALIEN 3 11.B9 

iliek tmo i vtcik lament n mm no 

ALlEn BREEG2 |l HEG|- 17.4B 

ALIEX BFIEED! |AIZ»VtRtKng- .. 11 B0 

AUBEASTAR 19.41 

AMERICAN GLADIATORS- 17.BB 

M«*t 4.49 

ANOTHER WORLD 12.4B 

AAACHC, 7.00 

APtDYA 1.11 

APOCA..YPSEI 1 MEGI 30. 4B 

A4UATK GAMH , 1741 

ARABIAN NIGHT* - 19.41 

ARCHEH MACLEAN* POOL IB <B 

ABlU«0»l T.Bt 

ASSASSIN.; I KEG I I3.4B 

ASSASSIN REM|» . l.H 

AY9B HAHRtiR ASSAULT- - 32. « 

»ATJ 33.49 

B17 FLYING FORTRESS 41 VCG) 14. BB 

UAT VI TMt W0*tD ...H.BB 

lATMAh HETUHNB I7.BB 

14TMAH TJ4E M0»* , , 7 BB 

lATTLilSLE - 1S.BB 

BATTLEBLE Bl .....II.1P 

►ATTLI OF BRITAIN ...11.40 

BEACH VOLLEY (NO I Z| 7.BB 

KtHRAlH THE 1TEEL 9KV(1 U£Q.,...H.H 

BENEFACTOR (1 MEG), 20.4B 

m.Lt TOMA10 DiMl ■■ 17-41 

BLACK CRYPT |1 MEGI ..._ IB.4B 

• LADE Of DESTINY (1 WC 0) M.iO 

i.astar.i utc: j.4S 

BLOB |l IIEQ|> - 14. 4B 

BLUES BROTMEHS. . . „7.il 

SOB'S SAC OAV. IT.H 

BODV1LOWSI' MIGI I1.B0 

BODY BLOWS |Al 200 VERSI044) 1MB 

BODY BLOWS GAUCT1C..T MED) ■> ...I7.4B 

boot news SALieric ii' ho *i»*ewi ■ noo 

BOSTON BOMB CLUB IHOl2j 0.99 

BOArpG NlAAAGEH IN01ZI B.4B 

wiiv --t IW., . 17.00 

BUBBA W BT1H _ 14.4B 

BUHMBKS RUBBER IT.H 

BUftfc-tO W1BBER |Al»0VEN3IOh|, 11.49 

CADAVER ONO I Z| 1 45 

CAESAR 11 UEQ) (NOl 1\ 11.4B 

CAESER DELUXE .. 1B.4B 

: ,iL>'>i;;nr mk'„| H.4B 

CAWFAIDNBM WED.)* 11 55 

CAhuWPOCMRfl «EQ|. ».H 

CAPTIVE 1 ■ . B ERATIOJi I" MEO[ 2H.4B 

CARDIACS' ..... B.4B 

CASTLfS*(*ia«H(-ERSiOtd| B.4B 

CELTE LEGENDS 1B.4B 

CirAupirjnsHip luijiiirrn ut (ii >i *u 

rmAidPIOHSHlP UANAOEII U 

UPDATE DISK I-. Hl^l ■ . I.4B 

;tuLUhxs,Hi» manaqer rim n MEa.u w 

CHAOBENOIWE IT.rB 

DBUetHKHNI Ai-'a: ■.mMH"' ■ » «a 

CHUCK HOCK ]- 1 1 MEQ|. ... IB.tB 

C4VIUEATION 1 1 HEOI Z3.4B 

CIVILISATION |A1 100 VER3JOM) • IS.Bt 

COME AT A R PATHOL M.tB 

wmt- : ,*n.-iii-ii 

(F1 S STRIKE EAGLE 1, bSi ATTACK 5UB, 

TEAM TAWltJH M*J6)(N0iat .IB.BB 

«JCIL HPOT * Z0.« 

COOL WORLD I ' MBGh "Bt 

CORRuPTWN .jLVSCROLLB; T.4B 

CHAZfCAHS-1 14 15 

C«tiE»ERf ...„..,... „t|J| 

CRUI&E FDR A CORPSE 11 » 

CRVBTAL KHODOM DIIZV I l.-tt 



CURSE OF ENCHANT1A |l KtOI .. ... 1]4» 

CTflLERPUNK, .... „ „ 14.4S 

CVBEFlSPACEH WEOl- Ii IS 

D-OEHERAT10N ,,,.,,„,,,,,.,,. .,,-,.-1J.4» 

DARKUEHEJ1 UEO) 17U 

DARKSEEDll UlU; ,„ .„ .IHI 

DfHHR) |Al HC VEflSION) • 14 41 

DENHE* .....1148 

ni si in !;-n <t |i hEC.i i. j'j 

DISPOSABLE HERO' ItM 

D1HV PWHCE TOLKFOLU Ft* 

DlWV* f ACCLLtNT ADWHTIHIE 14,49 

DOGFIOHTC HEG|> ZIM 

DONKl'IMei- 1»49 

DOODLEBUG 1+49 

DRACULAM MEGl- -.__._,..„. »4B 

DnlA^LAJtOf 

ITHAASAHTEA, BTOHM MASTER 

l5MAO)(l M€G)- . 1*** 

DFllAWHtJ |l HEOlh .»» 

DUNE n IdEB) 1-B4B 

DJhrE Z - ■•TTU 401* AAHAH4 11 UEG).»4+ 

DUNCEDN MASTER & 

CHADS STRIKES BACK (I MCOh ■■ ... 14 H 

Mr',,-, ii.*f:itns 1MB 

eltte i+m 

ELITE SHRONTIIRl a.« 

EPIC |l MEG| ItH 

EUROPEAN CNAUPlCnJll Ui(J.J U»* 

E II OF THE BEHOLDER I 57,11 1 1 HEG'I 1 3 H 

EVE OF THE BEMOLDERZHMEOJ ? I -IM 

Fl IDyuAHH;.il Mil; ■ l,"i'i 

Fll. 'A STEALTH FIGHTER 2.0; I BEGHZi.'JS 

FISETPjDtE EAGLE Z y' MHJf 1140 

Fl t CHALLEHQE 1« 41 

F I B STEALTH F1GHTEB (MOFI 1 1 4B 

lAUHStFldNM- 

LEOEND OF KTRAArOA IhOUHI "EGliUS 

FAOt OFF CI "OeKEf IMQ13) »49 

FANTASTIC WORLDS 

IREALM5. P 5 a-ES. MCBA LO MAFIlA. 

POPUlOV* nahLlEnLAKDll1lllEQ|';<IO'l;.rj4a 

FIRE t ICE 17.M 

RRST S«IILri»l > MI'S* L« H W |P»1J| 1)04 

flames of freedom ;mid*inter si mas 

FLAEIHBACK.'I UEG'I Z4BB 

FOOTBALLER OF THE YEAR 2 4ND1 i| .. 4.49 
FORMULA 1 D.RANDPPVA 14.4B 

FgfgnIiii*Rt(N0iji 1449 

Dill MEG| • 17.M 

BAUNTUTS TJ( 

GAUNTLET 3 INCH 3$ 14.4S 

GEARWOBKS* , 1HB 

0HD1B.9 N 1 0HOST3 7.M 

GLOBCHJLE ■ Z0.4B 

00*4. , JH49 

QCHUBtS Z 1449 

GCK.F WORLD Cl*** LEADEMOAilD *im 
ORAHAM GOOCiH WORLD 

GLASS CRICHilTd WO) , 11,49 

ORAHAM DOOCH DATA DUK > 119J 

GRAHAM TATlOR't 

SOCCER MANAOER ;1 UEQ,. .11.41 

GRAND PR K CIRCUIT ' -B.4B 

□ UNSHIP ZD»(1 MlO| ... ,Z>a 

HARLEOUIKI 17.4B 

HEAD OVEH HEELS ..,,.,,. TH 

HNMUAL. i- UHinMOHS IJL44J 

HEHODUE5T , DATA (MSK <NOIl| .. .. 4S5 
HEROOUEST 1 - 

THFlEOACV G4=S0RASIL|lM£O| ...17.4B 
HILL STREET BLUES iUOIZI ... ... „ .. 14B 

wont auto (i mesi u49 

HtSTORVLlhE 1B14-1S.lt MEG; Z2H 

HDULTWCKIO COLLECTION 
IfiOftOCOP.SHOSTBUSTEHS i HffltU 
JONES ACTIO*, BATMAN THE WOWI CUT, 

|N0*» »« 

HDOK 11 4B 

humaks zii may a*i 

HUUUUrS DATA DISK (W01ZJ 1*411 

HU«TER<N01ZI 7M 



.7« 



IK. 

IMMORTAL INP'Zf 1M0 

UJIIIAMA JOKES 1 ACTION 

4FATE OF ATLANTIS.I ...... 17.W 

IMDIAMAJCHIACTIOW i» 

INLKAUA JOT.E& ADVENTURE 1 1.4B 

IhDIAhA .ONES FATE 01 

AFIANTI9 A&V (1 UEQ) ±4.49 

INNOCENT ; I MED I ' J9.H 

IMTUHlATlONAL RUC1VCMALLEJW1E 14.09 
IkTEflMATONAL SPOUTS 

CHALLENGE I'NCIIZI HW 

itHAFl 3 ■ LC fllCm* OF CHAiJf 1 1 UEG|1 9 M 
ISHAfl ' ■ LE jIC*S OF CHADS 

;4 I HM VEPSA1M ■ 1100 

IT C'AUE FROM THE DESERT PLUS 

AWT HEADS DATA UI5*. I ' hk:| u ml 

JACK MCKLAUS DOlF 6 49 

JAGUAR KJ.ZZermr.01- ,11.10 

,*ME3P0NO - 1.4B 

.jAMESPOND Z-HOBOCOD hit 

j«MT VrHITB 9W}0*ER 15.M 

J4NXTER {M/SCHOLLE) 4.4B 

JOHNMAJKlENSllfli-I'lilO'lAU. IT,B« 

JUIHitJCBAnK^ M* a l "■» 



JURASSIC PAfl It (AlMOvERSlONl ...11+4 

K!«l iUTDPIA 1\ |1 MEG I 1 1.4* 

KG* ,30.44 

KICK OFF 1 II MEGh IHQ1S - .1+4 

KINGOOMS OF GERMANY ,;i ut is;. ■ 1 u « 

KIMOfi QUEST 1 10.44 

KITVIC+OUS- ltM 

KNIGhTHARE 1S+4 

KNK3HTS OF THE SWT n ME-51 1 Z.44 

KHUSTlfSS4iet*»V*l"OU9t 1044 

LASTNINJAIfH01I| T.4* 

LEGEND {WORLD OF LEGEND^ 1144 

I I III NIJH IKM SALlf.l ;i MHOi ,lfl*» 

LEGENDS OF YAiDUR ! I MEG) Z3+4 

LEISURE &UHT lARRT I |l M«GJ- 1ZT» 

imiitf.f; 1t+4 

LEMHNGS! 14+9 

LlMMNGSPArAOIiK-QHWO' .(,« 

LINKS ■ THE C h AlLE S'LE OF 

GOLF n MEG| ■ IZ.» 

IJOOWtART 1T.44 

LOMfl,ARDHACRALLV .TJ» 

LOHDOF THE RINGS l r <S 

LOAD OF THE RUMSSi- 

TWO TOWERS (1 MEG! ZO+4 

LOSTVIKIhOS 10.44 

LOTUS 3 THE FINAL CHALLENGE 1 1 HEGj 

INOlIj . ., 10+* 

LOTUS TuBBO CHALLENGE 2 (HD1iJ ...1.44 
LURE DF THE TEMPTRESS II Mtttl «>*-, 
Ml TANK PLATOON nMEOf 11+4 

magic Bar* _ ir.44 

MAGIC WORLDS 

ISTORV MASTER. DRAGONS BREATH, 

CHYSTALSC^ARBOREAjiNOIZI . .IE4? 

MARlTlAMS CASTLE ;i MEGi, 20+4 

MAN UTD PHEMIER LEAGUE 

.MIAMI .;N-I|- MH;.|. . ,1141 

MANCHESTER UMTED ,1+S 

MANIAC MANSION INOIZ),.. .. . .!#*» 

MICRO UACJ"«S- 16*9 

MICROPROS*: 3D GOLF 11 MED) IZ.4B 

MK3aS.;iMtGi HX44> 

MONOPOLV 1»+« 

MORTAL KOMBAT(l MEG)- »M 

MR«UTIlAli«0VEJt9ICIM), 14l+» 

NE'# ZEALAND STOHfrNOHl 7« 

NICK FALDO-* MlP ii +4 

NICKY BOOM 1 _ !«.» 

NKJELUAHSeiLSlA'ail.O 

CrAMP'SHIP |1 MEG.) 1S.4» 

NIGEL MA«EELLS -WO«<.D CHAMP SMP 

lAlifKl DEBSICK*! 11.44 

NIPROh SAFES 1 1 MEGI Zfl.4» 

NO SECOND PRIZE 1«L4» 

ONE STEP BEYOND |l MEGI I+49 

OPER4-K3N Sll-.il '»|-MIII7| 11 it 
OPERATION WOLF |N012) .TJ» 

o/tmotm ri Mto) i«4v 

PAMQ - ,7J» 

FAIHA "Cr.»0*UM&r>«JIZ| *» 

RATRICAA (1 MED) 20+S 

PERFECT GENERAL ,ZZ» 

HRFICT BfNIRU OATA MX 1*+* 

PERIHELION |l MEG| • »+4 

PGA TOUR GOLF- COURSES 11.49 

flif. lCtlfirtOLF COURSE DISK 1144 

P-VEA-. DREAMS. :1 MED) I3+S- 

PWBALL FANTASlIt tOLM 

HBATESjNtWt _._ 10+4 

PTTFIDHTIR 7.114 

PI AYl-H MANAGER, NQUl 0+1 

POOLS OF DAHK.HE&S 1.4* 

POPULOUS I PROMISED LAUDS- INUI Zi I n Vr 

POPULOUS tSIMCJTV 1T+* 

POPULOUS J II MEGI' 

CNAUmtit DUfAtKilt 22+4 

POPULOUS 2 CHALLEHQE 

DATACHSKriMCG). ._.tM* 

POWEHUP 

IGHA5EH S.TURHCAH H5AII. 

ALTERED BEAST. RAISBOW I5LAND&H4 49 

PREMIE" MANAULR 1 1 MEGI 104* 

PREMIER MANAGER !<1 MEO) 16+4 

PREMIERE |l MEG| IZ+9 

PRUt HOUCR 1lJj* 

PP^iCE OF PERSIA II MEG| 7.44 

PRO TENUIS TOUR 3 I?<S 

PROJECT K |S*ECI*L E21TIONI ;i MEG) 10+4 
PUGQSrriMED), ZO+4 

FUIRCVIRO MI« iT.4» 

PUTTY I5 4S 

QUEST I GLORY 
IBlOQQWYCH, MIDWINTER, 

CADA'iER, BAIT. («01i) 1i+B 

UUES1RUN Z<SSi;.|M6133 MM 

GWAK- S*9 

HTVPE INOIfl ~._7JM 

RAILflGAGTVCCO L .n MECi ..._ 14-J'l 

RAINBOW COLLECTION 

{BUBBLE BOBBLE, BAl"«BOW ISLANDS 

NEW ZEALAND STOHTKNOPI in 

rally 41 m<n- «L+S 

RAYING MAD 

IMEGA IWINS. jAMt**0lH«.3 . 

RDBOCOD, RODLAND; 11.49 

REACH FOR THE SKIES ».41 



RICK DANGEROUS |NO!Z> .T.H 

ROAD RASH IT.H 

AOhhnQOD LEGEND QUEST 7.9* 

lOBOTCr-AEGlA'ZH) VERSION) IT.B1 

ROBQCO* t 7.9* 

ROSOCGP 3<N01Z| 13.01 

H<1L LIN6 RtMJKY IHOIJ) 0.4* 

ROUE |l MEG| .._ _ 13.9* 

HOPK.E3 DR0TT ■ (.»* 

RULES GF ENGAGEMENT 2 , 21.4* 

RTDEP CUP |A I ZOO VERSION)- ll.W 

RYDER CUP- 10.41 

SABRE "EAM - I 1.99 

SABHE -EAMiAIZX'VEBSIOrt)- TB«1 

SCRABBLE (US GOLD) 1B.4* 

SECOND SAMURAI; I MEGI' ZB.4* 

HCIJT Of HCINKEV ISiAADi'l MEOM2.9* 
SECRET OF DONKEY ISLANDS ;1 MEG) 3+.« 
SENSIBLE SOCCER I 'SIB* SE ASO"l I ] •! 
,,lllli4',:i -11 HH.SI ,■ K TH T-SHIRT! 9.40 

SHADOW OF THE BEAST 3 19.1* 

SHADOWLANDS- 0.4* 

-iiuuuwi nil .:'■: mil ' 1 B.n 

SHOOT EM JP CaNSTRUCTKN KIT |ND' Z.i B.9S 

SHUTTLE T M(G| l',** 

SILENT SERVICE 1<1 UEGXNOfl 14.4* 

SIM CITY DELUDE 

.SIM CITY FUTURE CITIES 1 TERRAIN 

ELHTOAt) ZZ.B1 

•IIM . Ill- 1 A13MI Y FRinjhl 22.1* 

SIMON THE SOHCEHER.: 1 MEG) 22.41 

SI0HN THE SORCERER I A'lJlHJ Vt*llON| SS.il 

SLEiCWAlKER 12.1* 

SMASH TV T.B1 

IDCCIRKID „. 10.00 

SOCCER KID CA12M VEHSIDN! - 11.1* 

501FP TREKfTHEIEARCH F0PI»TOe«)-lH0 
SPACE GRUBADC ♦ OATA DISK (N012H+ 41 

SPOCEHULK ZB>» 

SPlArTQF FKCALlBUR |! UEG| |HC*f. .il.iH 
SPORTS MASTERS 

I PGP. GOLF. "1DV K». A0YA»ft*Cll TlHtllt, 
EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP'S l9fflj 

II MEG! lM01i) 30.4* 

STAR TREK ■ J Jl N A HU V W IAWY 

(41100 YER5UONI S2.4* 

STARBLAOE iNOIZI ,1.0* 

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AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Games 



SUPER STAR 




Superstars 

It's such a small word, but it makes all the difference. The computer equivalent of an Oscar, a CU 
Superstar shows that a game has made the grade, that it is ground-breaking in one way or another 
and that it will he regarded as a classic for many years to come. Or does it? On these pages, we 
look hack at some of the games that have reached the ultimate pinnacle, and see how they com- 
pare with today's high standards. Surprisingly enough, most of them get to keep their accolade, 
with a few slipping down to mere screenstars. Who says we ever got things wrong? 




IT CAM! FROM THE DESERT - Cinemaware 

REVIEWED: JANUARY 90, 96% 

'It (joes without saying thai it Cams From lite Desert is evtraordinarily no listed. The sections 
all mterluck Ituently. whilst Hie graphics, as ever, are excellent. AH (lie townsfolk you come 
into contact with appear as large animated stills, whilst the Imcations ire authentically put 
together. The sound adds lo this, wit a suitably eerie tune tor much of the lime which changes 
as you visit other locations. lor example you're treated lo country rock at the uaranolhe radio 
slatian. and hoe down violins al the various farmsteads dotted a boot the map. it Came From 
The Desert is Cinemaware's most: complete game fal' Mike Patlentiwt 

'Cinemaware was an ambilious idea al the best or times, as Mirrorsoft too* the then enor- 
mous 5UDk the Amiga had lo offer and sot about creating games that were cinematic lo watch, 
it not to actually play. There were a whole variety of games created under the label , lrom 
sports games lo semi-adventure games like this and Rocket Ranger. This was, though, without 
a dDubtthe besi ol the entire series. As the 1 hie suggests, the game Is based around a 8-movie 
style invasion of a small desert town, where giant ants are running amok. You play the suitably 
rugged hero out to the rid the lown of Hie infestation, with the odd romantic encounter thrown 
in tor good measure. 

In Ihese enlightened days, ol course, it is nowhere near as impressive as il first was. As 
large, rendered photorealistic images become the norm, and strategy games pass through 
Civilisation ant beyond, il just doesn't took or play as it once seemed to. 
Lacking in depth, il all comes across as a lirile superficial. Fun to play, but 
dated now. 



ROTOX - US Gold 

REVIEWED: JUNE 90, 97% 

'Too many shoot 'em ups are patronising rehashes -but this one's just a bloody good original. 
It's a bit disorientating at Inst, hut the gameplay and the aim of the game are so simple that 
ynu'll soon gel used to il while cramming Ihe swear hoi with ten pees when, fjrlhe third lime 
in a raw, you mistime thai all-important jump and sand your cyborg careering Into space. All in 
all, ftotexn a delight. Remarkable and inspired. A quick straw poll around the otliceconlirms 
that here al CUwe think that this one's, a winner. II II last three times as long as the Hundred 
Years War.' Steve James 

There are really two dilterenl ways lo describe ttotox. One is as a super blaster. The other 
is as a b og -sta ilda r d S hoot ' em u p with a gim michy backdrop. However you look at it, it sure 
had a lot ol originality, You controlled a tune spaceman, armed with a small hand cannon, 
against hordes ol alien creatures that looked very similar lo flies. In thai department, every- 
thing was fairly standard. 

What really set 1tie game apart was the unique rotating graphic system. The entire screen 
rotated around the player, including the backdrop, and a comtii nation of a matrix to hold Ihe 
sprites and an interactive polygon backdrop made Ihe whole thing convincing. It was playable, 
and very challenging, yet lacked the speed to make il a sure lire hit. Bui when It should have 
been shitting at the speed ol Bob's Bad Bay, it crawled along, and that spelled the /^flh 
whole thing . N ow , ol course . il all looks a little pri m itive. tmEZ 







Games 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



S 






^ ♦ ^*J 



LEMMINGS - Prognosis 

REVIEWED: FEBRUARY^, 94% 

-Lemming* is the perfect family game, The dilficnlty levels mean that it's playable by all ages, 
and once yoo've grasped the gameplayyou 63" play ils-lraigjlit away. The only problem I came 
across was trying to select a particular lemming in a crowd of around a hundred - faul chaos Is 
halt lite fun with lemmings, ft truly excellent gamE.' Mark Patterson 

Is there anylnlng thai can really he said about lemmings thai hasn'l In sen said a million 
time-s belore? It's been on every single computer lormal Ever, and has sold more copies than 
nearly a Drilling else, ft simplE but extremely eHBcfive strategy game, yc« leads small group al 
Lemmings Irom one side al a landscape fraught wilh danger lo the olher, hoperutly keeping 
Enough of them alive lo let you move lo Ihe ne*t. lar more inlricale and Irgglrating level. 

After an add-on diss (Oti ltg> Mors lemmings) and Ihe i ma gin alive ly UHed Lemminns 2. 
Ibis slill looks as playable and addictive today as il ever did. Complaints ol it being loo dill i- 
cult, or the graphics being loo small jusl got pished aside hi III stampede, Full ol character 
and extremely entertaining la play it just can't be faulted. One of lite best games ever released. 




SPEEDBALL 2 - Image Works 

REVIEWED: FEBRUARY 91, 95% 

Summing up SpeedttaH 11 is analmosl impossible task. II retains Ihe basic gamep lay of Ihe orig- 
inal, but expands on praclically every pari ol it. The new, enlarged pilch mates lor a 'aslEr game 
which Involves more passing and dodging skills, and the new pilch-side leatures add even more 
variety- as does Ihe improved violence! In fad, there is absolutely nothing to tau II in Speedbatl 
It, the people invoked have produced a sequel which lar exceeds any ol my high expectation 
and. In the process, have created a game which is without a doubl a classic' Sieve Merrett 

II you should ask any Amiga owner to name really goad iwo -player games, the chances 
are Ihey will name Speedbatl 2 at one of them. The Bitmaps on full force, Speedball was 
celebration ol skill , speed, violence and all things metallic looking. Similar lo Rugby, out 
played in an enclosed arena, Speeiltiall gave yau Ihe chance to heat up your mates and then 
humiliate them wilh some outrageous scoring. Not surprisingly, il was a huge hit both in the 
office and out there '. 

However, like manylwn player games, il sutlered badly it you were sitting at home on your 
own. Although still exciting, anyone who has ever played Kick Oft when sat alone will know how 
much al Ihe attraction disappears when yon slart playing against the machine. Effortless pass- 
ing, superbly controlled sel pieces and all kinds of stunts and tricks that you would love to be 
able lo do are performed effortlessly ogainsl you. Put il against Sensible Soccet or Kick Oil 2, 
and Speetlball ioo\a a little dated. Perhaps it's time Ihe Bitmap Braiders gol their heads 
together and came up wilh Speedbatl 3, then we'd delinitely get no work done 
around Ihe allice. 



HEAD OVER HEELS - Ocean 

REVIEWED: SEPTEMBER 91 , 94% 

'With its many tricks and traps, Head Over Heels can guile easily claim lobe the best arcade 
adventure the Amiga has ever seen. In releasing Head Orerflee/s after all (his time, and on 
budget, Ocean have taken a worthwhile risk which they have pulled oil perfectly. Head Over 
Heels is a musl far every Amino owner, and could hopefully pave Ihe way for some ol Ihe bel- 
ter past licenses and original products la eventually make it on to the Amiga. Steve Merretl 

When Imagine Software invented the Filmalidrt game system, I bet Ihey had no idea how 
many sp i n alts we re going lo a pp ea r . Inle reslingly enou gh , after Imag I ne col I apsed , Qee an 
took up the reins, and went onto create a lair lew brilliant isometric puzzle games. Batman 
and Head Over Heels were easily the best, and Head Over Heels ported brilliantly to Ihe 
Amiga. OK, so it doesn't look much tike an Amiga game, as the original graphics were 
copied over and retouched a little , bui that's half Ihe charm. 

This game isn't about graphics. Lei Monkey island 2 torn all the lancy looks, and leave 
Ihe solid gameplay to Head and Heels, a dag that has been split in two and dumped in a 
man -like series of rooms and puzzles. Each has dillerenl qualities, and success in Ihe game 
depends on your ability to use Ihe pair together. A real throwback to Ihe days when all that 
really mattered in a game was Ihe way il played, and Head Over Heels plays brilliantly, 
Although a little basic at first glance, you soon become caught up in one of the best games 
ever. You can slill get it on ils orl gin at budg el I abel , and you are well advised lo II you 
haven't already. _^yy^. 




F- 1 9 - Microprose 

REVIEWED: SEPTEMBER 9D, 94% 

"The graphics are among the best I have seen an any Amiga II ighlsim. They're smoo 
well drawn. Another inte resting point is thai objects slowly come into view unlike other flight slms 
where mountains spring out of nowhere, It's also nice to see enemy planes and i nstall alions on 
your camera display, instead at dots In the distance. F-19 is taxing, though it's surprisingly easy 
la get in grips with the controls. This Is an excellent sim lar Ihe novice, but expert pilots shouldn't 
be pul oK either. II Ihe game > set on a high difficulty level you need to use every trick in the booh 
and push Ihe F19 lo its limit A truly excellent simulation.' Mark Patterson 

A good High) sim will never age. and Ihis is a brilliant flight simulation, made even belter 
by Ihe lasfer processor in the At 200. It might look a little basic nexl lo sims like TAT and 
Guttshtp 2000, but it's still realistic, challenging and playable three years dawn the line. Like 
many ol Microp rose's simulations, ils mission based, with the player needing to compte ran- 
dom sets ol tasks to rise through Ihe military ranks. 

What was interesting about this one was Ihe fact thai It was based an an apparently 
non-existeol plane Rumours were rile concerning the top secret stealth lighter (later 
named as the F-117A|. so Microprose stepped toward wilh their prediction The sleallh 
design of the erafl meanl considerably dilferent flying tactics lo Ihe standard ^^^ 
combat sims circulating at Ihe time, and it's that difference that sels if yll*fa 
apart horn many, even now. \^^i 




» 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Games 



i i 




MIDWINTER - Microprose 

REVIEWED: MAY 90, 96% 

'Midwinter is In a tlass of its own when it comes la platting. The two-hundred page manual 
leatores lasclnating insights into the world in which we live, and il tits a fantastic background 
story which sels the scene lor the host of believahle characters who make up the Midwinter 
peace larce Although we're only a Mini of the way Info il, Midwinter m the Amiga has pi to 
be a contender 1 or gam b ol Ihe yea r. It has averrlri Ing you want. So much effort and research 
has gone into making Midwinter spwVlt. You'd be mad to miss it." Mark Pattern 

Mike Singleton has been responsible lor more than a few revolutions In the nasi, even back 
in the days ol the It Spectrum when he created Lords OfMidninM, a game wilh millions al dll- 
lerent locations. When Midwinter wit released, Ihe entire gaming world held Iheir breath. 
which is undersla noable even now. A com plele island complex housed an enormou s slrale gy 
game unlike anything thai ever came before II and still eclipses a lot ol garnet. Take a tablalop 
wargame, add some Iracta I fy generated polygon landscapes and putyoursell right in Ihe mid- 
dle nl It. 

Ertremely daunting al Hist, wilh 3 2Qfl plus page manual and more local ions ana charac- 
ters than were necessary, the game sold mora than a lew Amigas and caused more sleepless 
nights lhan anything since. " spawned Iwo sequels, noilher ol which seemed lo relive the 
majesty of the original, hut what an original! lis still available on budget, so if you 
want something so cha 1 1 engine, it' II make your drain explode , the n you ca if I do . . - , 
much better Ifiao this. 



SENSIBLE SOCCER vl.l 

REVIEWED: DECEMBER 92, 94% 

' I really cannot pra ise this update highly enough . S I mp ly by enticed I ng lhal Ihe on gin al wasn't 
ported and actually doing something about It hath Renegade and Sensible have scored well on 
my caring people' scale. However, whereas past enhanced versions of games [Adenoid, 
Xenon, et al) have been minor fe mines ol old favourites, ihe additions made here are genuinely 
lothe game's benelil, If yon are oue of the sad individuals who didn't buy tawtoff Sower lirst 
lime round, then do so now - they don't come any better than this.' Sreira MerrelT 

To recap, lor those who need il, Sensible Soccer is Sensible Software's answer lo Kick 
0tS2. Shamelessly, Jon Hare and en freely admit lhal Ihey were heavily inlluencad whan 
designing this game, which goes a long way Id eiplain why there are sn many similarities 
between this and Dino rjlni's ellorl, such as Ihe small graphics, Ihe scanner, the complex 
control system and most of Ihe rest al the flame actually. version 1.1 was lor Ihe most 
pan a case of liny tweaks and improvements, with some slightly better intermediate 
screens and what have you. 

Two areas that were greatly improved were the referee intelligence and the goal- 
keeper control. The ref was watching mosl ol the lima now. dishing oul cards a -plenty. 
while Ihe computer controlled goalie were almost unbeatable. However, as they did 
behave 'Intelligently', il was still possible to fool them, sending them the wrong way as 
you waltzed inlo Ihe goal. j*ejk. 

It's still as playable now, and hasyelto be beaten really, so the mark QY^fc 

I stands. ^^jpj 




STRIKER - Rage 

REVIEWED: JUNE 92, 94% 

•Striker plays ertremely well, and ottere all ihe mows we have tome to expect but within an 
excellent 3D play area. The players are ertremely responsive, and perform their many kicks 
and passes with slyle and ease, and the compute? op pone nls are sel to lax Ihe player as they 
work Iheir way through Ihe many teams on offer. SfrfJrerlstbe perfect complement to the Ante 
game, and vice versa H has speed, addicliveness and myriads ol options. It's a stunning debut 
by Rap and all Stritor is missing are the had time oranges...' Stert Merrett 

At a time when the whole world was Kick Ott crazy, il made a lot ol sens* to release a soc- 
eer game ol one larm or another. Many ware poor clones of Kick Off. most were just 
managerial games cashing in on the trend. Rage Software, previously known as Special fit, 
took Ihe brave step at approaching Ihe genre wilh a completely new system. Instead of viewing 
the pilch Irom above, a forced perspective was brnoght In with the player looking; 'along' Ihe 
pitch from he hind their own goal The same amnonl ol Ihe pilch was visible as Kick Off, and 
interestingly enough, it managed lo scroll at much Ihe same rate 

Host surprising ol all was (ha lacl lhal It played as well as Kick Off. The odd viewpoint still 
throws most people Ihe first couple nl times Ihey play il, hut you soon get used to It. The lacl 
lhal il has now been a roaring success within the console market is a real testament lo its 
payability. It hasn't even begun lo dale yet, so Ihe mark remains right at the top. ~-^*jkh 





TURRICAN 2 - Rainbow Arts 

REVIEWED: FEBRUARY 91, 94% 

'All the addictive shoot 'em up adien that made the firsl game so enjoyable has bean 
retained, vet somehow this new version seems Ireshand dillerent. There-jigged aliens 
make lor a real challenge, and although the power-ups are spread quite generously through 
Ihe game, its dilliculty level is pitched to make Ihe game challenging without being frustrat- 
ing or too easy. In all, Jarriun H is another fine product from Rainbow Arts and a perfect 
tol low-up lo the superb original. It surpasses everything Ihey wEntoutla achieve and Is a 
game lhal any self-respecting shoot 'em up fan should own.' Sieve Merrett 

At a lime when everyone was striving to create arcade quality original action games, 
Turricea was standing head and shoulders above most of its contemporaries. Featuring lull 
50Hz scrolling and animation and stylish graphics, it looked great and sold even better. So It 
came as no surprise when a sequel was released, What was surprising was that il was even 
heller. Although much ot the game had a similar leel, and many ol the original features were 
slid Ihftre, the inclusion of bigger and better weapons, levels and bad guys made il all Ihe 
more enjoyable. 

Even now, when games lhat run in a Irame are ten a penny, it's still huge fun to play and 
alien gets loaded up here In the office al lunehlimes. A personal favoo rile ol Dan's, the game 
hasn't aged at all. and can still give a lot of games a run lor Iheir money. A 
Superstar wall worthy of the title. 






ZfP*' 



^fcwi 



90 



£*. 




Games 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



GOLF - Microprose 

REVIEWED: DECEMBER 91, 94% 

Micmpross Golf is a classic. It remains so because the game Is as complete as j| could he 
wrttiout you actually getting oul there y nurse II and spoiling that Sunday aliernoon stroll. II you 
play gall, it's, a musl. If you don't, then alter jusl a lew rounds on lite Amiga, you'll be making 
enquiries dawn al the local club - and, whatever the outcome. Sunday afternoons will never he 
the same again.' Garth Sisrnpiet 

Sports games are generally well tale red lor. There are dozens of football, rugby, Iannis 
and critical games, but there has only been one or two deceit golf games, LsaoerooattS ir\6 
Links have always been firm favourites, bul Ihere have been lei times as many diili ones, 
Microprose Golf is without a doubl Ihe best one lo ever appear, and a game that I still play on a 
weekly basis. Like the real thing, you Just can't gel tired of moving around the greens and lalr- 
ways. trying different combinations and approaches. There are slacks ol options to tailor Ihe 
game to your lilting, a whole selection ol different tournaments and challenges lo play, plus silt 
different courses and all manner ol computer opponents. Thanks to the polygon graphics, Ihe 
courses all look significantly different, and Ihe fad that its a simulation rather than a computer 
version nf the sport means that anyone who has ever picked up a club will find their way around 
these fairways inslamiy , One round an this, and you II never say golf is dull again. 




SOCCER KID - Krfeatis 

REVIEWED: SEPTEMBER 93, 93% 

Soccer Kid is an immense game and lots of tun It play. The action is relentless, the re a re 
plenty ol pick-ups and bonuses lo colled (essential in Ihis kind ol game), and the graphics 
and animation are superb. Best ol all, the ball bounces around Ihe screen In a 'highly realis- 
tic manner. Surprisingly, Ihis wasn't much ol a programming challenge, but It looks 
impressive nonetheless. From Soccer Kid's cheeky grin cuteness to his amazing hall han- 
dling expertise this game shouts class. It's delinitely a contender for one ol Ihis year's lop 
ID games, II nol the top spot itself.' Jolm Mather 

Platform game heroes have always had strange powers , bul what about a game where 
the star is a keen football lanatlc who is rarely seen without a ball al his feet? Thai's exactly 
what Krisalis created when they came up with Ihe idea ol SssctrKti, and It's a novel twist 
thai saw Ihe Kid rising 111 rough the charts as everyone agreed with John Mather's wise 
words. An extremely playable plallorm rump, Soccer Kitf had you controlling the Kid across 
dozens si levels, using his amazing ball control to propel a small leather sphere all over the 
screen, as well as adapting it slightly lo increase his jump height and running speed. 
There's far too much to go into here, bul lake it Iron) me, it's ureal! 



93% 



ff"j-\'j',i * v • f ,*• v ' "* ^-t 

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MONKEY ISLAND 2 - Lucasfilm 

REVIEWED: JUNE 92, 95% 

'Moniisf island 2 has genuine wit and oodles nl charm. Fine lunedto perfection, everything is 
up-front for all to see, hear and read. The story alone should keep you gripped to the very last 
word, LsChwk's Revenge is truly a masterly mi ir of wacky humour and stunning images. I'm a 
massive Ian ol adventures and I can honestly say th at they just don 't come a ny better tha n 
this.' RikHsynes 

The Secret Of Monkey island 2 is a game that Lucasfilm had been working towards Irom 
Ihe moment the company was formed. One gl the lines! graphic adventures to date, It tells the 
lata ol one Guybrush Threepwond as he searches for the biggest treasure ol all - The Big 
Whoop, On the way he meets many of his adversaries Irom the original Secret Of Monkey 
iriMtf, along with all his old pals such at Elaine Marley and the voodoo Lady. It's big, It's 
tough Ml Ifi « classic. 

But il did come out over a year ago, and things happen quickly In the adventure business 
and any of Ihe game's most popular aspects have been improved upon since it's release. For 
example. Lucaslilm's new masterpiece, Pay Oi The Tealacle. has ten limes the humour and 
ten limes the complexity of this, while offering a more user friendly control system. It's still a 
lot ol fun lo play , and sti 1 1 a s eh alls ng i ng as II was , but better gam as are appear- -fflpK 
■no now, so it loses a couple ol points. j'J Efl 




SYNDICATE - Bullfrog 

REVIEWED: JULY 93, 94% 

'This is the game I've been wailing for lor years. No holds barred, lull-oulmegadeith violence. 
No morals, no prisoners, jusl grab the biggest sod off gun you can find and total a town. The 
only thing this game could be compared to is a real lime version of Laser Squad, bul then that's 
in Ih e loosest sense ol the word . I only have one real criticism . Wh en yoo walk into a bu 1 1 din g 
you can't see what's going on. The only way to keep track of the action is to use the scanner and 
move the cursor around the general area as it changes shape when it's over another person. 
Apart Irom tbal Ihis is one ol Ihe best games I've played in years. The sheer size, violence and 
huge amounts of action makes for totally addictive gameplay. Pul all other purchases on hold, 
this is an essential buy.' Mark Patterson 

Bullfrog, obviously getting a little bored with Gods and villages, moved lorward rn lime wilh 
Syndicate and created a chilling gangland scenario that was so violent. It had lo be lonerf down 
for public consumption. Take your agents downtown and complete a series of fifty mission, 
destroying buildings, people, cars and just about anything that moves. Using a system 
upgraded from the PoputotisZD engine, Ibis atmospheric strategy blasl is guile unlike anyffiing 
else, and begs lo be exploited by the bandwagon jumpers in the industry. Like Mart ^^m± 
said, it's an essential buy . I'^Sfffl 



91 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



GAMES 




WIN AN INSTANT 

GAMES LIBRARY! 

It's not every day that you get to win an instant games library but that's what's on offer in this truly amazing compe- 
tition. We 've teamed up with The Hit Squad, purveyors of fine-quality budget-priced games, to offer one lucky 
winner their entire back catalogue. Yes, that's right, every single Hit Squad titte could he yours! 

So how can you get your hands on this mountain of top-notch software? Easy* Simply study the W screen shots on 
the opposite page, see if you can figure out which games they are from, and then write down your guess for each 
one beneath the appropriate picture. Then clip out the coupon and mail your entry to: GAMES BONANZA, CU Amiga, 
EMAP Images, 30-32 Farringdon Lane, London, ECiR 3AU. Well, what are you waiting for?! 




92 



. • -^ .__- 




AMES 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



HIT SQUAD CHECKLIST 

Ovef the years, the Hit Squad label has established itself as the premier bud- 
get label, purr ping out a steady stream of top-quality Amiga games at bargain 
basement prices. And our competition lets you win the lot! So here, checklist 
chums, are all the games you can win in our rather groovesome compo, 



The following titles all cost £7.99 







□ 


Pang 


□ 


Afterburner 


□ 


Pfatoon 


n 


Altered Beast 


□ 


Power Drift 


□ 


Arkanoid II 


I 


Predator 


□ 


Badlands 


□ 


Puzznic 


□ 


Batman the Caped Crusader 


D 


Rainbow Islands 


□ 


Batman The Movie 


□ 


Rambo III 


□ 


Beach Volley 


D 


Red Heal 


D 


Bubble Bobble 


D 


Renegade 


□ 


Cabal 


D 


RoboCop 


a 


Castle Masler 


□ 


R-Type 


a 


Chase HQ 


D 


Run the Gauntlet 


D 


Crazy Cars 


□ 


Shadow Warriors 


D 


Dragon Ninja 


D 


Sly Spy 


□ 


Daley Thompson Olympic 


□ 


STUN Runner 




Challenge 


□ 


Super Hands On 


a 


Escape from the Planet ot the 


□ 


Total Recall 




Robot Monsters 


□ 


Untouchables 


a 


Fun School 2 


□ 


Voyager 


a 


Ghostbusters 2 


□ 


Wizball 


a 


Head Over Heels 


□ 


Pictionary 


a 


Ivanhoe 


□ 


Test Drive II 


a 


Jack Nicklaus Golf 


□ 


Trivial Pursuit 


a 


Last Ninja 2 


□ 


Prince of Persia 


a 


Lombard RAC Rally 


a 


Hudson Hawk 


a 


Midnight Resistance 


a 


RoboCop 2 


a 


NARC 


a 


Smash TV 


D 


Navy Moves 


a 


Pitfighter 


a 


New Zealand Story 


a 


RBI 2 


a 


Nighlbreed Arcade 


a 


Terminator 2 


a 


Operation Wolf 

The following titles all cost 


a 


Pro Tennis Tour 




between £9-99 and £1 2,99. 


□ 


The Immortal 






a 


MIG-29 


D 


Strikefleet 


a 


Chase HO 2 


O 


4th & Incbes 


□ 


Hardball 


□ 


The Simpsons 


a 


Mean 1 B 


a 


Populous &nd the Promised 


a 


Toki 




Lands 


a 


Shadowands 


a 


WWF 


a 


Grand Prix Circuit 


n 


688 Attack Sub 


a 


Hard Drivin" II 


a 


Budokan 


a 


Super Space invaders 


a 


The Cycles 


a 


Hook 


□ 


Addams Family 


D 


Blue Angels 


D 


Hard Nova 


a 


Parasol Stars 


a 


Gunboat 


a 


Indianapolis 



HIT SQUAD COMPO 




i.. 



1 ., This competition isn't open lo employees of EMAP Images or Ocean Software. 

2. The closing dale for enlries is February 28th, 1994. 

3. The editor's decision is final. 

4. No correspondence will be entered into, 

5. There can be no cash alternative. 




Milt H* I 





8 




10, 



I'd like to win a mountain of software, so I've written down the names of the 10 

games which I think you've taken the screenshots from. 

If, by some miracle, I should actually win the competition, please send my prize to: 



Name: ... 

Address: 



City 



Posleode . 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Games 




Budget Games 




— - m — ' — ■—'■*■ 



■niniiiii miMii 



The lirsl really successful movie license, 
Robowp was the lirst Ocean game: to utilise 
the now overused mixture of puzzle and 
arcade sequences, Stepping inla (he metallic 
insoles □( a I' chrome dome himsell, players 
must blast their way throw gh 3 rogue's gallery 
of bad guys until reaching the end dI level lor 
a lace oil against a larger guardian. 
Alternating between Ihese arcade sequences, 
though, are a series of puzzles, ranging Irom 
a cross-hair-based shoot em up scene lo a 
photo-fit sequence, where Robu must identify 
a particular (elan. The miiture is a little 
d aled now and the action re petifive bu1 . an 
Ihe whole. Hobocop is still a playable blaster 
- if a I iff! e on the easy sid e . 

HIT SQUAD £7.99 



tffifr 




filler a dodgy conversion ol Operation WolL 
lans al the series were relieved when the 

sequel was almost Identical lo its arcade par- 
ent. Operation tommmi combines the 
sideways-scrolling action ol the lirsl game 
with a lorward -strolling section which has 
since been much-copied in games such as 
Space Gun and Line of Fire. Once again, we 
are in rescue Ihe hostages' territory, as the 
player and a Irlend attempt lo blast a path 
through lo the escape plane al the end of Ihe 
game. All manner uf extra weapons are 
thrown al ynu, and must he shot to defied 
them and Ihe assailants blown away, The 
one major fault with Op Thunderbolt \$ thai 
initially the player is lell without a gun -sight, 
making aiming very difficult Indeed, hut 
when Ihe laser device is found all is soon 
rectified and Ihe action can really get going. 
A superb conversion which has stood 
Hie test ol lime. 

HIT SQUAD £7.99 



When money's too tight to mention, why not turn 
to the burgeoning budget sector and check out 
some of tbe cracking games on offer at knock- 
down prices. Here's just a few of tbe many 
bargains to be bad... 




GHOULS 'N' GHOSTS 

This sequel arrived in its Amiga form before Elite's conversion ol its forerunner. 
Gbosts'n Goblins, and far exceeded it in every respect, Retaining Ihe 'run and jump' action of 
the original, Ghouls has a larger and more varied play area, will) a whole host of zombies, 
magicians and vultures impeding your progress. The storyline recounts how Arthur the Knight's 
babe has been kidnapped by Satan himself, and whisked away to his demonic lair. Armed only 
with a handlul ol lances nnd 9 suit ol armour, you must sleer Arthur through Ihe game's six lev- 
els until you get a chance lo kill off Satan and rescue your girly. This action then proceeds 
through platform-filled towns and areas, where Arthur can colled extra weapons loaid his 
progress. Graphically, although they are tiny. Ghouls' sprites are well-drawn and detailed, and 
the backdrops are ol an even higher standard, In addition, supporting the action are six of Ihe 
best tunes you II ever hear on your Amiga - all of which an crwrteiy of Tim Follln. ^^— ^^ 

KIXXC7.99 <?EP. 




RAINBOW ISLANDS 

This is quite simply the best budget game yon are ever likely to see. Graftgold's near-perfecl 
conversion ol the f aim coin -op is a 5 even-leu el platform affair, starring the ever-so-cule Hub as 
he Hies lo clamber m the lop ol Ihe screen. The levels are based on set themes, such as 
Vampires, Toys and Armies, and along Ihe way, numerous theme-related nasties leap nut at our 
dungaree-clad hero. Pressing the lire button, however, launches Bub'! secret weapon - a 
deadly rainbow. Not only da Ihese kill nasties, bul they can also be used lo climb across previ- 
ously inaccessible areas. With loads of bonuses, arcade-quality graphics and some of the most 
addictive gameplay you'll ever witness, Rainbow Islands is quite easily a contender for the besl 
Amiga game of all lime, Everything about it is stunning, and I lind it Impossible lo fault. 

THE HIT SQUAD £7.99 




THE UNTOUCHABLES 

Once again. Ocean used their combination of 
game styles to create a neat package, and all 
credit to Special FK for creating a moody and 
atmospheric game. As Eliot Ness, leader ol a 
tough band of law-enforcers Ihe player is tart 
to complete seven arcade sections before At 
Capone is finally put behind bars. Starting in 
a warehouse, where Ness must locale hollies 
of bo Die whilst avo i ding the bullets, of 
patrolling hoods, ihe game closely follows Hie 
film's plot as the player progresses. These 
scenes lake the shape ol an Op hYotf-slyle 
rool-top shootout and a really clever pram 
sequence, where Hess must sleer the pram 
and its infant contents to salety whilst plug- 
ging Capone's cronies. All seven sections 
play really well , even if Ih e first two are a lit 
lie long. 

HIT SQUAD £7.99 




£J3£ 



Z-OUT 

As a budget release, this is an absolute steal. 
Rainbow Ads five stage blaster nicies ideas 
Irom virtually every sh oof 'em up ever 
released, hul rises above the competition 
lhanks lo ils utterly addictive gameplay. H's 
hack to the rJ-Type-slyle gameplay, as Ihe 
levels unveil their Gigeresque aliens and 
underwater creatures, with all Ihe usual beam 
weapons and missiles you'd 1 expect to see. 
However, whereas fl- Type stuck to one pat- 
tern, by borrowing Ideas from other blasters, 
larger spaceships appearand must be 
blasted bil by bit. and Ihe enemy waves attack 
in a manner more accustomed to the likes ol 
Xenon II and Scramble. Add lo this some ol 
the most breath-taking graphics the Amiga 
has seen, and it's Ihe linal cherry on an 
already succulent cake. Everything about !• 
Oof is brilliant: it's fast, il's graphically 
superb, and it's only eight quid! ^— —^ 

KIXXC7.99 ^fcP> 




Games 



AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE '94 







A 11 hough Tiertejt "S Cape Dm conversion con- 
lains vi nil ally everything Iram the all singm'. 
all leap in 'coir-op, itsliit lacks that certain 
something la keep the player's attention Set 
in a Russia of the lutjre. Hru Strider must run 
and jump his way through an evil Tsar 5 bio- 
metallic base, using his trusty sward la cut a 
path, through to the guardian who awaits ai 
the end of each stage. The levels are varied 
and Interesting, wilh a large selection at gun 
turrets and baddies, and the assorted stages 
lake the player through Amazon i an -style 
to rests and (lie wintry wastelands ol Siberia. 
The main plus about Strider \s that the game 
is easy in play, with antra weaponry and 
power-ops adding Ic- the tun. However there 
it a leeling nl luck rather than skill as 
progress is made, and the loss of life Is 
otten dawn to Ihe illogical actions si the 
aliens rather Ihan Ihe fault ol the player. 
It's debatable if the flame will keep your 
interest lor long. 

KIXXE7.99 




PRINCE OF PERSIA 



When Dnmark originally released litis in 
December 9D, it breathed new Hie Into Ihe 
platform genre. Up until then, the platform 
game had become stale and bland, with 
nil me reus c ontenders to the Mario Ih rone dis- 
appearing without a trace. POP, however, 
went completely Ihe opposite way and era- 
sled a game that even console owners went 
green at. Controlling one ol the must athletic 
and superbly- animate d sprites ever, the 
player was given Ihe task ol ejtp I tiring a 
series of trap-laden levels In search ol your 
kidnapped girly. Setagalnsl a light time- 
limit, Ihe game is the Amiga's ago i vale nl ol 
an Errel Flynn movie: It has sward-lights, 
grisly ends lo the unwary traveller, and 
jumps that require pixel perfect positioning. 
01 course, all this has bean tried before, out 
none have put the m tog alh ar with Ihe 
panache that Broderhund's coding shews, 

THE HIT SQUAD 
£7.99 



RICK DANGEROUS 

Firebird s square -jawed here's debut gets another airing, and he's jusl as trash as when he lirst 
appeared. Basically an extension on Ihe popular platform genre. Hick D takes an Indy-style sce- 
nario set over five stages and mixes in some o! Ihe most devious traps and pitfalls you are ever 
likely to encounter. Graphically, the game Is excellent, with squat and detailed sprites sol 
against deliberately bland backdrops -which even feature a black and while mode fore-movie 
bulls. The five levels are incredibly lough, with loads ol natives and Nazis to shoot, prod, or 
blow up, and a series ol secret rooms await your attention. Hick is one of the best platform 
games I've ever pJayad, and is an absolute steal al such a low price. ^_ 

KiXX£7.99 £ffi 




A real rarity in the arcades, Pingiss rather spilty shoot em up with a dilferente. Cast as a hlg 
game hunter, ynur prey is a series ol bouncing balloons which must be popped by shooting 
them. Contact wilh any ol them, theujh, proves fata I. and as the game progresses, the levels 
are gradually cluttered with extra platforms and ladders to hamper your manoeuvrability. In 
addition, a series ol creatures scamper hither and tilher, and will temporarily disarm the 
hunter. Extra power-ups add to Ihe 'pop'-tabulous Fun, and can double your fire power or extend 
the strict time' limit slightly. I must admit that I'm a real Pang tin. It's not the best last-paced 
game I've played and some ol the earlier levels are a little tedious lo have lo play through, but 
it's addictive in lis own funny way, and contains that all-important germ ol gameplay to keep 
ycu interested, --^^, 

HIT SQUAD £9.99 ^& 





TURRICAN 2 

Comprising elements of nearly every Amiga 
shoot 'em up, Tunisan ii is a supreme blast 
which still outstrips mosl ol its full -price 
rivals. Although not boasting a great deal over 
Its predecessor, the sequel spoils improved 
graphics and effects, whilst retaining Ihe 
run 'n shout scrolling action ol the original. In 
addition, it also lakes the opportunity to 
Expand nor tin-plated hero's armoury, and 
adds numerous new bombs, lasers and 
ellects. For those of you not lamiliar with the 
series, then this is your perfect chance lo gel 
acquainted. Tighter level design means each 
level offer; a fairly still challenge with loads 
ol secret blocks and rooms wailing to he dis- 
covered. 

KIXX£7.99 




* c 



55P 



JAMES POND 

Before (here was Hobeeod, there was Pong... 

James Pond, and whilst Ihe games are radi- 
cally different in slyie. Millennium's lirst 
aquatic outing is still tun lo play. Minus Ihe 
extending midriff powers of the second game, 
Pond is out lo slop the evil Doctor Maybe from 
polluting the world's oceans and killing oil all 
ol our hero's chums with deadly toxins. Thus, 
in a series Ot scrolling area de.'advenl ore mis- 
sions, James is nut to thwarl the plans and 
slop the tainting of Ihe seas. All this is 
achieved via a series of object-related puzzles 
which gradually allow Pond to access addi- 
tional stages in Ihe game. Ijnlolunately, 
though, the pollution is affecting Ihe sea-life 
who consequently lum on the aquatic agent, A 
hit slow in places. James Portfs major prob- 
lem is lhal its sedate pace males il rather too 
easy to salve. Wane ol Ihe nasties prove any 
real hassle which, whilst not doing anything 
for Ihe game's lasting appeal, may make il 
worthy lor the younger player. 

GBHE7.99 




SHADOW WARRIORS 

Slightly overshadowed by the release of Total 
Recall lirst time round. Shadow Warriors is a 
playable conversion ol Ihe popular Taito coin- 
op. Starring two lithe Ninjas, the players} 
have been given the task at infiltrating a ilruy 
runner's base in an assassination mission, 
What separates Shadow hum the countless 
other martial arts games available is the Ilex- 
Ibility al Ihe characters and their 
surroundings. Whilst many games purport lo 
let the player fully interact with trees and 
walls, Shadow Warriors allows players to 
swing from Ihe lampposts, uproot lelephune 
boxes and kick people into or against walls. 
As the duo progress , the ir surroun din gs 
change friim streets to swamps and eventu- 
ally into Mr Big's lair, and all boast an army 
ol sprites out to halt your progress. Although 
it's by no means the ultimate conversion, it 
makes Doable Craa/an's Lee brothers 
look like Hinge and Bracket. /4V<K 

HIT SQUAD C7.99 <4P 



» 



95 



J fteiDvjrum ti 



tlvtil 




lVID€OMfflST€B] 



Music 



Clarity 16 




version 1.5 



Clarity! 6 is our premier, professional sound sampler 
allowing mte up to 32KHz in \b bit stereo and up to 
48KHzin 16 bit mono on a Standard Amiga; accelerated 
machines can handle faster sampling rates. 
The software provides extensive features including full edit 
control r a MIDI keyboard emulator, a sample sequencer, 
many special effects, FFT analysis and much more. 

New Version 1 .5 has an up-to-date Workbench 3 look, in its 
own window and includes many enhancements allowing 

full compatibility with faster Arnicas. 



Meg a ■osound 




Our brand-new, 8-bit stereo, 

direct-to-disk budget sampler is now shipping. 

The Megalosound software is packed Ml of easy-to-use 

editing features, special effects and extras such as the ability 

to print waveforms and sample information, 

The package allows sampling up to 84KHz mono and 

56KHz stereo to memory and up to 21 KHz stereo to hard 

disk man A120Q. Supplied with a hardware volume 

, ontml and an extensive 144-page manual,. Megalosound is 

impressive value at only £34.95. 

Pro-MIDI Interface 

This interface allows vou to connect a MIDI system to any 

Amiga computer via the serial port of your machine using a 
single multi-core cable. The interface site conveniently next 
to your computer and provides MIDI In, Thru and two Out 
connections, Pw-MTDl is compatible with all leading Amiga 
MIDI software and comes complete with a miscellany of 
MIDI PD utilities on disk. 




Prices 

CtaritylG 
Megatosottnd 
Pro-MIDI Interface 
VideoMaster AGA 
VideoMaster RGB 
eolavrHt&ster 



£149,95 
£34.95 
£24,95 
£79.95 

£139.95 
£69.95 




VideoMaster AGA 

VideoMaster combines the beauty of a video digitiser, the 
fun of a sound sampler and some superb sequencing 
software to provide a true Multimedia system that is a joy to 
use This is the one package that you need for producing 
high quality stills & 25 frames/second movies with sound. 

New A 1 200 ■'■ Ahiiu version. Previously, only A500 owners 
have been able to take advantage of VideoMaster; now 
A 1200 and A600 users can work with this amazing package 
and enjoy brand-new features such as superb HAM 8 
(A12Q0 only* and 640*512 digitised stills and 160x100 25 
fames per setsttd monochrome video with sound. 
VideoMaster AC A plugs into the PCMCIA slot thus 
leaving your Amiga free for further expansion. 

ColourMaster 

To complement the VideoMaster 

system, we have developed a high quality RGB colour 

splitter which allows you to automatically digitise full 
colour movies /stills, directly from the VideoMaster 
software The splitter is packaged with VideoMaster RGB. 

The picture above is an utt-r&nudutt skat fflbw ootsidt Mtamfarf'* 
officer with * FtommtU «wws*fcr s^ tigHted wtih CWwrMnter 

and HfeflMufer AGA.aH within « feu.' seconds! 





AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Game 



TOKI 

Ocean France have come up with some real 
corkers in the past-, and (heir conversion dI 
the Toki coin -op is spot o n , 11 you' re a 'an ol 
the original arcade machine', then you'll abso- 
lutely love the Amiga version as il's an almost 
identical pixel- by- pixel recreation. Levels 
include a cave- 1 iks world, an underwater 
stage, a jungle, an underground interna and a 
heavily fortified prison, f on 're only armed 
Willi globules of spit to begin with|!|, bul 
there are Five nillnrom typi?s of shol available, 
including triple-lire and a neal lis me -In rower 
Bile ct Itial sen ds v du r vi cti ms to a lie 17 grave . 
Everything's against Ihe clock, Ihough. so you 
can 't waste to a mu c li li me e xplo rin g ea c h 
level. Graphically. Ihis is jusl like Ihe coin- 
op. although the sound is a bit ol a let down 
and the in-game lone is positively grating 
altera while. Action-wise, Ihis is a well- 
paced platform game, with plenty ol obstacles 
to overcame end some highly inventive nas- 
ties - look out lor the swinging apes and huge 
end-ol-level monstrosities. Easy to play bul 
dilliciill to complete. Tokiit a polished game. 
It might be three-years old, bul it's up there 
with the best, 

HIT SQUAD £9.99 



<J^ 




SMASH TV 

II you like your games coated in en extremely 

violent veneer, then Smash TV should be 
right ep your street, Mix sbosl 'em up action 
with a team ol baseball-wielding thugs and 
you've got a good idea aboul what to expect 
here, The action comes thick and last as you 
take control of a contestant in an ultra -violent 
fulurislic game show. The aim is to collect as 
many dilterenl prizes as passible (such as 
videos and toasters) while avoiding an army 
ol mutant psychos who are after the greatest 
prize or all... your lite! The graphics aren't up 
to much and Ihe in-game sounds are rather 
tinny, bul for a mindless blast this really can't 
be beat. Each room is packed full ul prizes, 
mortars, explosives, laser emplacements and 
hidden bombs, and before you know II Ihe 
screen is Flooded with ihe aforementioned 
thugs who won't rest until they've battered 
you into a mushy putp. Armed with a paltry 
machine gun to begin with, there are various 
power- ups scattered around each room which 
can transform yuur weapon into a slice Yd ice 
death machine. Alter working your way 
through a number of screens, yau come up 
against larger bosses and that's when Ihe Tun 
really starts! 

HIT SQUAD £7.99 



ir^fo 





LOTUS 2 

Lotas Esprit Turbo Challenge was the game that really made Gremlin Graphics the force it is 
today, lotos 2, featuring the Lotus Elan, merely strengthened the reputation of the original. 
Rather than race around a series ol looped tracks as part ol a league, you have lo make your 
way across eight long courses, taking you over Ihe snowy mountains, through Ihe dark night city 
streets, across a desert and even along a motorway where it's a little too easy to career into the 
wrong lane and get hit by oncoming traffic! The varying conditions can pose a real problem -try 
anticipating a sharp right hand turn in extremely foggy conditions - and so add to the game 
challenge greatly. Lotus 2leatures Ihe same single and double player modes ol the original, 
with the big difference being that in solo mode Ihe player gels a lull-screen view ol Ihe road. 
Add to that Ihe fact that you can link up Iwn machines and play with a total at tour players., 
and you have one excellent excuse lor phoning your matesl The sprites are slick and con- 
vincing, as is the scaling ol objects hem horizon to foreground. In fact, the overall 
impression of speed can be quite overwhelming, particularly on the log and snow (racks. An 
exciting race game with more than enough in Ihe way of challenge and variety. Al 
ihis price, you'd be a fool to miss it! 

G8H £9.99 



Cfpi 




STORM MASTER 

Storm Master combines an unusual scenario, some excellent graphics and an easy-to-leam 
control system into an absorbing game. The player is cast as the new ruler ol Ihe wind-swept 
realm ol Enlia, which is in the middle nl a war with its neighbour Sharkaania. The main aim Is 
lo destroy Sharkaania's seven cities, whilst preventing them horn destroying yours, Every deci- 
sion that's made in Storm Master has a long-term strategic consequence, so you'll have lo think 
carefully before clicking. Once battle commences yoo can choose lo lake control of the Hying 
ships you've constructed in a 3D combat sequence using crossbows and catapults. Normally this 
part of a strategy game is very weak, hut here the aclion is thick and fast. The attention tu detail 
and overall payability are superb. The game looks good and demands a lot of deep thinking il 
you' re to succeed. 

GWP£2.99 



ESCAPE FROM THE 
PLANET OF THE 
ROBOT MONSTERS 

Winner ol Ihe 'Longest Came Title Ever' 
award, Robot Monsters is a spool o1 count- 
less space-based B-Movics, and pits Iwn 
heroic fighters against a mass of manic 
robots- Played across a series of isometric 
zones, the game is basically a shoot 'em op, 
as the two laser-toting heroes blast their way 
(h rough the scrolling areas, in search ol an 
exit. Along the way, they run the risk ol gel- 
ling impaled, electrocuted and shot, all ol 
which are depicted in brilliant car- 
loon style, 

HIT SQUAD £7.99 




GAME 
COMPILATIONS 

Representing incredible value, games compi- 
lations can be an absolute steal - but only if 
you like every game that's included. 
Unfortunately, many publishers will bundle a 
couple of excellent games with a complete 
stinker, thus lesseniog the appeal of the pack. 
But il's not all doom and gloom, as there are 
still some excellent bargains to he had. 



SPORTS MASTERS 
EMPIRE £29.99 
TEL: 0B1 343 7337 




Here's in easy way lo gel Ml without having to 
go through all that trouble ol teaming a sport, 
practising until you became good al it and all 
ihe other pointless ellori soma people purl 
themselves through. Sports Masters from 
Empire Is ail you need lo become a top foot- 
baller, goiter, tennis player or Indy driver like 
Nigel Mansell. PGA TootGotfls probably the 
best (mown game on here, and that's simply 
because It's one of the besl all round gall 
lilies ever. Three courses, graded dilliculty 
levels and some really smart graphics keep it 
as worthwhile as it was the day il came out. 
Indianapolis 5B0. while not being the most 
detailed racing game around, is definitely one 
of the fastest, and features a unique lostanl 
Replay feature, felting you see some ol the 
most mental smashes ever Irpm a variety ol 
angles. Infogrames' Advantage Tennis is 
probably ns bard as UklKil living. Fast and 
smooth, you've got your work cut out just try- 
ing to keep your eye on the ball, let alone try 
and h It Ihe th ing I The on ly d ult ga me in here 
is European Championship '$2, bul what does 
it matter? You're slill getting three great 
games lor a tenner apiece! 



SOCCER STARS 
EMPIRE £25,99 
TEL 081 343 7337 








If you're loulbail crazy, football mad, then this 

could be the besl compilation 'thai you've 
overbad'. Four arcade soccer titles, ranging 
from the superb Kid Off? to Ihe thoroughly 
awful GaziaZ. In lacl, now I come lo think ol 
it, Micraptose Sorter and Emtyn fiagiies 
InlemnUiiaal Soccer ate lairty bad loo. Oddly 
one ugh, both of the last two were really, 
really good on the old Commodore H, but 
tailed to make the grade when converted over 
lo Ihe Amiga. Mkroprase Soccer was Ihe first 
to olb all ga me to feature that now sla nd ard top 
view, white Emiyn Hughes lealures Ihe then 
standard side view and an interesting player 
slats section . Gana P. or* the other hand, is 
really awful. Tiny sprites, no payability and a 
completely dull license. But then we come to 
Ihe star ol the show - Kick OttL We all know 
how good it is, and you don't really need me 
lo tell you that it's one of the besl soccer 
games ever, and the one thai really makes 
this compilation. 

97 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



GAMES 




TOP OF THE FLOPS 

The most abysmal Amiga games of all time! 




IN THE BIN! 



The Amiga 
has played 
host to 
some of 
the most 
mazing 
ground-breaking games 
ever published. 
Unfortunately, it's aiso 
had more than its fair 
share of absolute 
howlers. This is their 
story and its not a pleas- 
ant tale... 



WARNING: 

Those of a nervous disposition at weak 
c no striulioii should skip the naxl lew 
pages, lor here von' 11 rind a coLlectidn si 
some oltlte worst computer games ever 
published. Believe us, you'll he heading 
for the sick bag before you know ill 



We've all done it- gone and 
forked out a small fortune for a 
new game only to race back 
home, load it up and realise that what 
we've bought is the computer equiva- 
lent of a steaming heap of horse 
droppings! In everyone's gat™ collec- 
tion there's bound to be one or two 
complete turnkeys, so bad ihat you hide 
them away in the dimmest recesses of 
your bedroom (next to the Nick Berry 
records and (he Work Out with 
Anraka video). For every Frontier or 
Speedbati 2, there's a treasure trove of 
trash, a veritable mountain of medi- 
ocrity just waiting to be (unfortunately) 
discovered. With more full-price Amiga 
releases than ever before and a bur- 
geoning budget market, it's all too 
easy to tall into the tripe trap' and pur- 
chase a complete dodo of a game. But 
tear not, as the CU Amiga team are 
here lo steer you clear of the worst 
excesses of digital diarrhoea. 

HORROR MOVIES 

Let's start by taking a look at a genre 
that's choc-ful of chunder - yes, you 
guessed it, movie licenses. Although 
these are less frequent on the Amiga 
than ihey used to be, companies still 
attempt to push the latest block- 
buster movies and, in an effort fo cut 
costs because they've already 




You rttlly wouWn'l want * rinfl-aida iMl lo 
e»p**l*nce Ihl* pdacs- of drli«L. 

forked out a mint for the license, put 
out any old crap, hoping it'll sell on 
the back of the movie's publicity. The 
roll call of calamities includes such 
'gems' as Fright Night, Moonwalk&f, 
Jaws, Pink Panther and The 
Munsters - pathetic one and all. 

Of these, Microdeafs Fright Night 
must get a special mention as it was 
obscenely awful in almost every 
respect, The actual Fright Night films 
are fairly enjoyable affairs, but the 
game was a travesty. Written by 
industry veteran, Steve Bak, it 
involved guiding a huge, apparently 








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lip-toeing vampire sprite through a 
sprawling mansion, lumping on peo- 
ple and sucking their blood, and.„er, 
well, that's it! Basically, Fright Night 
was set within a six-room house, and 
ail the player had to do was pounce 
on the unfortunates wandering 
around il. Just lo add a little variety 
to the proceedings, bats attacked the 
main Sprite every now and then 
(which is odd, as the 'hero' was a 
vampire in the first place'), and the 
only real goal was to score as many 
points as possible by biting people 
before your energy expired. 

US Gold have also made forays 
into the movte tie-in world, but got 
their lingers badly burnt when they 
picked up the license to Michael 





AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 



Thin game stolid dafMMy haw bwn termi ■ 

Jackson's Moon walker. The tilrn 

itself was a ludicrous ego trip, bul at 
bast it could fall back en the music 
and special effects. Stripped of 
these, the game was a terrible mish- 
mash of maze and shoot 'em up 
action. It started with Michael's 
young mates in peril (how very 
prophetic!) as an evil Mr Big whisked 
them away. Driven by jealousy or 
whatever, a crap maze section simi- 
lar to Pacman unfolded as Mikey 
changed into a rabbit and tried to 
avoid two fal gits on motorbikes - 
hmmmm. Well, things then go from 
bad to worse as Mike turns into a 
robot for a scrolling blast affair which 
proved virtually unplayable thanks to 
■collision detection which was 
dodgier lhan his current alibi, and 
sluggish controls - and the game 
culminates in a final slow-moving 
battle with Mr. Big himself. The 
■question must arise as to why USG 
bothered at all. 

Other dreadful licenses include 
Mindscape's Captain Pl&nel (which 
quickly became known as Captain 
Janet around the office because of 
its wimpy gameplay and 'eco' -con- 
sciousness), Titus's Dick Tracy and 
US Gold's Godfather game, The last 
in the list deserves special mention. 
When you consider lhat Francis 
Ford Coppolla's films are steeped in 
atmosphere and feature a number of 
set-piece action sequences, they 
should have been ideal conversion 
fodder. So what* did we get? Another 

F vr.n i gam* 01 tiridlywinks 11 laslcr pitMl 
than thit tarry eonvw Hon... 




platform game and nol a \ivcy good 
one at that. Admittedly, it looked the 
business, with lush 32 -colour graph- 
ics, smoky streets, plush apartments 
- it had them all, but someone forgot 
to include the gameplay - it played 
like a brick. In. fact, it wasn't a million 
miles away from both Dick Tracy 
and the equally-interminable Crime 
Does Not flay- i.*. your character 
walks along and shoots people. Ad 
lib to fade. Just to keep you awake 
between stages, though, an 




Operation kVWT-esque scene inter- 
rupted the shooly bits. Hardly up to 
the standards set by the three films 
- and the game had about as much 
in common with the film as Shaq 
O'Neil has with Ronnie Corbett, 



8 



IN-OP 
TASTROPHES 



Arcade conversions have fared no 
better than their movie-based coun- 
terparts- 

If you think about it, its pretty 
obvious lhat you're not going lo be 
able to effectively replicate the latest 
arcade wonder on an Amiga. What 
you end up getting for your thirty 
quid is a barely recognisable conver- 
sion with half of the original features 
missing! Such was the case with 
Domark's STUN Runner conversion. 
The coin-op was a visually stunning, 
fast-paced affair that required fast 
reflexes to navigate the twisting 
bends of a sci-fi race track. The 
Amiga-equivalent was, in compari- 
son, like taking charge of a 
souped' up zimmer-frame wilh all the 
pace of a speeding snail. The slow 
frame rale meant ihal the once 
thrilling hairpin bends of (tie comers 
were as exciting as a Beetle Drive at 
the local Derby and Joan, 



Another botched conversion by 
the same company was Skull £ 
Cnosst'ones. Based on an already 
tawdry coin-op, the Amiga conver- 
sion managed to be even worse. 
Skull featured the wobbliest sprites 
seen since the earliest days of the 
Spectrum and I he gameplay was so 
pedeslrian and linear that if you 
played past the first level you were 
obviously the sort of person who 
enjoyed pain to such an extent that 
dodgy Dutch film-makers would be 
knocking on your door with a film 
contract. 

Then there were the Laserdisc 
conversions, Never had so little 
gameplay been spread across so 
many disks. First [here was 
Dragon's Lair, a stunning looking 



i (here no iuslics in lh» world 



» 




I^Licnnn 




99 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 




» game featuring real full-screen oar- 
toon animation lhat had Amiga 
owners slabbering with glee - until 
they tried playing it. This game was 
responsible for the destruction of 
more joysticks than every Track and 
Field sliek-wagglerever made. You 
see the trouble was, you didn't so 
much control your character, as offer 
suggestions as to which way he 
might want to go. More often than 
not. he'd completely ignore you, and 
nochaiantly walk straight into a trap - 
time after time after time... and the 
asking price? A mere 45 nicker to 
you guv. Despite universal slagging 
in the computer press and a hefty 
price tag, Dragon's Lasr is alleged to 
have sold by the skipload. 

CHRISTMAS TURKEYS 

It's Traditional to have turkey at 
Christmas, but in the past the soft- 
ware houses have taken this a bit too 
far. This year's biggie, Mortal 
KombaK is actually pretty good, 
which is spooky, as going by the rule 
book it should resemble a steaming 
heap of donkey manure. Street 
Fighter ti just managed to squeeze 
through without completely embar- 
rassing itself, but the role of dishonour 
stretches far into the history of the fes- 
tive season: WWF Wrestling 
(challenge a mate as you take the roll 
of a nancy boy in lycra Y-f rents, and 
mince around the ring slapping your 
opponent), T&Bnage Mutant Hero 
Turtles (no relation to the ooirmp, it 
set new lows in platform, gaming), 
Ghostbuslers II (the cause ot much 
gnef here at EMAP Towers alter the 




GOVERNMENT HEALTH WARNING 

Trie tallowing games are definitely bad Tor tour health and injurious la your wallet. Award yourself 
five points For every one ol the tallowing you never bought: Back to Ihe Future 2, Terminator Z (whkh 
we e mharrsssing ly gave a tour-page review slot to when it was originally released ■ blush! |, 
Papertooy2, European Football Champ, Quirun Europa, LED Storm, LasiDuel, Black Tiger, Judge 
Drefld, Espana Games 92. Popeye 2. Then* Park Mystery, STUN Runner; Darkman, Armalyte, 
ffirinrJtead. Aliened Beasl, FrenetlcDart Fusion, Techno Cop, Ray of the Rovers. Human Killing 
Machi ue. Street Fi glider. Cool World. John Lowe Ultimate Darts. WWF 1 * 2. Final Firjht. Predator II, 
Plan 9 From Ouler Space, Indiana Jones and th* Fate at Atlantis - The Arcade Game. Bonanza 
Brothers. Captain Planet. Venus. Final Blow, Rghozaiie, Skull & Crosshones, Teenage Queen, 
ESwAT, FOFT. HATT, Willy Beamish. Hare Raisin' Haunt. Gemini Wing, The Gndlataer, Dick Tracy, 
Chubby Gristle. Viven, Minia Spirits, Superski, Crime Does Not Pay (well, il did tar you. Titus'), Cteiy 
Cars. rjlf-Sn«e Warrior, Galactic Conqueror, Tom and Jeny, The Pink Panther, Jaws, Galaxy Forte.. 
Grand National . Space Ace. Many Moves, Army Maves. Pop Quiafloestton of Sport. Ivanhoe, Weird 



m 



one and only Brian Nesbit gave il a 
much deserved slating). 

G' DAY SPORT 

Sports games on the Amiga have 
tared considerably belter lhan most 
other genres. H's difficult to say why 
this should be, but when you've got 
games like Gosli, Sensible Soccer, 
Mlcroprose Golf, John Madden. 
Speedball 3, Striker and Archer 
McLsan's Snooker amongst many 
others, we're no! complaining too 
loudly! Even here, though, there are 
some absolute howlers, How about 
the Eddie the Eagle license Tram 
Loriciel? No, you didn't have to gome 
last by spamming about on ihe pisie, 








AMES 



AMIGA BUYERS GU1DE94 





Build y-our own &nwaj* ft*m - hurrahl 

instead you had lo take part in a ski 
jump event and compete for gold. 

Maybe it's fitting thai the corn- 
purer with Ihe best football games 
[Kick Off, $en$i Soccer and Goaty 
should also play host to (he world's 
worst. They don't come much worse 
than the Gazza games - yes, nol 
one but two absolutely abysmal 
Gazza-endorsed looiy games madE 
il to the nation's shelves. Gazza 1 
was a revolution: the first Hip- screen 
football game (the programmers 
could barely get the sprites lo hobble 
around, let alone scroll the whole 
screen!). Like some kind of sick joke, 
ihey hit back some time later with the 
top-down viewed sequel. This time 
featuring a real scrolling pilch, it 
wasn't so much a game of football as 
a kick-aboul with a bunch of Chelsea 
pensioners playing with a water-filled 
balloon. Maybe this was to be 
expected, alter all, fellow guming 
geordie Peler Beardsley fronted an 
earlier attempt which saw a mass of 
22 Hunchbacked Beardsley card- 
board-cutouts conducting early 
experiments into the aforementioned 
water balloon tactics. 

Perhaps the worst 'sports' game 
of all time was Elite's A Question of 
Sport. Boasting digitised pics, ol Bill 
Beaumont and his mates (well, actu- 
ally, I hey were egotist icat pics of 
Elite's in- house staff), the piayer was 
presented with a series of rounds 
loosely based on the TV series. What 
happened next was conspicuous by 




ttrtain flame styles is nothing naif as there are, after all, only supposed ta be 
sever, dille rent (j6 ares Howeuer. the following flames are just a little loo. samey to warrant 
the extra cash: 

Raioi/Qperatinn Harrier - same system, hath dull. 
Shadowlands.'Shadow Worlds - flood and' Krisalis, lei's hope nobody notices, 
Street Fighter/Human Killing Machine - different sprites, but ikials annul II. 
Beasi Buslers.'Space Gun - fiey, lei's replace the lembies with aliens! 
Question ol Sport/Mike Read's Pop Quii - can anyone tell them apart?! 
Salman/Terminator 2 - the lira! of many similar Ocean names. 
Crazy Cara/DII-Shore Warriof.'Galaclic Conqueror - ledium on land, sea or in span. 



JO Pool was Btriclly on*-«linwniilGnial. 

its absence, and the game was basi- 
cally a beat the clock affair with loads 
of tedious questions loosely slotted in 
to the televised rounds. No use of the 
Amiga's capabilities were made, but 
this didn't stop Elite copying the code 
again and relabelling it Mike Read's 
Pop Quiz. Actually whilst on Ihe sub- 
ject of Elite, let's not forgel their 
Grand National game - although, 
we'd love to! Control a horse as it 
runs upscreen, and press the fire 
button to make it jump over 
Beecher's Brook! Hardly the most 
varied of ggm^s, and about as much 
fun as walching National Velvet on a 
Sunday. 



» 



ARMY MOVES & HUMAN KILLING MACHINE 

What have these two games in common other than being completely aartiil? The answer Is, ahem, that we nave them away as soverdisks in 
our dim and dislanl past. Even sadder, lormer deputy editor, Steve Menett actually recnmmenilailthem as giveaways - and this from a man 
with a supposedly encyclopedic knowledge of games... 



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101 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 




GAME 



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OF THE 



Of course, once you've squeezed 
every ounce out of Lhe available 
licenses, (he only other path to 
pursue is original products- and 
judging by some of the games 
we've seen over the years, this 
isn't a strong point with the major- 
ity of software houses. You begin 
to wonder if the only requirement 
to- work in the software industry is 
a frontal lobotomy! Take Magic 
Garden from the now long -gone 
Electronic Zoo - go on, as no-one 
else- will! This multi-stage 
runaround featured a collection of 
gnomes who were forced, to 
explore a single screen environ- 
ment in an attempt to cut lhe 
grass and Stop the weeds grow- 
ing. Whoever designed this 
certainly worked for their P45! 
Beat 'em ups are a popular 
genre on the Amiga at lhe 




PLAN NINE FROM OUTER SPACE 

On paper 0*pm mustriaie looked like I pod Ids*. TUB reality was one of the worst 
adventures nw Expilofe building sites and graveyards in search of him reels - and if you do 

lind one you get Id watch live digitised seconds ol the shiftiest 1 homer. What a reward, 
Gremlin bunged in a copy ol lhe film with the game- and it comes to something when il 
proves mare enjoyable than a supposedly spool game - 



WORST GAME EVER! 

Yes although il took days o( soul -searching anil heartbreak. we'H linalt* manaoed w single 
out the most miserable piece of software ever to slide into an Amiga's disk drive. 
Laaaaaarjies and Gen'lemen. the more than worthy winner of lhe Reg Holdsworth Award lor 
Greatness is Gremlin's ROY OF THE HOVERS' You are Roy Race whose Hilchesler mates 
have been kidnapped by a property developer out lolum the Melch ester around into a car 
nark Exploring a lliek-streen play area, you had to solve the mini adventure helore going on 
lo play in an even duller fooly sim. Crap sprites, terrible music, and nothing to recommend. 
Boy, whal a stinker... 



moment. What with Street Fighter 

2, Body Blows, Btmenia and Pise 
of the Robots all vying for your 
shekels, the standard here is very 
high. But it wasn't always the 
case. The very first Streetfighter 
license was a dire alfair. but the 
coders were so proud of their 
appalling conversion that they 
changed lhe graphics and re- 
hashed il as Human Kitting 
Machine - complete with the 
abysmal "beat up the dog* sec- 
tion, 

God aims are another area 
where fools rushed in after lhe 
spectacular success of Wl axis' Srm 
City and Bullfrog's Populous. 
Anyone remember Millennium's 
Global Effect, steeped in ego -con- 
sciousness?! Ves. this was your 
chance to build sola r-pow era d 
energy plants and complex 

Al lB«st we were »pw»d WrttlTsw Cmrfcenl 



sewage systems. How very inter- 
esting, 



KURH 



ING 



film licenses, or it can just be a 
daft idea from the start - Manga- 
style porn in Teenage Queen 
anyone? Another problem can be 
the Amiga's disk-based loading 
system - waiting minutes for the 
next scene in Willy Beamish to 
load is probably the computer 
equivalent of watching endless 
repeats ol Open University. 

Perhaps tha most heinous crime 
of all, though, is to let a game slip 
through the quality control net with 
more bugs in il than the whole of 
lhe South American Rainforest 
and r believe me, this is more fre- 
quent than you could possibly 
imagine? Even quality games such 
as Kick Off 2 have suffered - kick 
the ball off a defender al the lop ol 
the screen -for a corner and you'd 
end up taking il in your own half of 
the pitch! Crashes are another hin- 
drance - nothing can he more 
annoying lhan racking up a top 
score only for the game to crash at 
an inopportune moment. Games 
testars are obviously nol what they 
used to be. Because, of course, 
games never used lo crash in the 
old days... 



There are many factors that can 
make a game cheesy or crap. It 
can be missed potential such as 
lhe aforementioned coin-op and 





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AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 



Books 



BOOKSHOP SPECIAL 




If knowledge is power then books must surely be the Trident missiles of the intel- 
lect, Understanding how things work is the basis for getting the most out of them, 
and that's especially true ol computers. Of course, on CU Amiga we deligh! in 
sharing our knowledge and experience with you. and hopefully that has helped 
you over the years, but there's only so far we can go. If you want to learn as much 
as possible about your computer, you're going to have to invest in some reading 
material; you never know, you might even enjoy the process! 

MASTERING AMIGA DOS 2 
VOLUME 1 

£21 .95 - BSB - 0923 894355 

When Bruce Smith and Mark Smiddy began work 
on what was intended as the definitive guide to 
AmigaDOS, they imagined a single info packed 
volume, It wasn't long before they realised that 
they were going to over-run so they split the book 
into two halves: a reference volume and a tuto- 
rial. 

This is the tutorial volume which has been 
designed to teach you how to use the Amiga's 
disk operaling system {DOS) and how |o get |he 
best from it. It's been very much designed with 
programming beginners in mind and introduces 
the most basic DOS concepts gradually and in 
language that you can understand. For example, it describes the way that files 
are stored on a disk, and how directories and drawers work. 

However, this is not some patronising guide which never gels beyond the 
end of its own ndse. II also talks about a variety of advanced subjects such as 
creating your own compilation disks, recursive scripts, customising the startup- 
sequence and using Amiga text editors, 

The book is aimed ai Workbench 1.2, 1.3 and 2.x users; there's a separate 
volume for 3,0 {A12Q07A4OO0) owners. 

As with most BSB books, there's free disk available which con- 
tains many example scripts to demonstrate the stuff in the text. 
I£BN# 1 B733QS-OQ-0 

MASTERING AMIGA C 

£19.95 -BSB -0923 894355 

For many tasks, a language such as Basic or even ARexx is just not capable 
of providing the required speed or flexibility. In such cases you need to look ai 
G or machine code. The Amiga's operaling system was written in C, so that 
seems like a logical starting point, 

Although programs written in C are not usually as elegant as those written 
in machine code, they run nearly as. quickly and the language is pot nearly as 
difficult to learn. Even so, you'll need good help to get you on your way. 

Paul Overaa's book offers a reasonable starting place, and although abso- 
lute computer novices will find the going pretty lough, once you have a 
moderate undersianding of AmigaDOS 
you should be able to cope. 

The book deals with iwo C compiling 
systems in particular: the expensive SAS 
C development system, and the public 
domain North C (package (which is 
included on the supplementary disk). It 
comes with specific worked examples 
which can be used with these compilers as 
well as talking in more general terms 
about the language. 

There's no point suggesting that this 
book makes ii easy lo learn C; you'll still 
need patience and intelligence, but this 
simply offers you a good siart. 
IS BN# 1-873308-04-6 



104 




No matter what your interests on the Amiga, there's 
bound to be a book that covers it. If you want to find 
out more about your favourite area of interest, then 
here's a selection of books that'll let you do just that. 

MASTERING AMIGADOS 2 
VOLUME 2 

£19.95 - BSB - 0923 894355 

Whereas Volume 1 is targeted at those people who want to gain or expand 
upon their perhaps limited knowledge, this tome is for these who have a fair 
understanding of the workings of AmigaDOS but who simply require a refer- 
ence source to clarify its parameters. 

It provides a 307 page listing of every single AmigaDOS 1 .2 -2.04 com- 
mand. Each command is shown with 
examples and templates as well as a 
description of when it should be 
used. The page layouts are well 
designed for maximum speed and 
ease of use - very important factors 
when designing a reference book. 

In addition lo the command refer- 
ence, the book also includes five 
detailed appendices which cover 
AmigaDOS error codes, viruses, the 
IFF file format, loe mounflist and the 
structure and capacity of floppy 
disks. 

There can be no doubt that ihis 
book is a valuable companion if you 
intend to use your Amiga as anything 
more Ihgn a games machine. 
ISBNS 1-673308^09-4 



UIJLMlMy 




MASTERING AMIGA 
BEGINNERS 

£19.95 -BSB -0923 894355 

If you're new to computers, the Amiga must seem like a pretty scary beast. 
and the manual that comes with it doesn't do as much as it might to ease your 

trepidation. 

This book is designed to intro- 
duce you gently lo the plelhora of 
subjects that you'll encounter as an 
Amiga owner, ranging from the 
Workbench lo viruses, from setting 
up a printer lo using software, it's all 
here. 

The most important thing about 
the title is the language it uses, and 
in that regard it's generally very 
gogrj. Ifs been written by Phil South 
who has a very good and non-jar- 
gongse way of writing Rather than 
making his book a technical tutorial, 
he takes a much more conversa- 
tional approach which helps to stop it 
from becoming boring. 

IBBN# 1 -873308-03-5 




Books 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



MASTERING AMIGA PRINTERS MASTERING AMIGA SYSTEM 



£1 9.95 -BSB- 0923 894355 



£29.95 ■ BSB - 0923 894355 




Few subjects cause Amiga 
users more consternation 
thai getting their printer to 
work properly. Whilst many 
modern pieces of software 
take this into account, the 
majority of printers are still 
being jjsed with older soft- 
ware, and consequently 
are still not being used to 
their best. 

Mastering Amiga 
Printers covers every type 
of device from dot matrix to 
laser, and teaches you how 
to configure the printer 10 
work wilh your Amiga. It 
covers subjects such as 
printer drivers, printing text 
and graphics and connect- 
ing the printer, lit also goes 
on to more advanced sub- 
jects such controlling your 
printer in Basic, control and 
escape codes and oven 
adjusting vertical and hori- 
zontal spacing. 

To be honest if you only use your printer with 3 single word processor, I his 
title is probably unnecessary, but if you use it with a lot of different packages 
then this book will enable you to finally get the sort of performance 
Tram your printer thai you always hoped it was capable of. {^*^Sk 

ISBN 1-873308-05-1 \^Jfp 



If you're learning to program, regardless of the language you're bound lo have 
discovered that the Amiga is a complicated piece of machinery. Sure it's one of 
the most flexible and friendly home computefs available, but harnessing this 
power in code is no easy task. 

This book aims to help you to understand the big picture so thai you can 
see the way thai the different elements of the operating system (OS) work In 
relation to each other. 

Definitely not a title for the beginner, Amiga System describes the ways that 
you can control and manage the Amiga's multiple elements, and describes 
techniques such as memory management, multi-lasking, libraries and devices. 
It also discusses at lenglh the function and application of many of the custom 
chips including the Witter, 

Demo writers will doubtless be 
pleased to see detailed analysis of 
the copper list, which is used so often 
to provide those rainbow colour bars 
that seem to be a feature of so many 
demos. 

Most of the programming example 
are given in, and relate lo C and this 
is obviously because the Amiga's OS 
is written in the same language. 

Fortunately the information is pro- 
vided within a practical framework so 
that you can easily appreciate the 
benefits of what is being discus-sed, 
so lor example, in the section on the 
Serial port, the potential MIDI uses 
are introduced, and this adds 
rclavence which keeps the text inter- 
esting. 
ISBN JM -673308-06- X 



Paul Overaa 


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MASTERING AMIGA 
ASSEMBLER 

£24.95 - BSB - 0923 894355 



MASTERING AMIGA 
WORKBENCH 2 

£19.95 -BSB -0923 894355 



No Amiga language is as powerful or as difficult to learn as machine code. 
Programming this language is made a little easier by the use of an 'inter- 
preter', a program known as an assembler, into which you can type 
mnemonics which are a tiny bit easier to understand and debug lhan raw num- 
bers. However, the bottom line is that you're going to have to sit down at some 
stage and try to comprehend a language which is more hostile than any olhcr. 

Programming guru Paul Gveraa attempts lo ease your passage wilh his 
latest book, having already successfully written a C Manual. 

Paul talks about the basic concepts that you'll need to grasp in order to 
understand what assembly language is all about, He also describes the archi- 
tecture of the S-9000 chip in some 
detail before going on to describe sim- 
ple programs designed to solve 
specific easy problems. This practical 
approach is useful because il helps 
you to see the language in the context 
that it's most likely to be used. 

The book progresses to explore ever 
more complex; programming concepts 
such as using library routines and how 
to access the custom chips directly, 

Even if you successfully read this 
from cover to cover and understand 
everything, it won't make you a com- 
mercial programmer- only practice 
will do that - but you will understand 
enough to write your own assembly . 
language programs to perform moder- 
ately complex operations. 
ISBN* 1^87330>B-t1-6 




f van if you only play games, you're 
likely to encounter the Amiga 
Workbench sooner or later. For many 
people it is little more lhan a portal, an 
environment that they pass through on 
the way to somelhing else. However, 
Workbench is much more than that, 
and in release 2 Commodore made it 
even more powerful. This book aims to 
show you how to gel the most out of 
(he most frequently accessed Amiga 
environment. 

Not only does il go into detail about 
how the Workbench can be configured 
for your exact requirements, it also 
describes how this configuration 
affects the other programs you use. 

With a detailed step by step 
description of the contents of each 
drawer, and Ihe purpose of the liles 
found; Ihere, to a certain extent this is a glorified replacement For the manual 
you received with your computer. However the book does go into more detail, 
and makes diversions not found in Commodore's offering. 

For example, ihe virus threat is examined and explained and you're given 
unequivocal guidance about how to avoid infection. The book also looks al 
hard drives and tells you how and why to perform regular backups. ■ 

Useful as a tutorial for the beginner and a reference source for the more 
experienced user. A120Q and A4000 owners would be advised to watch out tor 
Maste ring Am iga Workbench 3 , f^^&k 

ISBN** 1-873308-08-6 <^££P 




>> 



105 



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Amiga A1 200 Starter Pack £39.95. isbn: t -8.73309-30-2 

Sure to be Ihe Chnglmas best seller, this bumj»r-value pack includes the Amiga A 120a lo&ieer Guide. Amiga 
At206 Next Steps tn&dw Qmfe and a t-tiout video tape on M20Q bases from Wall Slreet Video, Australia's 
premier training vide* company- Also includes four disks of essential shareware software to help get you going. 

Amiga A1 200 Insider Guide by Bruce Smith. 256 pages, £14.95, ISBN: 1-673306-15-9 

Our NUMBER ONF besl seller from Ihe wafdprocessor of TOP SELLING author Bruce Smith. Thousands ol 
A120G owners hava already gol lo grips with tbeir Amirja with the aid of this superb inttoducliori to the A1200. 
Packed with helpful hinis, tips and usefuJ advice this book is aimed at ihe novice and guarantees to gel you- using 
both Workbench and AmigaDOS wHhoU any fuss. A must for Ghnstmasf 

Amiga A120O Next Steps by Peter Filzpalrit*, E14.9S, ISBN: 1-B73306-24-8 
Now you've corn* to (arms mth your A1200 you're hjohlng tc- improve your techniques and explore, (he many 
possibilities that the machine offers, Afro'ga A12Q0 Nsxl Steps shews you how. It explains in an easy m iqllow 
slyle how lo choose, install and manage a hard drive, how to use MulliView and ArnigaDOS and how lo best 
improve storage and display. It provides an introduction lo video and graphics editing, making music and 
programming, with advice o^ gelling the most from She machine in every<tay use. With Aw disk of PD software. 

Amiga Assembler Insider Guide by Paul Overaa. £14.95, ISBN: 1-673308-27-2 
Do jc-u want lo learn Assembly language but don'l know your Info/Message from your Nutt temrnated string? 
Then Ihe Amiga Assembler frtsteJav Guide is the book for you. II oxplans Ihe concepts behind the processes and 
demystifies the jargon with easy-to-follow worked examples and step-by'Step instructions, Applicable lo all 
Amigas including A600. A 1200, A3000 and A4DQQ, it provides a perfect flying start in Assembler programming. 
Comes wiin a free disk which includes ihe AgBk assembler and aH the programs from iha book 



CREDIT CARD 
HOTLINE 

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- How to order - 

Please complete Bw form befow 

or alernaNvely call our Cred-1 
Card Hctine quoting your name 
and address., credit canj .number 
lis sxpry dale and your daytime 

ielephDne number. 

■A1200 Pack postage £3 (UK) 

First class postage free ^ the UK 

Postage LI per book I Europe) 

E6 par book elsewhere. 



Please send to: Bmee Smith Books Ltd, FHEEPOST 242, PO Bo* 382, Si, Albans, Herts, AL2 3 BR. 

. made payable to Bruce Smith Books Ltd. 



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□ A1200 Suiter Pack' , £39,95 □ MaslBriiiQ Amiga Pfinrera £19.95 

J Arrtga ABOO Insider Guide E14.95 Q Mastering Amiga System £29.95 

3 ArniHga A12(KI Insider Giitde £14 95 LI Mastering Amiga Assembler.. .,£2195 

LI Amiga Al 200 Alert Steps £14.95 Q Mastering Amiga ARera £21,96 

J Assembler Insider Guide £14.95 D Mastering Amiga Beginners £19.95 

G MasiefiBB ftnigaMSJ Vol. 1 ,.121,95 Q Mastering AntpaDQS2 Vol 1.. £21.95 

□ MasEering AnigaOOSl Vol. 2 ..£21 .9fi Q Mastering AniigaDQS2 Vol. 2. ,£t9.95 
LI Mastering Amiga AMDS £19,95 Ll Amiga Gamer's Giiide E14.95 



Books 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



MASTERING AMIGA AMOS MASTERING AMIGA AREXX 



£19.95 -BSB- 0923 894355 



£21.95 -BSB- 0923 894355 



No language has inspired the 
public's imagination in quite 
the way that AMOS has. It 
combines ihe relative simplic- 
ity of Basic with the raw power 
of C and some- cases even 
assembly language, Even so, 
the instruction manuals pro- 
vided with it are quite badly 
written and many would-be 
programmers have fallen at 
the first hurdle, 

Phil South offers a hand to 
get you on your feet. Not only 
does his book cover all ver- 
sions of the program including 
Easy AMOS, AMOS 3D and 
AMOS Pro, it even covers 
some of the PD and supple- 
mentary programs that are 
available. 

As wilh all programming 
books, it starts wilh an 
overview ot both the language ar>d the tools used to program it, but it's not 
long al all before Phil dives in at the deep end describing Procedures, loops, 
variables and other important building blocks of the language. This approach 
works quite well 1 because it means that you can start seeing results quite 
quickly, and thus gain encouragement. 

Although the book is about ihe size of all other BSB titles, it's subdivided 
into zillions of chapters and sub-sections. This is quite handy because it 
means that you can break your lessons down into nice small bite- sized pieces 
- essential when dealing with such a potentially heavy subject. 
ISBN* 1-873308-12-4 




Arexx is like the superglue of serious Amiga programs, it binds them all 
together using a uniform language that lets ihem exchange data and share 
resources. It also lets you automate single programs so lhal multiple complex 
operations can be performed wilh minimal user-input. 

Once again Mr Overaa rears his head, and this time he guides you through 
the wonderful world of Arexx, starting with a took at the strengths of Ihe language 
and ending with a summary of the public domain versions that are available. 

On the pumey we look at the basic components of Ihe language and the 
way that they can be combined to create powerful batch processing senpts, 
Hints on program design 
and documentation conven- 
tions are given so that you 
don't fall into bad habits. 

The subject of debug- 
ging is also examined, with 
tips to ensure that you can 
find and solve even the 
trickiest errors. 

Paul also talks exten- 
sively about inter-program 
communications, with a 
number of example pro- 
grams included to clarify the 
tutorials. 

This is ideal tor anyone 
who keeps buying programs 
which claim Arexx compati- 
bility withoul 
realising why this 
is so special. 
ISBN #1-873308-13-2 




MASTERING AMIGADOS 3 

£21 .95 -BSB -0923 894355 



AMIGA INTERN 

EN/A - COMPUTER MANUALS - 021 706 6000 



Before you can program, or play games or use any software al all, the disk 
operating system has to come into play. This under-rated part of Ihe compuler 
is crucial to many parts of its operation and understanding the way it works will 
help you to take better conirol of your Amiga. 

Despite its title, this book is aimed at all Amiga DOS users, not just those 
who own 3.0 machines. However, ihis is the only title which includes specific 
information about the newest version of Commodore's operating system. 

As with Mastering AmigaDOS 2 Volume 2, Ihis book is primarily a refer- 
ence source, and although you could penhaps use it for learning about 
AmigaDOS commartds f it's 
not really suited tor those 
who have no knowledge of 
AmigaDOS. 

The command summary 
has been expanded from 
307 to 345 pages to 
encompass Ihe extra fea- 
tures of Kickstart 3.0. There 
are also two additional 
appendices, one of which 
deals wilh public screens. 
whilst ihe other lists com- 
modities qualifiers, 

This title is even more 
comprehensive than its pre- 
decessor, and should take 
pride of place in any Amiga 
enthusiast's library. 
ISBN* 
1-B73308-08-6 







Amiga 



The delinitive reference 
book for ail Amiga computers 



$s 



A basic knowledge of the 

Amiga's internal architecture 

is useful to all but the most 

superficial of users, and to 

programmers it's essential- 
Amiga Intern is one of the 

last Amiga titles released by 

Abacus, a publisher once 

renowned tor its catalogue of 

Amiga books, but more 

recently moved on to other 

computers for its revenue. 

This is a shame considering 

the comprensive nature of 

Ihis title, but at least they left 

with a bang, not a whimper. 
The book attempts to act 

as the definitive reference 

wo rk tor all Am iga computers 

(up 10 the 3000). If describes 

the inner workings and func- 
tion of nol only the computer 

but a range of the most popu- 
lar peripherals such as Ihe 

flicker fixer and 63030 accelerators. 

It describes in extensive detail Kickstart 2, OS 20 and Arexx. At all stages 

particular attention is paid to the A3000, and vast sections of ihe book are 

devoted to its physical and software architecture, 

Unfortunately Ihe book was almost immediately made redundant when 

Commodore released their AGA range, but as many users still prefer the 

A30Q0, this is worth considering. 

ISBN* 1-55755-148-0 




dJfc 



» 



107 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



ooks 



AMIGA GAMER'S GUIDE 

£14.99 - BSB - 0923 894355 



» 




^Volume One 




Okay, so il's all very well 

expanding your knowledge 
and becoming an Amiga 
egghead, but you know 
what they say 'All work and 
no play..-'. II you're as seri- 
ous about your games as 
you are about your utilities, 
then this is one tills you 
should be considering, 

Edited by CU's own edi- 
tor Dan Slingsby , the gukte 
offers advice and tips on 
the 'classic' games of all 
time, ranging from Monkey 
Island to Dungeon Master, 
from Speedball to 
Populous. 

It's split inio two. sec- 
lions, the first of which 
occupies the vast majority 
of the book. In the first sec- 
tion detailed solutions and 
playing tips are offered for 
26 of the Amiga's all-time 
hottest games- This section is copiously illustrated with screenshots of the var- 
ious game sections. 

The latter part of ihe book is an A to Z of Amiga cheats and lists every dirty 
trick, password, backdoor code and cack-handed playing tip known, to man. 
Many of these have apparently come directly from the programmers and are 
not available elsewhere.. It you want to get full value from your 
games collection this is an indispensable guide to doing so. 
ISBN* 1^73308-16-7 

A1200 INSIDER GUIDE 

£14.95 - BSB - 0923 894355 

When you've just bought 
a. new computer it can 
seem pretty over-whelm- 
ing, and Commodore's 
manuals are not always 
as helpful as they might 
ba. The Insider Guide is 
an ideal solution. 

Il acts not so much as 
a replacement for the 
Al200's manuals as an 
accompaniment, It does 
cover much of the same 
ground, but doesn't pro- 
fess to go into (he same 
level of detail, What it 
does do is guide you 
Uhrough the essential 
basics of the machine in 
such a way lhal you can 
glean the maximum use- 
ful information with the 
minimum of effort, 

Every so often you'll encounter little boxed oft areas containing special tips 
to help you getlhe most from the subject at hand. 

It covers all aspects of the machine, dwelling mainly upon the Workbench 
and AmigaDOS. It's a relatively inexpensive way of going on a computer 
beginner's crash course. Concise, yet entertaining. 
ISBN#1B7W08159 



MAKING SENSE OF ENGLISH 
IN COMPUTERS 

£5.99 - WHSMITHS 





To those who are not used lo it, the vocabulary 
of the computer world is as alien as anything 
spoken on another continent, There are hun- 
dreds of words which have an infuriating ly 
familiar feel to them yet which seem to appear 
in totally unexpected contexts. No longer is a 
RAM a male sheep, any more than Kermil is a 
green frog from the muppels. A RAM, it turns 
out, is a unit of memory, whilst kermil is actu- 
ally a modem transfer protocol, 

If you wan! to understand the language of 
the future, you can't just read on in the hope 
that it'll all become clear. Isn't it worth investing 
a measly six quid for a book which not only 
explodes the acronyms and endless abbrevia- 
tions, but gives down to earth descriptions of 
their meanings in language which, if not quite 
Queen's English, is certainly ctoS0l \^fc. 

than that spoken by computer addicts"' ^JJp 

ISBN#0-55O-l805Q-8 



JARGON EXPLAINED! 

AmigaDOS - Amiga Disk Operating System - The language that is used to 

control all operations involving disks, be ihey hard disks, lloppy disks or 
RAM disks. All reading and writing is done using AmigaDOS- 

Assembler - A program for the creation of machine code programs. An 
assembler lets you enler programs as a series ol letter codes representing 
I Un actions. These codes are then compiled into pure numeric machine 
code- 
Basic - A relatively simple programming language originally created as an 
aid to teach students about the inner workings of computers. Basic pro- 
grams tend to be slow and unsophisticated compared lo other languages, 

c The language in which the Amiga's operating system is written. Less 
complex than machine cede or assembly language bul harder than Basic 
fttid more powerful. 

Compilation Disk ■ A disk that contains more than one program on it, 

Compiler - Software for converting source code into machine (or object) 
code 

Jargonese • An imaginary language made up of all the rolten unintelligi- 
ble) technical words in a computer user's vocabulary. 

Source Code A program written in a specific language. Source code 

needs to be converted into object or machine code before it can be run by 

the computer, 

Workbench - The Amiga's software interface to othw programs. Think of it 

liko a tool rack thai holds the other tools. 

Virus - A program ihal has been created by a malicious person and which 
is designed to move from the computer's memory to any unprotected 
disks, usually damaging or destroying dam on each disk It 'infects'. 



ADDRESSES 

Computer Manuals 

50 James Road 

Tysetey 

Birmingham 

B11 2BA 

Tel: 021 706 6000 

I ax 021 706 33*01 



BSB (Bruce Smith Books) 

TO Box 382 

St Albans 

lli"ifordshire 

AL2 3JD 

Tel: 0923 894366 

Fax: 0923 694366 



lOS 



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LPI200 with FLASH ROM. HP LaserJet lif compatible, me LP1ZQO 
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u*SS a laser tight source to produce the most accurate and intense 
printed images si a range ol print resolutions up to 400dpi. A fait 
efficient processor and engine, plus a straight paper path design 
allows printing at a full 6 pages per minute. The 2Mb RAM version 
prints a full A4 page of ftwf or graphics at MQdpi. Using standard 
resident fonts and trie alternate controller firmware Supplied, it 
can atso print an A4 page of text or AS page of graphics 8t 
400dpi anti, using the Windows driver supplied, an 
A4 page of text 

at 40Qdpi from 
Windows 3.1. .; 




PLAIN PAPER 
FAX OPTION 



SHOWN WITH 
UM'.'EHSAL FEEDER 
TOP TRAV iWnCHW.e«tfiAi 

The 1Mb RAM version can print a 

full A4 page of graphics at 400 dpi and makes 

full use of the LPlSOO's 400 dpi printing capabilities, such 

as using Microsoft Windows fonts. Unique additional standard 

features inciude FLASH ROM 'future proof technology and LA YOUT • a 
powerful document description language. The LP120O's unique interna.! 
FLASH ROM, which httkfs the printer controller firmware, can easily be 
updated as new developments in technology occur. This protects the 
investment ycu make in buying a Ricoh LP1 #00. Other manutsctuf &$ 
would require you to buy a new printer! Internal FLASH ROM and 
industry standard FLASH ROM PCMCIA cards can also be used to 
permanently store fonts, macros, graphics and extra emulations- Again, 
unlike the competition, the LP12Q0 Tnciludes LAYOUT, a powerful and 
intuitive document description language as 
standard. This offers unique opportunities to 
develop custom made printing systems. 
Forms and document templates can be 
designed complete with togcs and stored 
electronically in the LPl200's FLASH ROM. 
alleviating the need for pre-prlnted forms! 

The LPI20Q comes with a TOO sheet At 
paper tray as standard- An optional universal 
feeder automatically Feeds up To )5Q sheers 
of paper fup to I69gsm). 15 envelopes, 
transparencies and labels- 



CONSUMABLES + ACCESSORIES 



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6 PAGES PER MINUTE 
2Mb RAM AS STANDARD 

Upgrade to 4ur, RAM unly fS5."'7 - see below 

PCLS - ncHP-GL/2 

With jscatabne fen^s tTnor vocior graphics 

SHARP EDGED PRINTING 

flreafr FIAL fFine Image Algorithm) enhances resolution 

400dpi RESOLUTION 

(Default res. - 300dpi. Will address 2O0, 24D& 400dpi) 

UNIQUE FLASH ROM 

For controller upgrade and storage 

PCMCIA CARD SLOT fflpw^B^, 

For pragramma&e FLASH POM cards 

EXPANSION BOARD SLOT 

F$r improved connectivity eg. Coax/Twinax, PC-LAN etc 
LAYOUT Dut-wnnjnt description Language 

SERIAL + PARALLEL PORTS 
1 YEAR ON-SITE WARRANTY 

AAautt wonting day response 



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AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 Desk Top Publishing 



DESK TOP PUBLISHING 




No longer do you have to pay commercial printers 
great wads of your hard earned cash to produce and 
print your documents. The Amiga is more than capa- 
ble of professional results. 



Although the Apple Macintosh 
still reigns supreme as THE 
desk top publishing (DTP) 
computer, there is absolutely 
nothing lhat can compete with the 
Amiga in terms of value for money. 
and the PCs and STs }ust fait on their 
backs kicking their little legs in the air 
when it comes lo software. 

The Amiga has a iong history in 
the DTP market, but nowadays the 
battle is being slugged out between 
two main companies: Softlogik and 
Gold Disk, both of whom regularly 
update their software. 



PROFESSIONAL PAGE 4.0 

£199 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



t f»»l«ft*l Fw WT1B1M3 Gal* jHi* Inc. i_ tlltmUd ,~~~ 



ProPage 

4 
CU Amiga 




mm 



^a 



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□ 



1 



tace, and on ARexx machines it also 
offers additional tools known as 
Geni.es, which are basically short 
mouse selectable programs which 
perform specific operations on your 
document, or part ot it. 

LOURS OF THE 




On AGA machines you can view doc- 
uments in up to 256 colours, 
although additional colours tend to 
delay the screen updates exponen- 
tially. Most likely, you're going to 
continue to work in wireframe 
menocrome mode tor maximum 
speed. One big advantage on AGA 
machines is the lact thai when 
choosing colours for text and lines, 
etc, the pantone palette is now much 
more accurately represented without 
relying go heavily upon shading, This 
is useful because these are the 
colours used in the commercial prinl- 

PO.Cllr..ii.'..'*-{ 



In the constant war lor supremacy in 
ihe Amiga DTP scene, Pro Pageh&s 
always managed to keep ahead of its 
rivals. Time to see if that's still true. 
Professional Page comes from 
Gold Disk, a company who have 
been producing Amiga DTP pack- 

110 



ages for almost as long as there 
have been Arnigas. The program has 
been constantly upgraded, and lends 
to appeal very much to DTP purists 
who like everything So be very pre- 
cise. 

It has a very elegant usef-inier- 




With packages from either com- 
pany you could easily create an 
entire magazine, or a single page 
flyer, and these could include 24-bit 
graphics, structured drawings, bit- 
mapped clip art and a variety ot 
fonts. You can output to the hum- 
blest home printer, or if you have Ihe 
money you tan lake your work to an 
output bureau and have it commer- 
cially printed. So let's take a look at 
the choices... 



«» ft V flt W W»WWHr^S 



CB Makes a Card 
toith |f>ro 4?agc 




Profession*! Pmpthw long enjoyed a reputa- 
tion iis I In: best Amiga DTP package, but 
version 4 is samewhal unstable and 
Pageatream really gives It m run tot it* money. 

ing industry. 

Pro Page supports facing pages, 
and unlike its rival either page can be 
edited. You can also place graphics 
across pages to create double page 
spreads; essential if you want to cre- 
ate commercial magazines. 

FARTY FONTS 

Although the program supports both 
Compugraphic and Adobe typefaces, 
the latter can only be used after con- 
version with the Font Manager 
program provided- However, this 
causes problems because the Font 
Manager often fails to fully convert 

You can view up to 256 colours on-screen 
wtiiuh misns thv Pantone palette can be rep* e- 
Mfilfrd more accurately. 



esk Top Publishing amiga buyers guide 94 



PAGESEnER 3 



£49.99 - MERIDIAN 
081 543 3500 



DISTRIBUTION 



! hTjinm mi. i 



V: '.Tf" t "f;'.lr! 1 



New Laser Times 



■ "^-** ^■■4lf~ ft*** P ■ «Tka ^bJ ■_ .■ lis. ■_>*. 

■ takv M nr|M ii[M»ai#. H, J< 



_ * W»— .teML^.U «ft^ > w ^— U]. ud [rill 

* *■ ■■ — 4 WOV II —J- Mty r*M 4 m>«-^- 

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Far mosl people, P e aesBtter -5 la all they'll 
rvijr ngga in larms ol des* (op publishing 
JofftwnnS As yc u can see, II «an p rariuce per- 
feclly acceptable pages. 

If you want to get into DTP but you 
don't have much money so gel 
started, Page$$tter 3 offers superb 
value, and will probably satisfy the 
needs of most home users. 

As Itie specifications for Amiga 
DTP packages increase, so does the 
minimum machine on which you can 
run them, Pro Fags needs a couple 
of megs of FAM and a hard drive, 
and although Pagastream will run in 



one meg with only an extra floppy, 
you're not really going to get much 
use our of it in such a configuration. 
Pagesetter 3 has been specifically 
designed lor the smaller user, and 
runs perfectly well in a one meg, two 
drive machine. Of course, it will hap- 
pily work with a more powerful 
machine, and you're slill going lo run 
out of memory if you start to design 
large documents, or those contain- 
ing lots of fonts and graphics. 

Pageseiterls nol aimed at profes- 
sional or semi-professional users, but 
for the enthusiastic home user it's 
exceptionally good, ottering features 
not found in DTP packages cost ng ten 
limes as much on the PC. It's basically 
a slightly eul-down version of 
Professional Page 2. 0, a product which 
was sliJI receiving very favourable 
reviews a year and a half ago. 

The program consists of three 
elements: Article Editor (AXE) for 
editing text. Graphics Editor [GrE) 
for editing graphics, Pagesetter for 
designing page layouts, Pagesetter 
is the main program, ar>d it allows 
you to access the other two ele- 
ments which are hoi linked to it, Each 



of these elements is actually a sepa- 
rate program, but by making them 
accessible from Pagesatter means 
thai you can immediately edit bit 
mapped graphics in a pseudo art 
package, or alter and spell check 
large amounts of text in the cut- 
down word processor. The changes 
you make will then be instantly made 
to your DTP document without need- 
ing to reload ihe various sections. 

Unlike previous version of the 
program. Pagasatter 3 supports 
colour printing. On Ihe A120Q and 
A4000 you can view your work in up 
to 256 colours, although owners of 
olher machines will have to make do 
with 2-4 colour previews instead. 
Regardless otthe machine being 
used. Pacesetter wif I import any IFF 
oil -map, including those created on 
AGA machines, and even HAM and 
24-bit images. This is useful 
because if you have a decent colour 
printer you can output images that 
you can't even view' 

The program also lets you import 
structured clip art such as that cre- 
ated by Professional Draw. Better 
yet, 1 20 pieces of scalable clip art 
are included, and these would previ- 
ously have cost more on their own 
than ihis complete package. 

It supports scaJable oompugraphic 
typefaces, and there's even a ulilily 

The program comes with Graphics Editor. ;i 

cut-down art pttkigv for raloucttlng bl1- 

riiuppecUlip art, etc. 



provided to convert Adobe Type 1 
typefaces into Uie required format. 

It comes with the same user- 
triendly interface that has made Pro 
Page so popuiar, and the manual, as 
you might expect, is excellent. 

CONCLUSION 

It s very hard Mo fault Pagesetter 3 
given its extraordinarily low price. 
Sure i! could have more features, 
but with word processors costing as 
much as £1 29 nowadays, this pro- 
gram looks simply incredible. 
Whether you're putting together club 
newsletters, doing your homework, 
producing adverts or any of a thou- 
sand DTP jobs. Pagesatt&r 3 is a 
great starting place, and one from 
which you're unlikely to have to 
upgrade unless you are a profes- 
sional. 



IfntrHfJj BWr lyi'M-Tf ■ ' ."~^ , "~^V*' 



New Laser Times 



l> W n M9fp F*MH^ ] 



*■■"■!■» TV pfetto t lij pfck^T 

a h u ifet sri a i iin ■■. ~ 

!■■!■ trujJJl. fe p*kk*a| 3M 

•*r*A ki<UMltiFViJi il-pli jm' ■■!!■ ME-BUKU U*| 

u* tla -hi hi BMU IHbjIHM t±\e4 k .pp "-\ >u jfruuk, 

-* »*■ ■»■ ■ -r n**r * bi omkxr *^ tm r *—. +-* i 

■r KMf Mm**) ^f^ana rtkMi ib. mm ■* *%p* U V* ilipi|) 

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complicated fonts that Pagesiream 
can handle in their native formal, 
Furthermore, because the program 
only uses fonts stored in the 
assigned CG fonts drawer, the num- 
oerof fonts you have available 
(without lots ol messing about) is 
limited 10 the size ol your disk gr 
hard drive. 

Furthermore,, the range of styles 
that can be applied to a font is really 
very unimaginative, wilh shadow and 
outline being the most exciting 
Options. 

Fortunately, despite these limita- 
tions (whtch only tend to effect 
headlines anyway), the program has 
wonderful text handling, and offers 
automatic import of text frgm every 
major word processor on the Amiga 
including Scribble!, Word Parted 
and even a few PC programs. 

II you don't own a word proces- 
sor, not to worn/, the program is 
su potted with the same Article Editor 



:<»lect Text Fl ] her 




ExcfllTance! 
KindHorrJs 

PnoHrtte 
FrowHr i to 
Scribble* 
TixtCrftft 
TsxtCraf tPlus 
TransHr i t»-AE 
HordPerfoct 4 



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8 



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CU Makes a Card 
with Fro Page 




Alhough you esn'1 appJy rnany I nlerealmg 
*WI»» Id your fonts, you e*n fill tham in the 
pallern jnd colour ol your choice. 

included wilh Pagasetier 3, so not 
only do you have a very capable 
word processor, but you also have a 
comprehensive spelling checker too. 
In fact, Article Editor is a cut-down 
version rjf Trans Write, and can be 
used as a stand alone program 
when you simply need lo bang out a 
few words quickly, 

GRAPHIC GENIUS 

When ii comes to graphics. Pro 
Page is even more versatile. Of 
course, it imports every IFF format 
under the sun. from mono -chrome 
bitmaps up to 24 -bit pictures and rl 
also supports all ihe major formats 
on ofher computers too. so you can 
just as easily import a GIF picture 
from a Mac. a PCX, BMP or TIFF file 
from a PC or even Encapsulated 
Postscript files. Bui it doesn't stop 
there; |he program handles mono 



and colour structured drawings cre- 
ated on ail known Amiga packages, 
it also handles Adobe Illustrator and 
Freehand dies, so you can exghange 
graphics with (he most popular DTP 
software in the world 

The range ol page layout tools is 
also very impressive, ensuring that 
even the mosl demanding of jobs 
can be performed quickly and with 
micron precision, literally! 

CONCLUSION 

Professional Page is a superb desk 
top publishing package beyond any 
doubt. However, in their rush lo beat 
Softlogik to an AGA release, it 
seems that Gold Disk were less thor- 
ough than usual in debugging their 
software, and this has resulted in a 
couple ol minor but persistent and 
irritating faults. If the fon| handling 
were better, this would still be the 
pinnacle of Amiga DTP software, but 
it isn't, and it's nol. 

I've been a very loyal Pro Page 
user for over live years, but even I'm 
beginning to wonder it I can make 



Unit*. Ql«rt 
■ blH-r QU«" 
Lj9rH; Ol**" 

□ 'm,»|. In (ii'M 

f butllM.i [Jcvl 


QFLt* (CU 

:Ji'i" Qnv* #ch 
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i"oi Anal* *ktri|i(^^~ 


: iff J 


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The accuracy with with which you can design 
layoutf ili oris Pro Page a advanlsg**. 



Spool's no Fool! 

When it earnest" priming. DIP programs: 
can be real dogs, The trouble is. they use 
scalable foots lor maximum quality, and 
each pap can contain masses of pictures 
too, The prng rams always print el the besl 
possible qua my which means thai even 
del matrix owners can get great looking 
pag«5. (J ultimately the casi lrjr such 
slick results is time, wilii pages taking as 
long as fifteen minutes -and even more la 
print 

Now in itself Ihis is bad enough, but 
tine real problem is the lad Ihal you can't 
actually do any inure work while the pro- 
gram is priming. Or at leasl not unless you 
own Pro Page 4, which is supplied wilh a 
nifty print spun I program which you can 
use lo print a Document while you carry on 
wilh your wort. 

Belter yel. you can also use the pro- 
gram In handle printing lor any olher 
Amiga application that lets you specily a 
printer device. 

II ya u have muJJ iple print jobs , H will 
also deal with those, qiuei ny Ihem up and 
priming when it gels time. 




Thank* to Pro Spool, you don't haw* to 
slop work |us1 because your printer's 
working. 



amiga buyer s guide 94 Desk Top Publishing 



PAGESTREAM 2.2 

£99.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 



5433500 



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™^ Pa**, *i.b Pn^tr^^ly IM oMy «**<«■ objtel h. r*n«te. *ft*h help* to 
keep. Ihe scr«<i ibhi emtlarntl, 



If you prefer a less formal approach 
to Desk Top Publishing, perhaps 
PageSlream 22 is Ihe one lor you. 
The interlace is clear and pleas- 
ant to use; the latest release now 



conforms more closely to Workbench 
2 styling. You can run PageSiream in 
interlace or non-inlerlace, on a cus- 
tom or Workbench screen, with the 
tool palette on the lert or right of the 



screen, and in two, four, eight or six- 
teen colours; though on an 
unaccelerated machine the use of 
more itian four colours makes screen 
refresh rate rather sluggish. Trie tour 
colour option is perfectly acceptable 
lor normal use and causes no real 
refresh problems. 

FRIENDLY TEXT 

The program opens with a com- 
pletely blank page onto which you 
can import graphics, create a column 
or columns to receive text previously 
prepared on a wordprocessor, or, 
unlike Pro Page, you can type 
straight onto the screen. This pro- 
duces a Iwt object" (perhaps a title 
or headline), which can then be 
manipulated just like a graphic, 
including the ability to drag, rotate, 
slant, iwisl and manually resize it. 
This can result in so-called "bastard" 
point sizes, where the height and 
width of the typeface are different. 
Traditional typographers would prob- 
ably dislike this feature, claiming that 
a font is designed to be seen only in 
its ongiinal proportions, but some- 
times it might be just what you need 
to fit a headline precisely into the 
area you want it to fill. 

Only the currently selected ele- 
ments are provided with sizing 
handles, leading to an uncluttered 
screen and showing you instantly 
which objects are active, To enable 
you to line up objects more precisely 



PROFESSIONAL DRAW 3.0 

£129.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION^ 543 3500_ 

p--=™~^ffiffiaE22S2lEdH nil \T = 




*ri-*" ■" 





L ■ 

Pro Oww Is Ihe Weal wtfiflanlon lor Pro P*S B 
with rjnrarw of cotaur Clips such e* Ihls ema- 
il you want to pep up your pages, a 
structured drawing package offers 
graphics which always look good no 
matter what size they're printed at. 
If you've ever paid attention to 
magazine layout, you can't have 
failed to notice what a crucial role 



unto** you tilvt a 3.0 Amiga. It epmaa -upplted 



graphics play. Of course in a profes- 
sional environment, photograph play 
the most significant role, but even il 
you don't own a scanner, there's no 
reason for your pages to look lifeless. 
Professional Draw helps you cre- 
ate structured drawings, in other 



Prntwrtlonal Dr«« supports 24-bH colour grad- 
uation, although obviously IHb results cjhi only 
t™ slewed In all MiBlr glory wll» a oec-nt colour 
printer.] 

words filled line drawings which can 
be enlarged or reduced with no loss 
of quality. 

You can either draw these Irom 
scratch or use a program called 
Trace to convert ordinary bit-maps 
into structured drawings. Once 
you've created a drawing it can be 
printed directly from within the pro- 
gram, or saved as a clip for importing 
into your tavourite DTP package. 

Because Pro Draw has been cre- 
ated by Gold Disk, the program can 
be hot linked to Pro Page, so that 
clips can be exported directly to a. 
document. 



Th* program letft yOUi view double page 
spreads, but the pages ali» have to be edited 
lrjdlviChJ«lly\ 

than is possible by eye, Snap to Grid 
and Snap to Guide oplions are avail- 
able, with the option of measuring 
the grid in inches, centimetres or 
points: the grid spacing can be 
selected from one of the twelve sup- 
plied, or can be user-delined. The 
optional rulers have been improved 
both in accuracy and readability. 

STUPID DPS 

Double page spreads can be viewed, 
but editing can only be performed on 
the left-hand page. To swap ele- 
ments between pages you have to 
cut and paste, as it isn't possible to 
just drag an element from one page 
to anolher. Text flow around graphics 
is well supported, allowing words to 



The program is supplied with a 
variety oi drawing tools to make your 
life easier including line, rectangle 
and circle tools,. However, the pro- 
gram's strength lies in the special 
effects it can perform- Things like 
alignirvg text with, complex curves so 
that it tollews them exactly. It also 
offers a selection of graduated lill 
patterns, which are printed in 24-bit 
colour to give the smooth gradients 
possible in your documents, 

If you preler to use somebody 
else's work, ttiere's a whole disk full 
ol lull colour structured dips 
included. 

CONCLUSION 

Pro Draw is a very nice piece Of soft- 
ware, and although il looks a lad 
plain compared to newer rivals, it 
more than serves my requirements, 

and unless you are very demanding, 
it'll serve yours too. Mot exactly a 




The program"* rarnpr*henalv# lent alignment 
options arc one ol ils grea1»sl slnanglha. 



112 



Desk Top Publishing amiga buyers guide 94 



r 



til ►■■:■■ 






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r inn 



Pdlt IVI 



FlnS^T 



flit WiwiiT . . I 



rrMTirmiiriinfi 

I! [ 
i P 

i is 



t1»m * 



Not only does 
Pagetteam have 
Ihr must flexible 

fQFIt handling Qui 

or tht packages 
reviewed here, 
l>"1 it»lst»lets 
you apply mora 

slyiBS ta text 
Wife hV»«n the 
ierem 



Z>7P Wars 

ProPagesnti PsgeStream have con- 
stantly vied forltiE lille of Best Amiga 
DTP Program. H's ireiy "flush down to the 
way you like to work it to which you'll 
preler. 01 course il yau don't dave 3 hard 
drive, the c lid ice is already made for 
you. as current versions ol Pto Page 
cannot be used without one: PageStream 
2.2 will run from Happy disk. Ihnugti nal- 
urall-y itiis will prove a lillle 
cumbersome. The minimum memory 
requirement is 1Mb. though Ihis It 
frankly inadequate lor all bill the sim- 
plest documents. Serious DTP workers 
wilt find Utey need more lite lour or live 
megabytes to avoid problems. 



appear underneath, all found or to 
either side of a picture; it can also 
follow the edges of an irregularly 
shaped objecl. Columns of text are 
easily linked, allowing your text to 
How from one column to another, at 
any point in your document. 

PageStream can apply many 
styles to your text, not only ihe usual 
italics, underline and bold, bui also 
shadow, backslant, light, reverse (i.e. 
white on black), outline, double under- 
line, and the rather less useful 
strikerjhru, upside down and mirror, 
Pro Page users can only look pn in 
envy at many of these styles as 
they're not supported in their package. 



Text can be in any colour, on any 

colour background, and (if you're 
using a bold enough typeface for it lo 
show) one of many fill patterns, 
including a user-definable pattern, 
can be added. Compugraphic fonts 
can be sized from 0.01 to appro*. 600 
points, and Soft-Logik and PostScript 
fonts from 0.01 to 163,000 poinls; so 
next time you need lo knock cut a 
newsletter the size of Europe you'll 
have no problems! 

DRAWING TOOLS 

Structured drawing tools are> pro- 
vided, so adding neat boxes or 
frames is extremely simple. Line 
styles can be applied to all structured 

shapes, with a choree of eight line 
widths, seven styles (various combi- 
nations of dols and dashes) and one 
user-definable style. Ends of lines 
can be square, bracket-shaped or 
arrowheads, and line widths from 
0.01 to €55 poinls can be produced. 

Pnnter support is excellent, with 
drivers lor dozens of printers provided, 
including the popular Canon bubblejet 
and HP. Deskjet ranges. PageStream 
overrides your Workbench 
Preferences and printer DIP switch 
sellings to produce the best print reso- 
lution possible. Crop marks are 
available for use on any printer. 
PostScript users are well catered lor 
with the new improved PostScript 
driver, with the ability to include slur 




The prog* am offer* wry pood support for all 
graphics tarmals, but mi* is ralrur let down by 
lis reslriclsd screen palelle. 

gauges, colour strips, registration 
marks, and frequency and screen 
angle lor colour separations. An rnter- 
esting new driver has been provided - 
you can now outpui to a plotter or sign 
cutter should you have access to one, 
HotLinks support is provided, . 
enabling easy transfer of information 
to other HotLinks compatible pro- 
grams, such as SoftLogik's Art 
Expressions structured drawing 
package, BME bitmap editor, and 
PageUner word processor. 

CONCLUSION 

PageStream 2.2 is an admirable pro- 
gram, perhaps better suited to the 
more experimental and "creative" atti- 
tude lo page design than Ihe slightly 
more iradilional Professional Page. 
Any Amiga with 1 meg 
RAM and 2 floppy 
drives- 



ART EXPRESSION TYPESMITH 

£199.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 £169.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



Brand loyalty is a natural enough feeling, and if you own Pag&Settsr, you may well 
preler to use Ant Expression for creating structured drawings ralher than Pro Draw, 

The two programs are very similar, and if price were no object, it would be 
lough to choose between them. Like its rival. Expression provides a full selee- 
lion of drawing tools to help you create structured drawings that will print at the 
maximum resolution your printer is capable of, 

By default the program saves images in Encapsulated Postscript Formal 
(EPSF), which makes them far more portable than Pro Draw dips, which are 
only used on the Amiga. Strangely enough. Expression cant load EPSF files, 
but plans are afoot lo change that in future versions. 

Il doesn't offer the easy-to-use gradient fills of it rival, but using the blend 
feature you can create ihe same effect, as well as many lhat Pro Draw isn't 
capable of. The only trouble is, his feature is trickier to use and lakes a white 
to gel used to. 

One unique option that Art Expression does have is (he ability to conform 
any objecl to a predefined shape. Superficially this is useful for simple per- 
spective effects, but with imagination you can turn it to far more sophisticated 
uses such as simulating reflections on spheres and so on. 

CONCLUSION 

Art Expression is a very powerful structured drawing program and ideal 

as a companion lor Pag$stream. it's significantly more expensive than 

Pro Draw, and for this reason you 

ought to make a detailed evaluation 

of exactly what you want from the 

package before forking out the 

extra £70. 

Requires Kickstart 1.3 or higher 

and 2m b RAM and two floppy 

drives or a hard drive. 




An L»pirx.:im (tlsc provides ihe option to align 
1ex1 with a treehand line, 




Since the release of the 2.0 Amiga*, 
scalable fonts have increased in popu- 
larity dramatically. Used in an art or 
DTP package, they offer flexibility and 
high quality. Typesmith is still the only 
worthwhile program for creating your 
own typefaces, 

The program works almost exactly 
like a structured drawing package, 
using mathematical definitions of 
shapes rather than bit-mapped objects, 
However, it also comes with compre- 
hensive facilities geared towards the 
very demanding requirements of 
designing structured fonts, Despite Ihe 
complexity of ihe subject, Typesmith 
comes with what is probably the best 
manual I've ever seen, and this makes 
learning to use it quite easy. 

The program is capable of importing 
and exporting fonts in all major formats, 

so you can not only use it lo convert between Amiga formats, but you can even 
use PC and Mac fonts as well. 

CONCLUSION 

Although IVe never seen comparable programs on the Mac, I'm told that 
Typesmith is superior to programs costing many times as much, I don't know 
whether lhai's true, but I do know that Soft Logik have set an extremely high 
standard lor anyone to match if they hope to compete in the same 
market. £T^h 

Requires Kickstart 3, 2mb of RAM and 2 floppy drives or a ^^jp 
hard drive. 



113 



Typpsmrrri is the only structured "on1 
designer and converter available la English 
speaking Amiga aunert, Ju*t is will It's so 
dunned goad than! 




OMEGA PRO J E 

? 0942-682203/4/5 
FAX 0942 - 682206 



(EUROPE) LTD 
OMEGA HOUSE 
83 RAILWAY ROAD 
LEIGH, LANGS 

WN7 4AD 




CSA 12 GAUGE 

The only board available that gives the A1200 user TOTAL flexi- 
bility. Fits into trapdoor and offers a SOMhz 68030 MMU, option- 
al 50Mhz 68882 Co-Pro, up to 32 megabytes of 32 bit ram, and 
SCSI 1 & 2 interface, yes SCSI as well as STANDARD. 
With an Amiga Format verdict of 89% they said 

"ADDS SOME SERIOUS POWER TO YOUR AMIGA . 1 200 . 

12 GAUGE Ok /no FPU £499.99 

1 2 GAUGE 1 meg /no FPU £549. 99 

1 2 GAUGE 4 meg / no FPU f§S oo 

12 GAUGE 8 meg / no FPU £799.99 

ADD £199.00 for SOMhz Co-Pro 
BEWARE OF GREY IMPORTS. WE ARE CSA'S ONLY OFFICIAL UK DIS- 
TRIBUTOR. NOW BEING USED BY THE WORLDS LEADING 

PROGRAMMERS 



'EOAUSTS IN HIGH TECH AMIGA HARDWARE FOR 
OVER 7 YEARS, OFFERING YOU THE BEST POST & 
AFTER SALES SERVICE THAT YOU CAN GET IN THIS 
FIELD IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A PRODUCT THAT 
15 NOT ADVERTISED HERE THEN GIVE US A CALL 
AND FIND OUT JUST HOW GOOD WE ARE. 
WE ACCEPT PAYMENT BY MOST CREDIT CARDS and 
DEBIT CARDS, CHEQUES, P.O's and we even accept 
CASH 

" ALL PRICES ARE INCLUSIVE OF VAT 



CSA DERRINGER 

CSA'S DERRINGER is the BEST 030 
processor accelerator for itie Amiga 
500/ 500+/ 1500/2000, This board has o 
25Mhz 68030 MMU clocked at 25Mhz, 25Mhz 
Co-Pro, and the ability to add up to 32 meg of 
32 bit memory using STANDARD simms, 
SOMhz version ALSO AVAILABLE 



DERRINGER + IMeg 
DERRINGER + 4Meg 
DERRINGER + 8Meg 
25Mhz Co-Pro adcT 
SOMhz Co-Pro add 



£349.99 
£599.99 
£699.99 
£149.00 
£199.00 



BEWARE OF GREY IMPORTS- WE ARE CSAs 
loNLY OFFICIAL UK DISTRIBUTOR 



A 1200 

A 1 200 Standalone £299-99 
Al 200 + 20 MB £379.99 
Al 200 + 60 MB £459-99 
A12O0 + 85MB £519.99 
A1200+.127MB £549.99 
Al 200 + 205 MB £629.99 



A400O/030 

A4000 + 80/2 £ 949.99 

A4000 + 120/2 £1049.99 

A4000 +210/2 £1159,99 

Other configurations available 

CALL FOR PRICES 

LIMITED AVAILABILITY AT THESE PRICES 



£299.99 
£199.99 

£79.99 
£ P.O.A. 

£P.OA 
£199.99 



flULTI - 

2 EXTRA Serial ports & 
2 EXTRA Parallel port 
for AMIGA 1500 

£179.99 

Ideal for BBS 





.MEMORY 

la meg SIMM - 32 
L meg SIMM -32 
ll meg SIMM -32 
1 1 meg SIMM - 8 
|4 meg SIMM - 8 
1 4 Meg SC ZIPS 

W^RENOnUS^NOTrTER FACELESS MAIL ORDER COMPANY. IF YOU PREFER 
NOT TO SHOP BY MAIL ORDER THEN WE WELCOME YOU TO COME IN TO OUR 
SHOP PREMISES. REMEMBER WE ARE HERE TO HELP YOU. 



A4000/040 

A4000 + 80/6 £ 1 899.99 

A4000+ 120/6 £1999.99 

A4000 + 210/6 £2099.99 

Other conf iguratiom available 

CALL FOR PRICES 

LIMITED AVAILABILITY AT THESE PftlCES 

HARD DRIVES 

AMIGA 600/ 1 20O 60 meg, 
1 20 meg, 1 70 meg, 

40 i 

POA 

AU ABOVE DfitVIS AM TWO AND HAU INCH 
AND INCLUDE CABLI AND SOFTWARE 



A500 HARD DISK 

40 meg + upto 8 meg ram 

199.99 

SO meg 4- upto 8 meg ram 

249.99 

210 meg + upto 8 meg ram 

399.99 



, SOUND ENHANCER PLUS 

|This product is DESIGNED & BUILT by ourselves and the post 2.5 
I years have seen thousands of units sold to very satisfied cus- 
Ifomers. We are so sure thai YOU will be amazed at the difference 
I the SOUND ENHANCER PLUS makes to the sound of your AMIGA 
that we are offering a NO QUIBBLE MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. 

"THE DIFFERENCE 15 LIKE OPENING A DOOR" - A.U.I 

"SHOULD WIN A SOUND INNOVATION AWARD" - SHOPPER 
"THE EASIEST & MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO IMPROVE 

YOUR AMIGA' s SOUND" - CU AMIGA 



ONLY £39.99 



What can you lose I 

if you don't like it J 

your MONEY BACKl 



SOUND TRAP 3 
KITS 

The Sound Trap 3 Sampler as used by the 
PROFESSIONALS is now available in KIT form for 
ALL those ELECTRONIC/ AMIGA entbusiasb. 
The KIT is VERY EASY to build so much that very lillle 
experience is required- So long as you can use a sol- 
dering iron you con build ihis project. 

ONLY £19.99 

AND if you can't gel it going we offer a get you 
going service 



Desk Top Publishing amiga buyer s guide 94 



EPSON GT 6500 
SCANNER 

£930 - VISOAL PRODUCTS - 0494 890601 




Although there are loads ol scanners 
available nowadays, lot true 24-bit 

quality Epson still hold all the cards. 

Although the popularity of desk 
top publishing has meant that there 
are numerous reasonably priced 
hand scanners available, if you want 
to scan up lo A4 size in a full 1 6.6 
million colours, you're going to have 
lo look at a flatbed scanner, The 
Epson range have long been the dar- 
lings of She Amiga world and the GT 
6500 shows why. 

With a maximum resolution of up 
to 600 dots per inch (DPI) it scans at 
three times the resolution of the best 
colour hand scanner, but to put that 
in context, you're very unlikely to 
need more than 400 DPI in any case, 
What you are going to appreciate 
however, is the scanner's full 24-bit 
colour resolution, which means that 
you can use its scanned images in a 
professional printing environment - in 
fact CU Amiga uses ihis scanner to 
digitise Itie photos used in the maga- 
zine. 

It comes with good software, but 
is even better if controlled via the 
dedicated Art Department 
Profess ional driver, tmags FXalso 
directly supports this scanner. 



but it's about six times as fast as the 
redundant El 50,000 scanner we 
have in the offices- A transparency 
attachment is also available, and if 
you have that, then there really isn't 
anything more that you'll ever need, 
no matter how upmarket your 
requirements are. 

Compatible: Any Amiga capable of 
running Art Department, 
although 4-8 Mbs of 
HAM are the practical 
minimum requirement. 



^3& 



IT you need A4 24>brt scans, Ihe Epson GT6&D0 is as goad as you'll ever need as you can see by 

this uikauE. curram tomp<nnnin means that Ihe price Is lading all lira time. 



The Epson GT 6b(JU has a serious 
price tag which reflects the serious 
use to which you can put it. Not only 
is it fasler than the previous version, 



ADDRESSES 

Golden Image 

Unit 1 2a 

MiUmead Business VCenlre 

Millmead Road 

Tottenham Hale 

N17 9QJ 

Tel:081 365 1 102 

Fax OS* 895 1953 

Meridian Distribution 

East House 

East Road Industrial Estate 

London SW1 9 1 AH 

Tel: 081 543 3500 

Fax: 061 543 3500 

Visual Products 

PO Box 43 

Great Missenden 

Bucks 

HP16 9HL 

Tel: 0494 890601 

Fax: 0494 B63S94 



ALFA DATA HAND ALFASCAN PLUS 



SCANNER 

£299 - GOLDEN IMAGE - 081 365 1102 



£129 - GOLDEN IMAGE - 081 365 1 102 





Although Nil scanner can be very Knnicky 1o 



Even if you can't justify tne price ol an 
Epson 24-bit scanner, you can still 
enjoy high quality colour scanning for a 
fraction of the price. 

The Alfa Data is a hand scanner 
almost identical in size to the 
monochrome scanners that have been 
around tor years. It's capable of colour 
scans at a resolution ol up to 2Q0 DPI 
in 1-B-bit coiour. II you're scanning 
images for a DTP package this is Nkeiy 
to meet all home needs, and you're 
onfy going to start running into prob- 
lems if you start increasing ihe size of 
a scanned image, in which case the 
limitations of its resolution start: lo 



set up. once you've go1 n working II produces become apparent. 

some damned fine results. ,,,,_ _, ■ ... 

When used in conjunction with an 
AGA Amiga, itie scanner produces quite impressive results, although it can 
take a little messing around to get the best from it. 

The device also offers grey scale scanning in up to 256 shades, and at a 
resolution of 400 DPI. The results in monochrome really are excellent, and 
even newspapers don't always scan at such a high resolution. 

CONCLUSION 

The Alfa Data colour scanner provides an excellent budget priced entry to Ihe 
world Of Colour scanning. I personally was surprised at Ihe quality of the 
results which were far higher than Id anticipated. Well worth a look. 



Whether you're designing a club 
newsletter or an advert to go in your 
local shop window, adding graphics 
will certainty perk up your presenta- 
tion and make what you've got to 
say considerably more interesting. 

The Alfascan Plus provides an 
inexpensive way of digitising phn 
tographs and pictures so that they 
can be included directly into your 
DTP documents. 

It offers up lo 256 shades of grey 
at a resolution of up lo 40QDPI. 
Once scanned, images can be 
saved as IFF files or TIFF images. If 
you opt for IFF, you can choose 
monochrome (two colour) images 
which retain the original scan's reso- 
lution, or you can save grey screens 
£256 colour on (he A1 200 and 4000 
or IS colour on pre-AGA Amigas. 



The Alfascan is a very nice scanner 
which produces impressive results. I've 
owned one for over a year any I simply 
wouldn't be without it. 
Requires 1Mb RAM 

Ottering, scans In up lo 2S6 shades of grey, 

Ihe AHascan Plus glut* vtry good value lor 
money, and Ihe results sra flood enough' lor 
newspaper work, 




US 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 




Desktop Video isn't just restricted to video pro- 
fessionals. With nothing more than a genlock 
and some software, you can create your own 
videos that would turn the BBC green with envy. 
To find out more, read on. .. 



where! The Amiga has made it big in 
the movie industry loo - in the smash 
hit movie 'Jurassic Park', an Amiga 
and VideoToaster combination was 
used to produce storyboards of the 
animated dinosaurs by ILM designer 
Slephan Dechant. 

That's not to say that desktop 



video is restricted to wealthy televi- 
sion studios only. Far tram it. Armed 
with nothing more than your Amiga, a 
couple of video decks and a genlock, 
you can spruce up your home videos 
of your Auntie Gertie getting drunk 
and embarrassing the lamily with 
ease. For those of you that aren't 'in 



M 



I est types of computer have 
their own 'niche', an area of 
computing where they particu- 
larly excell - Apple's Macintosh has 
made it big in desktop publishing, the 
Alari ST still reigns supreme in the 
music industry and the Amiga too 
has its own niche in the video mar- 
ket, Like the Mac and (to a lesser 
extent at least) the ST, the Amiga 
dominates its niche market with very 
little serious competition to trouble it. 
All around the world you'll find 
Amigas in television studios and 
movie post-production units happily 
rubbing shoulders with equipment 



116 



costing tens of thousands of pounds, 

If you switch on your television 
tonight, chances are you'll watch a 
program that has felt the influence ol 
Ihe Amiga - programs like the 'Chart 
Show', BSkyB's 'Games World' and 
'GamesMaster' feature video graph- 
ics produced entirely on the Amiga. 
Even top television shows like 
L Baby!on 5' and Spielberg's latest 
epic 'SeaQuesf have an Amiga 
working behind the scenes some- 

lf tvu Own * camcorder and an Amiga, then 

you too will be able to make some fairly 

■funning videos which will certainly rnftki 

your drab, rH.-lghbours' Julian/ holiday 

movies look especially sad, 




Desk Top Video 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 




Before leachl ng him all we knew about Ihe 
Amiga, CU Amiga's ax-lechnlcai edilor. Nick 
■'Filch, used Id present the weather on 
8naklt*i tv. Allegedly. 



the know; a genlock is simply a 
clever little device that combines the 
graphics you create on your Amiga's 
screen with a video signal produced 
by anything from a camcorder to a 
standard domestic video recorder. 
The genlock works by removing the 
background colour from the Amiga's 
video signal which allows the live 
video to show through (he gaps- that 
will inevitably appear, How much will 
it coat lo get started? Well, providing 
you already have two video decks 
and an Amiga, it's perfectly possible 
to buy a hall-decent genlock for the 
price of two games. And whoever 
said desktop video was expensive! 1 



&G N 



To be perfectly honesl, I very much 
doubt that any Amiga user worth 
their salt needs reminding just how 
well prepared the Amiga is for desk- 
top video work ."but what exactly is 
desktop video-? Well, ash anyone this 



question and you'll probably get 
pretty much the same answer time 
and time again -video titling. Fact is, 
most Amiga users stiJI consider video 
titling lo be the 'be all and end all" of 
desktop video, Believe it or not, how- 
ever, video titling is actually a fairly 
minor aspect of this all -important 
application. Sure, it's the one area of 
desktop video that most people use. 
but that's not to say that desktop 
video jus' entails adding a couple of 
flashy titles. 

Desktop video systems are capa- 
ble of so much more, however. Not 
only can you Overlay titles on top of 
your holiday videos, but you can also 
use your Amiga 10 control a video 
editor, a piece of hardware that con- 
nects to the Amiga that is capable of 
pin-pointing sections (or, as the video 
professionals call them, "Clips') of 
video footage from several source 
tapes, arranging them to suit your 
needs and than 'assembling' them 
onto your final mastertape. The 
resulting footage will appear to 
cleanly cut between 'scenes" without 
your audience having to endure 
those embarrassing or boring hours 
of footage that you ieft on the cutting 
room Hoor (in a manner of speaking, 
at least!). Combine this with the abil- 
ity to generate video titles and you've 
already got a system that can do 
pretty much the same job as the son" 
of expensive hardware the BBC use. 
What's more, an Amiga editing/titling 
system will cost you a fraction of the 
price of these so-called 'professional' 
systems. 




Wllh tumbling prices and [he January sales just around the corner, ll's possible lo pick up a 
decent camcorder for less than ££00. Ail you need then la a genlock, an Amiga, your home VCFi 
and you'll t* in the video production business, churning out an endless stream at lamily wed- 
dings, bl rlMays, christening*, lun*r«l* tndJ, Ft* the mure enlightened, births. 



CHROMAMAOIC 

There's very little video gadgetry that 
the professionals use thai hasn'l 
been released lor the Amiga in one 
form or another. One of the most 
exciting new developments in Amiga 
desktop video is Ihe 'Chroma Key' 
system, a device that works in con- 
junction with a genlock that alJows 
you lo create ihe fantastic 'blue 
screen' effects that made Superman 
fly and Wayne and Garth from the 
cuit movie 'Wayne's World' appear to 
travel lo exotic locations without leav- 



ing the television studio. Possibly the 
best (and most cliched!} example of 
this technique has lo be the TV 
weatherman who appears to stand in 
front of a map of the British Isles. If 
you were to view him 'live' within the 
television studio, poor old Michael 
Fish would be pointing at nothing 
more than a blank blue screen! 

All these effects (and more!) were 
created using a ChromaKey system. 
Put simply, a ChromaKey simply 
works in the opposite direction of a 
genlock. Whereas a genlock 'keys' » 



Video Setups 

You don't have to spend thousands of pounds 
to get started in desktop video With little 
more than s couple of VCRs and a genlock 
you can easily start working on video produc- 
tions thai would have turned BBC television 
engineers green with envy little more than a 
few years back. Let's take a look at three 
setups, starting from a very basic one to the 
sort of video setup thai video users dream of. 




Here's possibly the most basic desktop video 
setup you could start with. Although we substi- 
tuted the second video recorder for a camcorder, 
the theory is pretty much the same. The output 

from the camcorder (either live video or prere- 



corded footage} is fed into the genlock which 
combines ihe graphics produced on your Amiga 

into a genlocked signal which is then recorded 
onto tape via the VCF connected lo the gen- 
lock's "Video Out' socket. In order lo view the 
genlocked image, the video out signal from ihe 
VCR is connected directly to your monitor via its 
'CVBS' connector. 




Slightly more complex this one. With the addition 
of a video ediling system, we're given direct con- 
trol over source video material from a variety of 
different video decks. Video 'dips' can be taken 
from any point on any one of the source videos 
and synchronised automatically with graphics 
generated by the Amiga. More expensive video 
editing systems like the VideoPilot' will automati- 
cally handle the task of 'tape assembly' and will 
even Cue the Amiga when graphics are required, 



so the whole process is carried oul with minimal 
user interaction once the 'flow' ol video produc- 
tion has been setup. 




»-t. -tin 

Cfcroa mttry 




ras 



nm 



>«>*,, 





If you want the ultimate in desktop video 
setups (and can afford the asking price!), then 
this is the sort ol thing you should be looking 
at With the addition of a ChromaKey system 
and a Video Mixing deck (the most expensive 
bit!), this system can do everything that the 
previous setups could do plus we now have 
the option of putting live video actually on top 
of the Amiga's graphics to create the sort of 
■TV Weatherman' effects that have become so 
diehed these days, An extra monitor has also 
been added too, so that we can preview the 
output from the video mixing desk. Expect lo 
pay a packet for this sort of setup! 



^^^^^^™™ 



117 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 DCSk Top VidCO 




GertloeWma is a process whereby thfr ytphles from your Amiga « * «v»Hayed on top at a Ik™ 
video signal. In order for in* video signal lo be Been, the background colour from -your graph.™ 
Is remowd 



(overlays) your Amiga's graphics on 
lop of a live video signal, a 
ChrHjmaKey removes a certain colour 
from a Hive video signal (usually blue 
- hence the blue screen that Michael 
Fish points at!) and replaces il with 
your computer graphics giving The 
effecl of the live video being placed 
on top of the output from your Amiga. 

If you'fe lucky enough to own a 
camcorder, then a ChromaKey sys- 
tem really com^s into its own. By 
simply placing yourself in Inont of a 
highly contrasting coloured backdrop 
and then adjusting the ChromaKey 
so that it uses the colour of your 
backdrop as the 'key' colour, you can 
place yourself in front of any com- 
puter-generated backdrop. Buy 
yourself a digitiser and you can ev&n 
digitise images Of exotic locations 
and use ihem as your backdrops- 
Just think - you could travel to 
Moscow and stroll around Red 
Square with Bona Yeltsin, stand on 
the bridge of the Starship Enterprise 
and even do your own weather 
reports without leaving the comfort of 
your own home I 

SOFTWARE CHOICE 

Backing up all this video gadgetry is 
a formiddable selection ot desktop 
video software that will help you to 
create exciting video productions 
that run perfectly on cue. These 
generally come in two flavours - 
video titlers and video presentation 
systems. Video titlers are pretty 
obvious - using the Amiga's own 
powerful font handling capabilities, 
I hey allow you to create titles com- 
plete with special effects such as 
shadows, outlines etc. Some of the 
more powerful packages give you 
the chance to actually 'scroll' your 
titles in true television style both 
horizontally and vertically which is 



ideal for producing l he sort of 
'rolling credits' you see at the end 
of all television programs. If you're 
particularly proud of your holiday 
video, why not use a tilling program 
to let your audience know who the 
stars were, who the director was, 
who made the coffee aind - most 
important of all - who was respon- 
sible lor the fabulous titles that are 
assaulting their eyes! 

You don't have to buy a dedi- 
cated video titter for this sort of 
thing, however, Any conventional 
paint program: can be used to draw 
up some very flashy titles. DPainl is 
particularly well suited lo this sort 
of thing thanks to its powerful ani- 
mation facilities, DPainfs ability lo 
automatically generate animations 
of the transformation of a brush in 
three dimensions can be used lo 
create spinning logos just like those 
on 'Top ol the Pops' . 

Video presentation systems take 
the concept of the video titter one 
step further by allowing you to build 
up complex presentations that com- 
bine the titles you produced in your 
video fitter with static images, ani- 
mations and - il you're musically 
inclined - some form ol backing 
I rack. Gold Disk's ShowMakw is 
particularly good al this sort of 
ihing - not only can it do all the 
above things, but you can also play 
sound samples and MIDI sound 
tracks, apply Amiga : generated 
video 'wif>es f (transistions between 
one image and another) and you 
can even call upon the talents of 
other programs using its powerful 
ARexx facility. 



The Burgees Vi^g Group are one of 1tw 
bignoSt v'044 p* oducllcn houses In the UK and 

(hey use Amlgas to do ill 



Video signals layed bare 

You may well think that all video signals are prelly much trie same, but don't you believe 
il. Not only are there different formats over here in the UK, bet the same formats I in name 
al least) vary consirJ erab ly d spend i no upon wh i c h country yon I ive in. There a re pri marily 
Ihree dillerenl video 'systems' that are used around IN world: PAL (which Is the standard 
we use in Britain), Secant 1 1 tie French syslemi and HTSC llhe US system). The rJitlerences 
between these Ihree dillerenl systems must be underslnod il yau inlend lo buy a lot of 
expensive video hardware. Take HewTek's wonderful Video Tnasler hoard, for example. 
You may have seen previews (and even reviews) of il in other magazines, but the simple 
lactoflhe mailer isltiallhe Video Toasler is an NTSContydeviEe-lrytOOOnnBtl a PAl 
signal lo il and il wcn'l be able to make head nor tail si it. 

The answer lies in what the k tines call a 'video standards converter , a very expen- 
sive device that takes a video signal in one lormal (PAL, lor example) and converts it to 
another larmat [HTSC. lor example). Problem is, Itiese video converters can only handle a 
single video signal at once, so you'd need mare than one il you wanted lo use a device 
like the Video Toaster. Even then, a device like the Video Tnasler needs what is known as 
a Time Base Corrector' il you want lo feed It mare than one video signal. 

For us British videop biles lhal wanlta do nothing more Irian overlay titles from our 
PAL Ami gas on top of a PAL video signal, lb ere are very few problems to be encountered. 
It's important, however, to make sure that Ihe genlock or ChromaKey system that you buy 
matches Ihe video ou1|>Ul Irom your video decks. II you intend to workwilh higher resolu- 
tion SuperlrHS signals, lor example, then make sure you buy a genlock that can handle 
SuperVHS. 




Aniline ;ii i irldb'u tfmlilp' 

maul 4s nol compnllL'lL' 

with Hutmh Amiga* so 

■MM'* no* nlolol 

pwiiH lii taking oul for 

e-Kolic item?i like 

NfwTeli s 

Villi '..lln.l-.l.'l i 








118 



Desk Top Video amiga buyers guide 94 




MINIGEN 

£49.95 Lola Marketing 
0858 08018a 

Undoubtedly the cheapest genlock available on the market has to be 
Lola Marketing's new MiniGen. MiniGen isn't really that new, how- 
ever - mora seasoned Amiga users may remember that a company 
calied Applied Systems and Peripherals [ASAP to its friends) 
launched MiniGon over sis years ago. Back then MiniGen retailed fur 
over £100 totil Lola has resurrected MiniGen after a couple of years 
absence from the market at Ihis new low price. 

Specification wise, MiniGen is nothing special. Unlike units such 
as Roctec's RocGen Plus and even Lola's own MiniQen Pius, 
MiniGen does noi offer any form of fade or dissolve controls. Whai's 
more, if only handles composite video signals and even /^f+* 
then the image quality leaves a lol to be desired. As a \J^jjp 
very cheap introduction to desktop video, however, 
MiniGen is worth investigating. 



How Genlocks work 

We've all seen what a genlock is capable ol, but ho* do (hey aclually work? Well, 
believe it or noi, but Ihe process ol overlaying graphics on Id a 'live' video signal is a 
fairly minof funclion ol a genlock. All genlocks perform three Junctions: encoding, gen- 
locking and keying- When ihe genlock 'encode'!" a video signal, it lakes. Ihe RGB s-irjnal 
fed lo i1 irom Ihe Amiga and converts if into the video signal lormal required by Ihe 
genlock (either composite or SuperVHS depending upon Ihe type of genlock ton own}. 
Once encoded, il is then synchronised (genlocked) al syne pulse level with Ihe live" 
vid en signal led to the g en lack Irom your so urce video pi ayer , Finally. In nrrJer to 
superimpose the encoded Amiga Graphics, toe genlock removes all occurrences of a 
given key' colour from Ihe Amiga image which (hen allows the live video signal lo 
show Ihroughthe gaps lhat remain. Most genlocks restrict the key colour' (Ihe coloor 
thai is removedllothe Amiga's colour register Q, bul more expensive units allow you 
to specify the key : olou r you rse II . 



MINIGEN PLUS 



ROCGEN PLUS 



£149.95 Lola Marketing 0858 880182 £149.95 Silica Systems 081 309 1111 








Even Lola would admit that MiniGen isn't quite good enough lo compete 
against modern genlocks such as the FtoeGen Plus and so they've launched 
Ihe MiniGen Plus, an enhanced version of MiniGen that adds a few extra fea- 
tures to MiniGen's existing circuitry. To make room for those extra features, 
MiniGen Plus comes in a much larger solid steel casino thai can certainly take 
a few knocks. Unlike MiniGen, the MiniGen Plus offers an all-important RGB 
pass-thru connector and full fade and dissolve controls. 

The image quality of MiniGen Plus still leaves a lot to be desired even 
when compared to its nearest rivals. If you're in the markel for a genlock Willi 
these sort of features at this sort of price, then you're probably better off going 
for the RocGen Plus - not only does il offer superior image quality ^^^ 
bul it can also offer full compatibility with Roctec's excellent f7*5^ 

ChromaKey system. \^j^p 



r fX,v rr P\ 



If there was one genlock that was solely responsible for bringing about the 
timely demise of the original MiniGen, il had to be Roclec's original RocGen 
RG-300C. Roctec have since improved the RocGen immeasurably and the 
result is the RocGen Plus. Although it's limited to composite video signals only, 
il handles ihese very well indeed. One feature unique to a genlock at this price 
is the RocGen Plus' ability to alter the 'key' colour, a feature that is used to 
great effect with Roctec's own RocKey ChromaKey system. 

Like its rivals, the RocGen Plus offers full fade and dissolve controls which 
allow you to fade between video sources. In all, the RocGen Plus is an excel- 
lent first time genlock for those users that need the sophistication j- 
ol a much more expensive genlock without the high asking 
price, Highly recommended. 



t19 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 Desk TOp VldCO 



VIDEOCENTRE 



£495 G2 Video Systems 0252 7371 51 £299 GVP/Silica Systems 081 309 1111 



» 



G-LOCK 




Thanks to a recent drop in price across their entire range, G2's excellent 
range of professional quality genlocks are now a serious option to both the 
amateur and professional videopriile. Their entry level genlock is the 
VideoCentre, a well designed and well built genlock that is pitched squarely at 
the Rendale Super 6802' am* GVP's G-Lock. 

Trie VideoCentre consists of a large cream-coloured unit that, via the long 
lead supplied with the unit, is designed lo be placed next to the Amiga's key- 
board, giving direct control over the genlock's many functions. Like the Super 
8802 and G-Lock, the VideoCentre otters full SuperVHS and composite video 
signal compatibility and comes as standard with both fade and dissolve con- 
trols. Although still rather pricey when compared to the GVP G-Lock, the 
VideoCantro is still an excellent genlock. If you're prepared lo pay 
almost £200 more than the price of G-Lock, you'll find the 
VideoCentre to be a very capable performer. 



GVP have an unrivalled reputation for producing slate of the art Amiga 
products that leave the competition for dead and their G-Lock genlock cer- 
tainly doesn't disappoint, Although it boasts a rather strange design that 
doesn't immediately s-eem that practical, l he G-Lock is one of ihe first 
Amiga genlocks that can be completely controlled through software. GVP 
themselves include a control pane) utility but - thanks to G- Lock's excellent 
ARexx implementation - there's no reason whalsoever why you couldn't 
control G-Lock from any video presentation system capable of sending 
ARexx commands! 

Like its competitors, the Rendale Super 9B0.2 and VideoCentre Plus, the 
G-Lock handles both SuperVHS and composite video signals and the image 
quality is very high indeed. If you need SuperVHS compatibility,^—^. 
then this is the genlock to buy - especially when you consider \"A^) 
lhai it's hundreds of pounds cheaper than its competition! 



RENDALE A8802 FMC 

£178 Marcam Ltd 06O2 790466 



GENESYS 




£799 G2 Video Systems 0252 7371 51 

Q2 certainly isn't rJhe sort of company that stands slid. Not content with already 

offering Amiga videophiles ihree different types of VideoCentre genlock, G2 
recently released the GeneSys genlock, its price lag may seem rather steep, 
but GeneSys is the first truly affordable professional quality genlock to be 
released for the Amiga. GeneSys is based around the same keying technology 
used in its broadcast qualify VC3 genlock, an expensive rackmounted genlock 
designed for use wilhin the professional video industry. As a result, the image 
quality is totally lop-notch. 

Like its little brother, the VideoCentre Plus, GeneSys can handle both 
SuperVHS and composite video signals although the extra bandwidth deliv- 
ered by those VC3 circuits gives much better picture quality. Although not 
included as standard, G2 also supply an optional remote unit that allows you to 
perform all sorts of fade end dissolve operations without having lo reach 
across to access the genlock's own controls. An excellent genlock ^^fff^j. 
at a reasonable price. ff^jg 



Marcam may not be a household name to most Amiga users, but their range 
of Rendale- genlocks aire some of the mosl popular and well equipped on the 
market. The latest addition lo Ma ream's range is the A8802 FMC, an 
enhanced version of the original A8802 genlock. The device consists of a 
rather plain looking metal box that connects to the Amiga's video port and a 
separate effects box that can be brought around to sit next lo your Amiga's 
keyboard. This effects box gives the AS602 FMC the ability to fade between 
signals and a special 'keyhole' feature that lets you change Ihe key colour 
used by Ihe genlock hardware. 

The A&B02 FMC can take inpul from just about any composite video device 
and, although the A&802 is not broadcast quality, the quality of the keyed sig- 
nal is virtually second to none amongst genlocks in this price range. The 
A8&Q2. FMC may not be as powerful as SuperVHS equipped genlocks like 
GVP's offering, but it more than matches the likes of Ihe RocGen t 
Plus, etc- Highly recommended. 



120 



GENLOCK! NG TOP TIPS 

Producing decent qua I Ity genlocked images is a line art In itself, hul follow these simple 
guidelines and your ge mocked video signals will be crystal cleat. 

1 . Always use first generation video mats rial 

Even/time you make a copy of a videotape, Ihe copy quality will degrade which can make 
the q en luck lose sync when you attempt to overlay graphics on top of the live video signals. 
flat all possible, always use the original mastertape 

Z. Use good qua lily video leads. 

All leads introduce a certain amount of 'raise' into a video signal and so It's very important 

lhai you go for Ifie best qualify leads lhai you can alia rd . Try to avtiiil using leads <h at aren't 

desi an ed lo carry video si gnals (audio le ads , for esampl e ). II i i doubt, have a cfi al with 

your Iriendly local camcorder supplier. 

3. Use a PAL Encoder. 

If Ihe quality nl yutir final results is still a bit below par, then you may want to Invest in what 
is known as a 'PAL Encoder'. These devices take a video signal, strip out Its sync signals 
and then add new (stronger) sync signals. This will give you a much more stable piclurs. 
PAL Encoders are available from m ost camcorder stockists far around £1 DO . Also ava i lab lo 
are what is known as "Video Enhancers' that do pretty much Ihe same Job lor less money. 



Desk Top Video 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



VIDEO DIRECTOR 



G2 ILLUSION 



£ 1 40.95 Gold Disk (UK) Ud 071 498 3275 £995 G2 Video Systems 0252 737 1 5 1 



Mr* 



if you have access to either a camcorder or a video recorder that can be con- 
trolled externally via a Sony 'Lane' connector (also known as "Control L") then 
Gold Disk's Video Director may be the answer to your videc editing needs. 
Video Director is primarily a software-based syslem but Gold Disk do include a 
number of leads which allow your Amiga lo communicate with any camcorder 
capable of reading control signals via the Lane standard. Be very careful, how- 
ever - there are about TO or so different types of Lane used within the 
camcorder marKet so make sure that Video Director handles your particular 
equipment before handing over your hard earned cash. 

Once everything is connected up, the Video Director program allows you to 
define short snippets ol video footage anywhere on a tape. These 'clips', as 
Ihe program calls them, can then be arranged inlo order and when you come 
lo 'assemble' your maslertape, Video Director automatically winds your source 
video backwards and forwards so that the correct snippets of footage is 

recorded onto your 
maslertape. It may 
not be perfect, bul 
Video Director works. 
If it is compatible 
with your 
video set- 
up then 
give it a try. 



Bald Disk If 



EJfCT 



, i 

*-\ 






— I 



W 



— 



fin: I 
QJP 5 



"ft 




HESET | 



3 



S<EH£»|3(Dif«| » I tFT.IT | WEBJTJ 



jffir 




1 



Gnid Disk's Video Director 
provides a cheap and 
cheerful method of editing 
vidso on VCRe and r^m 
r. orders equipped with 
Suny's 'LANC" interlace. 



ROCKEY 



f 1 29.95 Silica Systems 081 309 1111 



ff you thought ChromaKeys were 
terribly expensive items then think 
again. Rocteo manufacturers of 
the highly rated 'RocGen' gen- 
lock, have come up with the 



FocKey, an inexpensive 
Chroma Key system that will allow 

you to create fantastic 

ChromaKey effects for very little 
cash. RocKey is designed to be 





At the opposite end of the Chroma Key market is G2's recently released 
Illusion, a wonderfully powerful chromakey system that wouldn't look out of 
place in a professional video studio. Costing almost £1000, Illusion isn't cheap 
however, so you need to be able to justify its use i) you're serious about spend- 
ing Ihis sort of cash. If you make money out of your desktop video set-up, 
however, Illusion is well worth considering. 

Unlike Ihe FocKey unit, Illusion has the benefit of being a completely stand- 
alone ChromaKey system thai includes ils own built-in genlock. It also produces 
(and processes) lull broadcast quality video signals, so there's no reason what- 
soever why this unit couldn't be used in a professional set-up. Illusion also 
benefits from full SuperVHS compatibility and so image quality is very good 
indeed, Add to this more controls than you'd find on the bndge of the Slarship 
Enterprise and it's easy lo see why Illusion has been selling so well. 
A recommended purchase for all professional videophiles. 



used in conjunction with the 
RocGen genlock although it can 
Iheorcctically be used with just 
about any genlock, 

Like any ChromaKey system, 
you need to place the 'live' sub- 
ject that you wish to key in front 
of a plain background that con- 
irasts heavily with it. You'll 
obviously need a colour cam- 



corder for ihis, so make sure that 
all these hardware requirement 
are taken into consideration when 
yoy finally hand over your hard 
earned cash. Once connected, 
however, it's a fairly easy task lo 
adjust Ihe ChromaKey so that the 
background behind the live sub- 
ject is removed (good lighting is 
Ihe key here!). From here on you 
can create all sons of wondrous 
video effects such as 
ChromaKeying, simple overlay 
(tfM same as a genlock), luma 
key, key sandwich and many oth- 
ers, For the price, /^9*%. 
RocKey is an absolute \I^jiQ 
bargain. 






m 



ChromaKeys 

Adding a ChromaKey la your video set up 
can open up a whole new dimension tg 
your video productions. A ChromaKey 
essentially carries oul pretty much the 
tame function as a genlock albeit in the 
opposite direction. Whereas a genlock 
pla ces the Ami ga o raplnics o n top of I i ve 
video, a ChromaKey removes the back- 
ground colour Irom a live video signal 
an d places It on lop ol your Am iga 's 
graphics allowing you lo create 'TV 
Weatherman -style ellscls- 



Amiga buyer s cuioE 94 Desk Top Video 



» 



SC ALA HVT 



£49.95 Silica Systems 081 309 1111 

Think of video titling and chances are that Scaia will spring to mind. During the 
few years that Scata and its many incarnations have been with us, the pro- 
□ram has managed to carve itself an impressive foothold in an aggressive 

market. Even 
Commodore and 
[according to rumours at 
least) IBM use Scaia for 
both their multimedia 
and video presentation 
needs. The 'baby' of the 
Seals range is Scaia 
HVT (Home Video 
Titter) which was previ- 
ously sold under the 
name of Scaia 500. 
Although it's a cut down 
version of the full Scaia 
MM2QQ package, Scaia 
HVT is still a tiller to be 
reckoned with. 

Scaia presentations 
are based around a sys- 
tem of 'pages', each of 
which can contain a 
screen-full of lilies. 
Scaia includes its own 
built-in titler which, 

although essentially simple, is powerful enough for most people needs. Not 
only can rt handle titles in a variety of different tont styles, but you can also 
add oullines, shadows and 'raise' the title to form a sort of 3D effect^ 
The only Ity in its ointment is the fact that it can't handle scrolling 
text, For the average home user, however, Scaia HVTis a dream 
come true. 




Based iir. ihe succ««»rul Scaia MM2Q0- package 
ideal lool tor producing video MM. 



Scaia HVT it an 



VIDEOSTAGE 

£TBA Ae^DroJapmeifeOlOl 310427 1227 

The latest arrival on 
the video titling and 
presentation scene is 
VideoStage from 
those Amiga veter- 
ans, Aegis 
Developmenfs. 
Based around the 
look and feel of 
Aegis' Presentation 
Master, VideoStage 
allows you to create 
entire video presenta- 
tions that include; 
static graphics, titles 
and even structured 
images designed 
using the program's 
own built-in drawing 
tools. What's mors, 
you can even make 
use of animated 

brushes that wfwz in and out of the screen at break-neck speeds and a whole 
range of professional-quality video wipes. 

Possibly the most impressive aspeel of VieteoStstge, however, is its power- 
ful video 'sequencer that allows you to arrange and then rearrange your video 
presentation to suit your own particular needs. Although rather similar in use to 
State's own 'page sorter. VitjeoStage lakes this system one step further by 
allowing you to create modular presentations that can even call Video subrou- 
tines'- That is, small sections of a presentation that can be called 
again and again from different points within your presentation. 
In all. a powerful package that is well worth the asking price. 




, 



II you wanl a desktop video presentation program thai c?n do It all. 
look no further than Aegis VldeoSlajjc. 



SHOWMAKER 



£ 1 80 Gold Disk (UK) Lid 071 498 3275 

Gold Disk's ShowMaker package may bg growing rather long in the tooth these days, hut it's still a very powerful pa^ 
^^^^^i^i^^S^^- Like Aegis' VioeoSlage Reviewed above), Short**, allows youto 
c?ea«e full-blown video presentations although the range of different resources that your v,deo production can wU upon 
,s considerably larger Not only can ShowMaker handle static t.lles, images and animations, but you can even incorpo- 
rate samded sounds MFF-lormat MIDI music files and control other applications via ARexi. 

StrowMaker uses a very simple to use editing system that Is based around a time line'. Events such « Splaying* 
picture, playing a sampled sound, etc, are added simply by click on the point within the appropriate time line and then 
dragging out the event to 
set rts duration. Both the 
start and end points of 
evonts can be fine tuned 
so your video presentation 
runs in perfect time . 
A powerful P ack YT^^fek 
age at a \4JjP 

reasonable price. 



Gold Dipk's ShowMnker lets. 
you treale complex irtdao pre- 
sentation u*mg a 'drag and 

click 1 time line editing *f stem. 



122 




BIG ALTERNATIVE 
SCROLLER 2 

£79.95 Alternative 
Image 0533 440041 

The guys (and gals) at Alternative 
Image spend each, and every day 
working on professional desktop 
video products and so you'd be 
right to expect greai things from a 
package designed tor their own 
personal use. The Big Attentat!** 
Scroiief 2 is a cheap and cheerful 
video titling program geared 
entirely to the task of adding titles 
to your home videos. The previous 
release ot this program, suffered 
terribly Irom jittery scrolling but 
thankfully A I have managed to sort 
this out in this new revision. 

The program lacks many of the 
aesthetically pleasing features of 
full-blown video fitters such as 
Scaia HVT but il more ttian makes 
up for any limitations thanks to its 
impressive selection of titling tools. 
As its name suggests, the Big 
Alternative Scrolled forte is 
scrolling text and this it does very 
well indeed. Titles can be 
scrolled across and up the 
screen at full user-definable 
speeds. For simple sT^^fc* 
titles, BAS2 is deti- ^itW 
nitely worth checking out. 






Desk Top Video amiga buyers guide "94 



VIDM2AGA 

If you're looking for a low-cost victeo digitiser lhal 
can grab full colour images direcl from any com- 
posite video 
source with- 
out the need 
for colour fil- 
ters then look 
no further 
than Rombo's 
Vidi-12 AGA. 
As its name 
suggests, 
VidM2 fully 
supports the 
new VGA- 
style 256 
colour and 

262,141 colour HAMB screen modes offered by the 
AG A chip set, making it a dig itiser that is totally 
bang up to date. Although it can'l capture full 
colour images in realtime, Vidi's built-in RGB split- 
ter makes short work of grabbing colour images 
automatically. Monochrome images can be 
grabbed in realtime, however, making it an ideal 
tool tor grabbing short digitised animations, 

Rombo are soon lo release two new realtime 
colour versions of Vidi called Vidi-12 RT and Vidi- 
24 RT which will allow you to grab full colour 
video footage in full colour. These will cost 
around E100 more than the basic Vidi-12 
reviewed here so unless you need f^f± 
realtime colour digitising, this is the \Jj^^ 
one to go lor. 




V-LAB 

f« 2 oft„r<ir 9 s e 8 n ?i83 

If you want the ultimate in Amiga video digitisers, 
I hen MacroSystems' V-Lab (marketed in the UK 
by ACS) is the answer. Available both as a plug 
in card for the Amiga 1 500/2000 (and 4000, of 
course) and as an external unit for the rest of the 
Amiga range, V-Lab offers full colour digitising at 
24-bit resolution Irom any composite or Super- 
VHS source. Image qualify is very good indeed 
and images can be 'cleaned up 1 si ill further with 
V -Lab's excellent image processing tools. V-Lab 
may not be cheap, but it still repre- 
sents very good value ior money. 



VIDE0MASTER 



£60 HJSoft 



718181 




V«u loo can capture stunning images like (his! 




Possibly the cheapest video digitiser available for 
the Amiga has to be AVRs VideoMasier, a small 

unit that connects to Ihe expansion slot of any 
A500. Previously marketed by MicroDeal but now 
under the wing of HiSoft, VideoMasier combines a 
realtime digitiser and sound sampler in one box. 
Although the qualify of digitised images isn't that 
great, VideoMaster can grab monochrome images 
direct from video tape in realtime and its powerful 
'Sequencer" software allows you to produce won- 
derful animations with ease. Colour digitising is. 
somewhat more involved - just like NewTek's ail- 
ing Dig i View, VideoMasier can only grab from a 
monochrome video camera using colour splitters, 
Considering the price, however, /^^fc 

VideoMasier is an ideal choice for any *s£jg£ 
videophile on a tight budget. 



Genlocks 


PRODUCT GUIDE TABLE 














SUPPLIERS 


Product 


Supplier 


Pries 


RGB 
Pa$6thru 


S-VHS 


Fade/ 
Dissolve 


Broadcast 

Quality 


Rating 




Silica Systems 


0Q1 309 1111 


MiniGen 


Lola 


£49,95 


NO 


Mo 


Wo 


No 


#10 




Goifl Disk UK 


071 498 3275 


MiniGen Plus 


Lola 


£149.95 


res 


NO 


Yss 


No 


6/10 




G2 Systems 


0252 7371 51 


RocGen Plus 


Silica 


£139.95 


res 


No 


Yes 


No 


#10 




Alternative Image 


0533 440041 


VideoCenlns 


G2 Systems 


C495.95 


res 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


7/10 




Marcam Ltd 


0602 790466 


GeneSys 


G2 Systems 


£799.95 


res 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


7/10 




Aegis Development 


s 0101310 427 1227 


Heritkki Super 88G2 


Marcam Ltd 


ESOT.95 


res 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


6V10 




Alco International 


0635 48797 


GVP (3-LDCk 


Silica 


E299.95 


res 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


9/10 




Lola Marketing 
Rom bo 


0858 8801 B2 
0S06 414631 


Video Editors 


















HI Soft 


0525 718181 


Product 


Supplier 


Price 


S-VHS 


Auto 


VCR 


Broadcast 


Hating 




ACS 


cage 87583 


VideoDirector 


Gold Disk 


£149.95 


Yes 


Assemble 
Yes 


Control 

Yes 


Quality 

No 


e/io 














VideoPilol V330 


Mod 


El 299 


res 


Yea 


Yea 


Yes 


9/10 






Chromakey Systems 


















Product 


Supplier 


Price 


&VHS 


Key 
Control 


Genlock 


FadeV 
Dissolve 


Broadcast 

Quality 


Rating 




ROCKey 


Silica 


El 29.95 


Mo 


No 


No 


re& 


No 


10/10 




Illusion 


G2 Systems 


£995.95 


Y&S 


'Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


#10 




Digitisers 

Product 


Supplier 


Price 


S-VHS 


AGA 


Realtime 


Realtime 
Colour 


RGB 

Splitter 


Rating 




Vidi-12 AGA 


Rom bo 


£9995 


No 


res 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


SftO 




V-Lafc 


ACS 


£299 


Yes 


res 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


#10 




VideoMasier 


HiSoft 


£69.95 


No 


NO 


Yes 


No 


No 


#10 




Titling Software 




















Product 


Supplier 


Pries 


Amiga Fonts 


Scrolling 


Brushes 


Wipes/Fades 


AGA 


Rating 




Scale HVT 


Silica 


£49.95 


Yes 


No 


Yss 


Yes 


No 


9/10 




Big Alternative Seroler 2 Memalm* Image 


£79.95 


Yes 


res 


Yes 


No 


No 


7/10 




Presentation Software 


















Product 


Supplier 


Price 


Ttuer 


Fades/Wipes 


Multi -Pages 


AGA 


Animations 


Sound Brushes Timing Control Rating 


VideoStage 


tog i 


ETBA 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Ng 


No Yes 


Yes B/1D 


3 hew Maker 


Gold Disk 


£199 


Yes 


Yes 


Ye* 


No 


Yea 


Y« Yes 


Yes 9/10 



123 



\NttJfife 



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AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Education 



■* 




From preschool software to programs that 
follow the National Curriculum, educational 
packages have become ever more sophisti- 
cated. No matter what your interests, there will 
be a program that's tailored to your educational 
needs. 

COOMB VALLEY SOFTWARE 










I fa n Lycett-Kirvg once sat down at his 
Atari ST and wrote a small adven- 
ture game on STAC for his children 
to play, which would leach them 
some basics ol mathematics. Before 
he knew it, he had a thriving busi- 
ness, selling educational adventure 
games on both the ST and the 
Amiga (converting the ST games 
using AMOS). A couple of years 
later, and Coomb Valley Software 
are seven games- in, and at just 
under fifteen pounds apiece, you 
could do a lot worse 

Starting with Maths Dragons, and 
working through Reasoning With 
Trolis, Cave M&ze. Picture Fractions 
and coming up to dale with Time 
Flies, each of the games follows the 
same basic pattern - you are placed 
in a small maze, with a collection of 
items scattered about the place, arte 
you have to locate the iiems and 
return them to their correct places. 
In Tidy The House, you need to rind 
all (he objects in the wrong places, 
and return them while dressing your 
younger brother and sister, while 
Picture Fractions has you searching 
a go-Win maze lor pieces ol a jigsaw 
puzzle. 

In most of the games, the actual 
educational part comes when you 
meet other characters. Generally, 

1M 



when you have collected a piece of 
whatever il is you are alter, you will 
be interrupted between rooms with 
the message 'You have met a ..." 
and asked to solve a problem. Gel it 
right, and the other person leaves. 
Get it wrong and the other person 
leaves, taking one of your objects 
with them. 

As I've said, the whole thing has 
been written in AMOS, and is fairly 
simple in design. As a result, both 
the parser and the graphics used 
within the games leave a lot to be 
desired, Let's face it, the visuals are 
awful. At best, they are merely badly 
drawn images. Al worst, they are 
completely unrecognisable. 
Likewise, the parser rarely extends 
above two dozen words, and you 
only really find yourseU using a tew 
of those, 

Ol course, the basis of all these 
games is the actual education part 
itself, and this is what lets most or 
the games down. The basis of 
many educalional games is to pre- 
set the problems in an involving 
and enticing way. These just pause 
the game and slick a sum on 
screen. Sorry, but that's about as 
welcome as a math's exam in the 
m idd le of Uritfium 2. f^** 




NODDY'S BIG ADVENTURE 

JUMPING BEAN CO. £24.99 

Unlike most educalional packages, 
Noddy's Big Adventure doesn't aim 
to teach children anything in particu- 
lar. Aimed at the pre-schocl crowd, 
this interactive creativity pack simply 
helps a child develop his or her cre- 
ative skills through a series of fun 
games and activities. Like the first 
Noddy game. Noddy's Playtime is 
essentially a collection of a dozen or 
SO games, strung together as loca- 
tions in Toytown. Drive around the 
large scrolling map. until you come to 
a taxi rank, and then park to enter 
one of the four main locations - 
beauh, house, Monkey village and 
Goblin village. 

Once in a location, you are shown 
a still scene from the area. The nice 
thing here is that you can have (un 
just finding out what animates when 
you click on it, and whaldoesn't. 
Occasionally when you dick on 
something you'll be asked if you want 



to play a game -this is how you lake 
part in the actual educalional part ot 
the game, Games such as Can You 
Find Me, Moody's Scales and Beach 
Sorter teach children to choose 
between similar objects, grasp simple 
maths and English, but essentially 
develop hand to eye co-ordination 
and basic organisational skills, 

Noddy's Big Adventure is a major 
improvement over the first Noddy 
game. The whole structure of the 
package flows in a more logical way, 
with the animated linking scenes 
offering interesting ways to move 
through the package, The three diffi- 
culty levels makes it ideal for anyone 
from the age of three upwards, and 
the extremely simple interlace means 
lhal anyone from the age of three 
upwards is going to be able to use it 
unaided. Loads ol fun and very 
entertaining, Noddy's Big Adventure 
is a great bit of kit. 



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9 




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Education 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



ADI MATHS- 11/12 YEARS 

EUROPRESS SOFTWARE £25.99 



If someone offered lo introduce you 
to a Moveable extraterrestrial who 
will... act as your alien tutor as well 
as your computer-based friend.. He 
will always be on hand 10 help you 
with your problems, give you advice 
and reward you with games/ you 
might think they'd read Douglas 
Adams' hitchhicker's Guide to the 
Galaxy once too often. This enthusi- 
astic gushing does not come from 
the marketing department of the 
Sirius Cybernetics Corporation, how- 
ever, but from Eu repress Software, 
and is about ADI, the interactive ani- 
mated character who fronts its 
eponymous series of educational 
programs. 

Besides being your plastic pal 
who's lun to be with, ADI can be a 
stern taskmaster, posing a wide 
range of mathematical problems. His 
tests cover parts of the mathematical 
course 1 1 and 12 year-old children 
will face during thai difficult first year 
of secondary education. Techniques 
of calculation, percentages, gecmet^ 
ric constructions, symmeiry, algebra, 
and statistics are just some of the 
elements included in this package, 
based foosley around the theme of 
the Seven Wonders ol the World. 
The ADI series, designed to accom- 
pany what kids learn a! school, 
covers many parts of the National 
Curriculum, and partially fulfills many 
more. These problems are no push- 
over and, believe me, it's a humbling 
experience to be reminded just how 
much mathematical knowledge you 
have forgotten since facing your O 
Levels {Don't worry - I did pass the 
Maths one at the time!). I suspect 
many parents who buy this program 
will feel similarly if they 
themselves. 

Recognising 
that a computer- 
based tutor can't 
put kids in deten- 
tion, ADI has 
nine different 
games which are 
made available to 
his pupils in pro- 



portion to the number of points 
they score by answering questions 
correctly - a carrol and stick-at-it 
approach, you might say. ADI 
offers on-screen background info 
on the subjects he covers, and a 
norebook and calculator to help the 
resolution of problems. His usually 
encouraging textual comments can 
become angry if a pupil persistently 
answers a question incorrectly. The 
Help mode could, perhaps, have 
been improved for such circum- 
stances - I did not notice ADl's 
advice becoming progressively 
detailed with repeated failure on a 
particular question, which I would 
have expected 

ADI also provides a 'mini-encyclo- 
pedia' of simple animations on a 
miscellany of topics children often 
wonder about: the origin of man, 
birth, the flow of blood, pJarcets, Ihe 
food chain, and volcanoes, for exam- 
ple. A basic atlas of Europe is also 
included. 

In terms of the standard of graph- 
ics and sound, ADI does not come 
near the potential of the Amiga: 
ADl's 'whistly voice', for example, is 
actually an ear-piercing shreik ot the 
sort produced for Doctor Who by the 
BBC Radiophonic Workshop, circa 
1970. Genuinely unpleasant to listen 
to, switch it off unless you want to 
scare the kids away. In terms g.f lay- 
out, however, each element of this 
icon or keyboard-controlled package 
is clearly explained and easy to use. 
Overall, it is an extensive leaching 
tool which will help children come to 
terms with difficult concepts through 
explanation, effort and encourage- 
ment. 




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COMPOUND 



THE WORD CONSTRUCTION SET 

LASCELLES SOFTWARE - £24.95 



This is an unusual education pack- 
age to review in that it isn't for kids. 
The Word Construction Set is 
designed lo help English students 
understand the way words and sen- 
tences are constructed, along with 
all the other little quirks in this fine 
language ot ours, such as the vari- 
ous vowel sounds, plurals, 
extended endings and so on. The 
eventual aim is to assist students in 
reading and speaking English, but 
one main oversight on the part of 
the designers renders the package 
almost completely unusable. 

But lirst the game itself, The 
main screen shows you seven dif- 
ferent buildings under construction, 
and you have to work through each 
of these, building each tower by 
performing specific tasks. For 
example, in Castle Endings, you 
have to stick, the correct ending 
onto plurals and singular words 
according to tense. Every time you 
get a word right, another block is 
added to the building. Similarly, the 



Homophone Observatory teaches 
you to differentiate between words 
that sound the same, but have dH- 
ferent meanings, such as Pear and 
Pair. 

In each game you are given 
three sets of small words or parts 
of words, and a crane with which 
you stick the pieces together to 
hopefully create the word the 
computer is asking for. This is 
where the major problem comes 
in. Obviously il would be too easy 
on the student il the Amiga 
printed the word it wanted on 
screen. Instead, the program uses 
the Amiga speech synthesis to 
'say' Ihe words, and everyone 
who has ever used or heard the 
Amiga Speech program wilt know 
just how unintelligible il can be - 
a bit of a hinderance when you're 
trying to leach someone a foreign 
language. A bit like Arthur Mullard 
irying to teach French really, 
pointless. ^^ ^^ 



KIM - THE MEMORY GAME 

LASCELLES SOFTWARE £24.95 



Kim, the game, is based upon Kim, 
the Rudyard Kipling character who 
can correctly remember the patterns 
etched onto twenty stones in a bag. 
In ihe game you have more visual 
icons to play with, but the principal is 
the same You are shown up to ten 
different tiles, and have lo remember 
what they are. Then the screen is 
filled with twenty different tiles, and 
you have lo pick out the ones you 
remember. Simple, yes, but far from 
easy, particularly for the young age 
range this is aimed at. 

There are twelve different sets of 
tiles for you to play with, ranging 
from animals to flags to shapes and 
colours, and each can be viewed as 
pictures or words. This way you can 
develop eilher your shape recogni- 
tion skills or your reading skills, while 
at Ihe same time sharpening your 
memory. As you play, your score is 
totalled until it is high enough to be 
entered on the Honours List, and all 
Ihe way through you are supported 
and encouraged, both by the sen- 
tences that appear on screen, and 
the sampled woman's voice that 




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FOOD 
CLOTHE 
NUMBERS 




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stales your progress. 

But such congratulation and sup- 
port only appears once you have 
done the task, and the actual words 
thai appear on screen are so small 
thai they might as well not be I he re. 
This program has a few niggling 
flaws like that when it comes to 
design. For example, at the start of 
the game you are asked to enter 
your name, but then il never uses it 
unlil you get on the high score 
table, Although it isn't a bad pack- 
age at all, it's still a few steps 
behind something like -^n*x 

Paint And Create ^J^3 » 

127 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Education 




ADI JUNIOR COUNTING 

£25.99 EUROPRESS SOFTWARE 



Fronted by ADI Junior, the sprightly 
little cousin of ADI, this package tar- 
gets the basic mathematical skills of 
two younger age groups - four to 
five year-olds and the sis to sevens- 
The colourful menu screen, through 
which all the aspects otitis program 
are accessed, is actually an ani- 
mated picture. Practically all the 
objects shown respond in one way or 
another when clicked on with the 
mouse , enticing the user further into 
the program by intriguing them as to 
what will happen next, 

With 1 5 activities for each ot the 
age groups this product is aimed at, 
ADI Junior Computing gives a pleas- 
ant introduction lo the basics of 
adding-up and taking-away. Three 
levels of difficulty allow the child to 
progress through subjects like count- 
ing objects, Identifying numbers by 
word and figure, and painting by 
numbers, One of the tasks, for 
example, involves coupling the num- 
ber ol sightseers, who visit a castle - 



if the coming s and goings are kept 

track of the end sequence shows a 
knighl walking round his home 
switching off the lights, In another 
part of the program, for junior coun- 
ters increasing in confidence, a 
series of sums may be undertaken 
against the clock. 

There are, in addition, plenty ot 
activities to be done which are unre- 
lated lo maths - a ear racing game, 
jigsaws, and identikit faces may all 
be played with, The graphics are 
bright and entertaining; the range of 
sound effects is both wide and of 
high quality, The voice which speaks 
the advice given to users when they 
press the Help key is exceptionally 
dear, albeit in a cutesy American 
way, which is sure to help ADI Junior 
give the intended impression of a 
helpful and instructive playmate, An 
activify-packed program which really 
does make learning fun, ihis excel- 
lent piece of software is thoroughly 
recommended. s^T^k 



MINT POT 2 

E19.99 KIDS ACADEMY 

As an art package aimed specifically 
at children. Paint Pol 2 may be seen 
as falling midway between the draw- 
ing elements of The Shoe People 
and more sophisticated art pro- 
grams, such as Kids Pk 
Unfortunately, its price and compara- 
tively limited range of functions 
prevent it from being an adequate 
competitor to either, 

Aimed al Sour to fen year-olds, 
Paint Pot 2 allows the user to draw 
pictures frehand, and take the short 
cuts offered by line, box, circle, and 
ellipse drawing tools, Paint Pot 2 is, 
in fad, as much a colouring-in pro- 
gram as a drawing one - it comes 
with about 20 line drawings ready for 
loading and fillmg-in. The colouring is 
an easy process thanks to the (ill tool 




which is also available. A total of 16 

colours may be used to construct 
any particular painting, and the tones 
of each may be varied, allowing for a 
far larger number of colours to be 
used (although still no more than 1 6 
lor each drawing, of course}. The 
pictures can also be saved and 
printed. 

The main tune and sound eflects 
are competent and the presentation 
is appealing, but this program's only 
real plus is its ease ot use. If your 
child has even vaguely serious inten- 
tions of drawing on a computer, you 
would be better off buying Kid Pi* or, 
if 1 hey Ye in their teens, a copy Ol 
Deluxe Pain! or Brilliance. 




THE SHOE PEOPLE 

£9.99 FIRST CLASS 

The Shoe People is based on the 

'award winning' cartoon series - 
which I freely admit to never having 
heard Of. If your tour to six year-olds 
are fans, however, and even if 
they're not, they are sure to enjoy 
this varied package of activities. 

Geared towards meeting ihe 
guidelines ol the National 
Curriculum, The Shoe People con- 
tains five games and a simple 
drawing and colouring program. In 
the drawing section, kids can even 
save their drawings lo disk, print 
them (il /our printer's up to ii, ol 
course), or print out Ihe selection of 
line drawings included for old-fash- 
ioned felt-tip and crayon style 
eolouring-in. 

The games all feature Shoe 
People, like Trampy, PC Boot, 
Wellington. Baby Bootee, and 
Sergeant Major. They help introduce 
kids to the basics ol English, maths. 



shapes and patterns through a 
series of tasks such as associating 

words with objects., spelling those 
words, dilferentiating between upper 
and lower case letters, arranging 
simitar blocks in groups, and solving 
simple anagrams. Different levels of 
difficulty are available for each game, 
allowing a clear path of development 
lor a child to follow. 

As the game is aimed at such 
young children, Clever Clogs 
(Shoe Town's Educational 
Adviser), makes no bones about 
recommending that 'grown-ups' go 
through the games together with 
the kiddies in their charge. That 
shouldn't be too hard a task: the 
pleasing graphics, amusing little 
animations, good music and sound 
effects make this a highly enter- 
taining package. Highly _ 
recommended. ftflS^ 






12a 



Education 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



SPELLING FAIR 

£25,99 EUROPRESS SOFTWARE 



It's well known that spelling is a 
major problem with school children 
and particularly the spelling of certain 
words like 'weird' and 'ceiling'. This 
selection of useful games aims to 
help that parti cu a If problem, using a 
fairground setting for the tesls. 

Starting wilh tha Coconut Shy, 
you are shown a selection ol letters 
on the from of coconuts, within which 
is a word. At the boitom of the 
screen you are shown the meaning 
of the word, and you have to knock 
off the extra letters leaving only the 
required ones. After that there's the 
Word Juggle, where iwo jugglers 
rearrange letters to form words; the 




Mechanical Grab, where you can 

practise prefixes and suflixes; and 
even learn about homophones 
{words that sound the same, like 
'Where' and 'wear') in the Haunted 
House, 

Each game is played across three 
levels of difficulty, and offers small 
bonuses for success as part of an 
incentive package. For example, in 
the 'Test your strength' game, after 
four bells have been wrung people 
step out from behind the posts and 
burst into applause. Similarly, in the 
coconut shy, the coconuis dance 
when you get words right. Get ihings 
wrong, and you get to see an amus- 
ing animation, but 
this is done in a 
way thai isn t dis- 
heartening. 

All in all, it's a 
well put together 
package lor the 
slightly older 
group (7 to 13), 
and it tackles the 
problem well. 
Once again, it 
comes from the 
Fun School learn, 
so it cant be bad. 



NODDY'S 

£25.99 JUMPING BEAN 

In the world of children's games, 
can any license be as sought after 
as ihe Noddy one? Well, yes pmba 
bly, I don't know about you, but 
from where I'm standing Noddy's a 
little old hat. Still, that didn't stop 
Jumping Bean picking him up and 
sticking him in quite an inventive 
piece of software. 

Aimed at children between the 
ages of three and eight. Noddy's 
Playtime aims to leach the basic 
skills, such as picture recognition, 
along with some simple logic abili- 
ties, This is done through a series 
of eight games, based in various 
buildings around Toytown, In the 
farm, you have to match Ihe fronl 
and rear ends of animals so that 
they'll get fed. In the factory, you 
are shown five similar items and a 
picture of the kind you want, e.g. an 



ice cream with a red cherry but no 
wafer. Using the mechanical crane 

you have to knock off any wrong 
items, 

The whole thing is linked by 
Noddy driving around Toy town, 
and this is full of nice little key- 
board touches, such as pressing 
the 'B" key to cause the car to 
brake sharply, complete with 
sound effects. However, this is 
where I think ihings might be a lit- 
tle too much for younger children. 
It's a large map, and you're given 
no indication of where the games 
are. You can choose to skip to the 
games, but that removes the Con- 
tinuity. Other than that, it's a line 
piece of software, and one stimu- 
lating enough to capture the 
imagination at the older end of 
the age group, 





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PAINT AND CREATE 

£25.99 EUROPRESS SOFTWARE 



This is a superb piece of software 
and one that no five year otd should 
be without. Rather than trying to tech 
children, this package aims to stimu- 
late their imagination with a. 
collection of games designed to aid 
creativity. Put together by the Fun 
Shoal team, you'd expect it to reek of 
quality anyway. And H does, with pol- 
ish liberally slapped all over it. 

The menu is a large four-screen 
picture, filled with objects that ani- 
mate when you click on ihem. such 
as ihe sun, a cat, a dog and a tele- 
phone, The games themselves are 
easy to find - to play the jigsaw you 
click on the teddy piecing together a 
jigsaw. The large bright graphics are 
something smaller children will iden- 
tify with and I leel thai the package 
could be just as useful for children 



younger than the five years recom- 
mended. 

As well as the jigsaw section, 
you've got a mini art package tor 
budding Leonardos, Monsier Maker, 
where you can put body parts 
together lo create the scariest mon- 
ster possible, and then run a little 
animation to see how scary it really 
is. There's a Card Creator, where 
you can piece together 
Christmas/Birthday cards and then 
print them out, but my favourite has 
lo be the Teddy Karaoke. Here you 
can put a band together by picking 
Ihe instalments and musicians to 
play them, select the music for them 
to play, and then put them on Top of 
the Teds" to see how well they do. 
Essentiai software, 



C^k 



10 OUTOF 10 ENGLISH 

£25.95 10 OUT OF 10 



Meeting the demands of Ihe National 

Curriculum, whilst retaining the 
emphasis upon the more traditional 

elements ot Engiish language teach- 
ing, is the aim of this game-centered 
package, 

Unusually, perhaps, this product 
is not aimed: at a highly specific age 
range, instead, it is ability-based, 
with the level of difficulty of the puz- 
zles embracing junior school 
standard as well as that ot kids 
preparing for their GCSEs. The six 
games test the user in ways that will 
undoubtedly stretch most people's lit- 
eracy skills: spelling, identifying. 
collective nouns. Spotting missing 
words or letters, matching rhyming 
words, and so on, form the content ot 
the puzzles on offer. It is even possi- 
ble for intrepid parents or teachers to 
write new questions for one of the 
games, enabling them to customise it 
to stress what they consider to be 
the most important points lor the 
child player to learn. The leaflet 
accompanying the game makes it 
clear thai the program aims to cover 
the long-familiar elements of lan- 
guage teaching, including 
punctuation, verbs, adjectives, 
nouns, sound patterns and ligures of 



speech. 

The games will appeal to kids 
who are devotees ol crosswords, 
and word search puzzles rather than 
the usual platform fare, bul quick 
reactions are still necessary to 
impress Ihe scoring system in many 
of them, 

Graphically unexciting and with 
unremarkable sound, this product 
nevertheless remains an interesting 
attempt to put vocabulary and gram- 
mar in a computer game context. 




129 



Cross Dosi f Croae PC £3*95 

*lknra(iHjr Amine la amulaftS a CO* PC and read and wrno US DOS Ihk 

pc task e 34 - 95 

Ntom an Arngi » urmiUls- aVGA«EGAPCardH»<S*»'*aMSDuu 

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Power &>mpu1ing 

4MB, Clock. Mo FPU E2O9.00 

4MB, Clock, 20 MHr Sfl«S1 £290,00 

4MB, Clock, 25 MHi6*ftS1 £315.00 

4MB. Clock, 33 MHz 68881 E325.W 

allB.CIOCli. ID MHz 68881 £335.00 

Bruce Smith Book* 

A120O Insider Guide £13,95 

A 1 EM Insider Culda Halt S1*p* £13.95 

A 600 Insider Guide n £13.95 

Amiga Gamers Guide ,..-.£13.95 

AtumUH lnsld*r Guide £14.95 

A-Z of Workbench .£14.05 

Mastering Amiga Amos £16.95 

Mastering Amiga Ai-exx £15.95 

Mastering Amig* Assem tiler £23.95 

Meeterlng Amis* Beginners - £16.96 

Mattering Amiga C - - £lfi.95 

Mastering Amiga Prlntem £1-8-95 

Mastering Amiga Syslem i2H.95 

Mattering Amiga Workbench Z E1M8 

Mattering AmfgaDo* 3-D Referent* £?0 9b 

Mattering AmiHaOo* 3.0 Tutorial £20-95 

Mattering AmiBaDos 2 Volume 1 ,£20.95 

lAmlgaDoi 2 Volume 2 £18,95 



X-Cnpy Pru1es5IOn<1l E24 99 

Hordwwu ^nrs Mirlware- laleul version 

Directory Opus E49-95 

Coiriirohensl** ou* uton- - aho* pHutm. play rnuM. hen iim Htoa, back- 
up. lAaroh 

IrvnovalOOlH ■ ■ .EW.aS 

Glgenwm £51.99 

Hypereache £37.55 

Disk wirJiing Id ipsml i* h*rd dm« DV 22 Must ikwieett, 320 limn! 

Quarterback Tools Deluxe , E79-95 

AdvwwwJ dsk doctor 

Chjirt.rfc.ck £40.95 

Back-up find archival SYBleni 

Video Beck-up System £54,96 

6au** lip tt^pHK and hard Hi*** onto VMS video «apas 



Sbass Personal 4 S&.95 

F-nrmi DoaiajW afld My rational da lflb*» 

SoasePro4v1-3 £239.95 

FuHy ratslioiial daiariK* w*i Databa** Uanngomart Larmuaon 

GB F10U*a Hue , E39 9S 

Plan (fliir roula trwn and » afly"nai» n DM UK 

M.ilstwtPiira -.E3995 

MutlC Librarian ,. .£24-95 

Plants For All Seasons ,., .,£24.95 

Slarel .ucfio douce dlWofE. wltti noanka 15 ASWc */i Dopt PncdosMinnl 

Epson GTfiSOO Scanner Software... £99 95 

Sharp J3UOO Driver £99.95 

Sharp. JX3O0 Driver.....,, ■ £399.00 

Abeke* Driver £128.95 

Polaroid 0-3000/5000 Driver £1.28.96 

Lasergnephlts LFfl Driver . £129.95 



ACM English eg* 11-« - E1&.50 

ADI English ape 12-13 £18-50 

ADI English age 13-14 £18.50 

ADI English age 14-15 ..£18.50 

ADI French age 11-12 E18.50 

ADI French age 12-13 _ C1850 

AH French age 13-14 „,.,. E1B5C 

AM French ag* 14-15 - E1B 50 

ADI Jnr Cc-unlin-g age 4J5 £1599 

ADi Jrw Counting lg* 8JT E1699 

ADI Jnrfteadling age4& £16 99 

ADI Jnr Heading ag* flO" £15.99 

ADI Maths age 11-12 £18.50 

ADI Maths age 12-13 .£18,60 

ADI Maine age 13-14 ■ .£13,50 

ADI Mains age H-15 £19.50 

Fun School 4 age 5-7 M&.5Q 

Fun School 4 egg 7-11.. E16.50 

Fun School 4 age J-S Eia5Cl 

Fun School Special: Merlin Mtlh E19.9& 

Fun Sclirjol SpecJal: Palnl/Cnule £19.99 

Fun School Special; SpsHlnaFelr £19,99 

Kid PI* 

FainT packers lix kids ■ ...■,- .-E21 .SH 







Aniwerbech Fact 500 Math £16.33 

Answerback Feci 500 Spei" E16.K 

Anawwteacle Junior - £16.32 

AnawurtMiek Senior (eg* «•) £16.32 

French Ml*treas .£16.32 

German Meaner £1 63z 

Italian Tutor £1632 

Malha Ad^entura E21.99 

SpanlshTulor - £16-32 

Mega Math* |A Level} £18.50 

Micro English (10 GCSE) - Elfl.SO 

Micro- French (to GCSE) Clfl.se 

Micro German (to GCSE) C1B.50 

MImo Mains fto GC5E) C1H.-50 

Micro Spanish (10 GC3E) =18,50 

Micro Science. . . E21-99 

Primary Mallis (ape 3-12) £19.50 

Reading ; Writing (3+) £19.50 

Noddy'* PlevUma (age 3-7) £24.99 

Noddy's Bkg Adventure lege 3-7) ....£24.99 

Dislant Suns v4J £39.95 

jkeUUiiiy 






Arena Accounl* .E8S.BS 

I-UI accounla pfWWflo ** the .*miyi 

Cwhbook Combo .,,£59,99 

Day By Day 

p«fy and poracnol Offlanwr £24 99 

Hn mo Accounts -. E35 99 

Horns Accounts 3 (Money Matters) £39.99 

Personal Finance ManagW Plus , -..£32.95 

Konuli** at >cur;»Bh! 

system 3 E 49.99 

Mrchikas for 1*81*0**. sales ejdoof and Block cenfrai 

SyslemSE , E54.99 



XL I.TfiMB Power Drive axlBmal. . . £79 95 

XL 1.7BMB Powsr Drive Inietnel . £79.95 

PC98QB Power Drive £69.96 

PC8HB Power Drive X-Copy + Cyclone £99-95 

170Mb OVERDRIVE Hard Drive £319-00 

250Mb OVERDRIVE Hart Drive . . £369.00 



Art EKpraaakma £145,00 

Reel 3D Classic , £69,95 

Ccat «n*amn 3D randarfltl 9Pd rn j tracilt) 

Real 3D V2 £359.95 

Uera-d0werri.il nraloflsniiaJ quelty 3D ranooriiS 

Cahqar 54 PAL -C60.00 

Callgari Broadcast 3.1 . .£349.99 

Artemalh™ Teimirea 3D vol 1 £39.89 

Add d*ewl ratinrev and 1iMl6" 1r- Haal 30 and IftMOne 

Alternativfl Tenturea 3D vol 2 .£39-99 

Essence v2 ,„..„,„,.„ ,C*ll 

Teniiras let ImauiiiS 

Ari Depsrlmenl ProleMlonel £145.00 

Art D*pl Pro Converskjn Kit , .£59.99 

Umi4 snri £*ro Dirrecarfl Mae rcnnalt fi >j1 D*pa*tm6iir PiraosBiurtal 

Doug's Pro Control ESS .95 

Esien pfotawmg iirm cod (Of » Pro and Momn FkJ* 

Morph Plus £145.00 

Twin. <Hvr>n. mori* and warf knagfli! - wtcJi Madonna kjm rrlo Mr T 

TruePrint 24 P45.96 

PI .el 3D Pro t AnlnvworkBPro £129.95 

[:<B*to * irroflBS forn reratch. rx fromZD [**">•■. Ih™ arwm«l»tham 

Presentation Ml*l«r £234.95 

Video- Director 

Vinsn tdrnrg E1 19-95 

Professional Orwwv3.0 £99 95 

T#ke 2 Anlrneuone 

M *h3 Igr oi Emrxf n *Xtf own Iwrm £39.95 






Mini Ottice 

VrF, sprud B^sec and 4aUba» i 



. !T39 BS 



.£38 on 



Bars&Pifw^ Prureasional C199.95 

Trw rnoM rkywuriul sariuonuar s*!Mj eodkl awawa+i kf. 

BersaPlpes Pro Upgrad* vl-vS: £99.00 

Crsalrvlty Kit ■ E 29 " 

internal Bovnde E»-» 

Multimedia Kit £29.99 

MuaicB<ja A ■ ,-£29.99 

MUBlcBoaB ■ C26.m 

Pre Studio Kll £32 95 

Rules for Toole £29 99 

One-Stop MuateShocr £499.99 

Tha Muruvfl EUU Ptntou* 09P rjn a cant ever * Meg oi ™nflalHfl8 S 
urrolesan ROM 

Pe(chMelst<K £?»* 

PakJi Ikirarian rrjr hatll, OrnmH tor msny sound mo#|l« "nd handea 
9^-kny. djrrpt 

SuperJAMrv1.1+ E74.95 

Tl * iiAS't way bo mo*# mu«a;l 

SuperJAM! Upgrade vl .0*1.1 - 

SynchPro 

Hyncoraniso rrtcl *rrh munmmaft . . E151.9C 

Tflpla Play P1u« ..E159.9S 

Wiir fliis 3~»jtWIDI airafiaca. hlv* Up t!l *B rJiamol MB3I Cdipositiana 

Ameea E79 " 

Sound sampler * \tH% mkanaca 

Clarfly IB E129 95 

1flW»mpaKW#iBoe»Si>e 

Pro Midi NllBrlaca •»»-« 

Tha pin^'p^nnnanoii m*df irii»ff*a. 

Slerao Maslur l,_ £rW.« 

R. brl &ound wjir^itar 

MegaMlx Master E29.95 

Sound samplino diHjdqfial arrecb 

MFG ALD50U ND E3495 

Delu at Muilc ConslruCHon Kll rt £69 95 

Long BW-uilft^ rvn* 1 iMiraiari 

Miracle Piano £259.96 

Laam IB •sad and ptay nutkl ttien wraa oollirrid I* ifnuf iaquanoar w*i 
Ihis lull siaj MCH keyboard and aoepar? 

Teehnoaound Turbo 2 £34.95 

Lfleel laann ci INa t*t* weng aampie-. Ssmptodkact m herd DM 









AmlhM 

Tha BOS, iwlwonuraj K*flj*i IKV Km *naja. InHudeS cabin. Vdu need 

ra^Mllof*aCnArnkjain1nBno(F0fii ■ £47.95 

Art EEpreaakHia E145O0 

pjaaing 

BrilH.no* £1«-95 

h (anlflsiirr 32 hi parri aaekage 

Deluxe Paint 4.5 AGA £74.95 

Deluxe Vtdeo III .£79.95 

Deluxe Flint 4.1 STD £*^-99 

The ta+aul v#tuCii tor rton-AGA mftCflaT»5 

PrfffeHHWf«*l Dnwv3i.tr - C&&:S5 






Cygrius Ed Professional *3J EB9.95 

Amo* ProfeBakanal £35.99 

Amot ProlaaalonBl Compiler £24 95 

Easy Arnoa £29.95 

Amo* 3D £29,95- 

BHjc , £49.95 

DeVPao J £51,95 

Exl*nd .£24,95 

SAS CVer 6.3+ .£239.00 

Pascal "985 

Power Windows. - £69 95 

C««DoV2.5 £99 95 

HtiiLiriks EdHtanB 1.1 - - £69.95 












Maxiptan 4 



..£29.95 



mm 

Edllmate E1»*-» 

Qnlral your w0*0 a-gnn your Amiaa urtd add «mnd vm *U fflleng board. 
IrcUfdu oablai and aorworfl 

Power Ofev Scola Scanner v3j0 £124.95 

Colour Power Scanner - £249.95 

Video Maslar £69.95 

AMO only Samplo Hind giab. mdoc. meno 

Epson GTB5O0 Colour Scanner £759.00 

* hiu> gj»lr> JW. Malbod HJlOW wsunnar. *Wud«a f SDTj fcarmar auil- 

Heek 

Video Back-up SySlem £54.95 

Rnoks up your t1ogp*..rind hnntdiivuB OfYkJ VWy Midaa lupus 

R*rXl*l* *HQ6 S-VHSG*nJock £499.00 

Rgndale BBD2 FMC Cflnlock £159 95 

Amerg* Genloc*: wilh feoertvlpe control £ 1 9S.O0 

Vldl Amkj* 12 ■ -.-"4.95 

iVabt lull ocitinr magei Irom a rtdw muicb ki irtdef una cocond 

Vldl 12 H*»l Time £159.00 

Peal Iim* 1! 01 Ir.vnn grabbei 

Vtcll 34 R**l Time E23S.M 

Gran 2* Or colour map n rutil lima 



Big Artemalti/e Seraller .„..,. 

Big Alternative St holler 2 

Broadcast Tltler 2 Super HI Re* 
Font Enhancer A Fool Pack voM-i2 
tat BriifidLu.tl Tiller 
Montage. . , , ,. 

34 tri AtiA Tiling 

Seal* 600 HT100 

Stall MullUMdl* HH210 

Seal* MM30D 



sas.m 

..£189.99 

..£119.99 
..£299.99 

....£72.95 
..E149.9S 

. £349.95 



Distant Sun* v4.J .£3995 

5e*rt*ry Anliriolor v4 £49.95 

Vrtti Pro *3.0 £49.95 

AriA (^rftjle IBilurM .3D d-lilscarws 

Vista Pro upgrade v2 - 3.0 £30,00 

Makepalh for Vlata Pro .624.96 

Anmnlo □ pmrh Hirnunh j*niif Vi$tfl Fug 3D Iftntfgcftpe ■»■ 

Terraformtor Vista Pro.., £24.95 

Vials Sc-apemafcef 3.0. E59 95 



Wordworth j.g a&A ,.„ 

The Puhllihw .,.„. ., 

PralaaaJonal Papa v4+ 

p*aet*n*f va 

p*a*nnHm v3.o 



can 

£29.99 

£109.99 

, £41.99 

£249.95 



T V p«Smilr> 99.95 

Fom oiifcQrier 

Final Writer £39.99 

Final Copy II UK £94.09 

PenPad UK £29 00 

Salt Faces Vol 1 

FontetorFiralCqjy , £45 95 

Sotl Faces Vol 2 ., IMS 95 

Sotl Facet Vd 3 E45.95 

Sofl FttW V044 .£45.95 

TfusPrlrtt 24 E45.S6 

Turfreprr.nl Professional £34.« 



Degeneration .£29-99 

Oscar .Csjl 

Now Thai' a Whst I Call Game* , , .£19.99 

Now Thai a What I Call harness. , ,,.£19.99 

Plnbeil Fantasies £» 99 

James Pond 2 ,,„„.„„„. , E29 99 

Diggers ,„ .,, ....Call 

Sleepwalk* E29.99 

Wh*4*'t Voyaga - £25M 

OvwkilVLuna'C .£29.96 

S*ii*lbl* Soraief £24.99 

Z«l £29.99 

Troll* _ £2B.<» 

Deep Core £25.99 

Morph £29.99 

Deriojarourft Street* , , ,£29.99 

Total Carnage „„„,.,„„„„ .,... ,,,,£29,99 

Mean Arenas ,„„„... ......Can 

Bsavera „,,„,.,,„,„...-„...„...-., £29.99 

International Karate Plus ■ ■■■■ „, £14 99 

E14.99 

, , E14 99 

, E1499 

„ , ..E29 99 

, ,.„.„„.„ E25.99 

, E34.99 

.£29.99 



Myth 

Super Putty 

Nln|a3 

Bubble end Squeak 

K24rj 

Jurassic Park 

LlnteOlYU 



Legend ol Sorasll Call 

Keol 2 , ..J229.99 

Mlerototm £29.99 

Wintur Super Sports £29.99 

lelut Turbo Trilogy ES4.99 

S**»n Satas of Jombela £29.98 

Arabian Nigtila £14.99 

Traps end Treasuras £14.99 

Tie Break £14.99 

Ryder Cup Golf £29.99 

HaBch Out for Gold ,..„.„„, £29,99 

Surf Ninjaa .__. £29 99 

Alfred Chicken £39 99 

Casires Z £29 99 

Lord ol the Kings 2 £2999 

Fury of the Furrtas. ,.,.„.„., „„,„.„.„.„.,.E20.99 

Oonk - Special Edition J29.99 

Guineas Z ,...,...£29.99 

lnaighl Technodogy . . ,,. .,.,.. .,, £33.99 

Super Methane Brother* £29.99 

Defender cl lha. CrO»m 3... „.,.,.,,,,. £26.99 

Ceaser Deluie^Cobort 2 £34.99 

Qreller'* Encyclopedia £134.99 

Trlwlel Pursuit Call 

Human* 112 , £29.99 

Syndicate Cal 

Hum For Red October £29.99 

Liverpool Football. £29.99 

Shadow* «l In* Wind Call 

Labrynlh CaJ 




HOW TO ORDER and PAY 

Cheque made payable to "Emerald Creative 
Please allow at least 7 working days lor 
cheques to clear, Use the order form attached 
or make your own order lorm giving all the 
information we require, and post to: 

Emerald Creative Technology Ltd 

Rapid House 

!:.4 War die Bank 

Wimbledon, London 

3W19 1DW 

Credit Card- Use the order term attached or 

make your own form giving all the information 
we require, and either, post to the above 
address, or fax Emerald Sales direct on: 

FAX: 0&1 71EHW77 

or telephone the Emerald Sales lines on: 

TELEPHONE: OEM 715-8866 

and have all of the information ready. 

IM PORTA NT: We will authorize and bill your 
credit card when we are able lo ship you prod- 
uct from stock and process your order, not 
before. 

PRICING 

All pricing in this catalogue includes VAT. 
Carriage is added according to the following 
charges. We reserve the right lo change 
prices. However you will be informed of any 
price change before your order is accepted. 

CARRIAGE CHARGES 

Post and Packaging charges within (he UK 

are as follows: 

Normal delivery is £2.50 
.Registered post is an additional £0.55 

Next day courier is £4.95 inc VAT within the 
UK Mainland, but someone must be ihere to 
receive the parcel, or else extra charges will 
incurr. Please ask for pricing to send an order 
overseas. 

PROBLEMS 

Faulty product will be replaced or repaired, at 

our discretion, within 30 days of purchase. 

Phone us and we will tell you what to do, No 
refunds can be given at any time, unless we 
cannot repair your faulty product. Keep your 
Purchase Invoice. 



o 



m 



37 




m 



m 



> 



J3 




> 




P 



m 



081 715-8866 





eENYME OF TEG 



WTS Electronics Ltd, Chaul End Lane, luto 




32-bit 68020 Full power 
•On site warranty 
■Two Python joysticks 
•Free Paint package software 

* Mouse mat 

*A1 200 Standalone 
•A1200 with 20MB 
•A120Q With 40MB 

* A1 200 with 60MB 

* A1 200 with 80MB 
*A12QQw«th 120MB 

■A1 200 with 2Q0MB 



£274 
£354 
£399 
£424 
£439 
£509 
£599 




A1200/A600 Hard Drives 



Amiga 500 Hard Drives 



Monitors 




•I. .-, •■■■ ih-Lj upy ■ 

• Full instructions and cablet whers v«ceasary 

• All drivsa supply with formalin 
instructor* a«d wftwara 

• Fraelittinu snails bte 

£85 



• 20MB HD Upgrade 

• 40MB HO Upgrade 

■ 60MB HD Upgrade 

■ B0M&HD Upgrade 

• 12DMBHD Upgrade 

• 200MB HD Upgrade 



£135 
£154 
£169 
£249 
£329 



A12007A600 Memory Upgrades 



•A1203 PC 1204 4MB + dock a,tn,<nn«i £198 

• ProRarn PCM-ClA ASOO/A1200 £1 ** 

• PrnRam PCM-C IA A6OTA1 200 £ 1 72 

• PfoRam 1 MB AfiOO £3' 

• A 1200 Real Time Clock £1 T 



High Quality GVP Hard Drives 

A5O0 A1500 

120MB £429 f3B2 

B00MB £999 *«2 

1G6 £1199 £1142 

Internal Hard Drives for A50Q 

• Easy to install - full instructions 

• ICO iKhroiogy 

• Pro internal 20MB hard dm* £175 
» Pro irwnal 40MB hard drive E24S 

• Pro internal BOMB hard dnve £295 

• Pro internal 120MB hard drive £335 

• Pro internal 300Mb hard drive £4SS 
■ A&70 CD drive £1*9 



L 



Workstations 



Peripherals 



Scanners 




-Economically sound 

• Facilitates up to three external floppy 
drives 

•Made in the UK 

• Strong and robust 

• Aesthetically pleasing 

• Keep your desk neat and tidy 
Supplied complete and assembled 
with free mouse mat 

£36 

£36 

£36 




• A50C Workstation 

• A60Q Workstation 

• A12O0 Workstation 



* Workstation Coverall dust covers £5 



1 00 C apacity likable di sk box £5.99 

Squick mouse £13.99 

Mouse mat £1.99 
TDK high quality D$D ( 1 0> disks £9.99 

Computer Mall DSD (10) disks £6 

Jet Rghter joystick £13.99 

Apache joystick £6i99 

Python joystick £9,99 

Zipitick joystick £14.99 

Screen Beat speakers £29 

Zi-Fy speakers £39 
A5Q0/A6O0/A1 200 Dust covers £4.99 

A50Q Modulator £36 

Mini Office package £54.99 

Supra 2400 Modem £89 

Su pra Fax Plus Modem £ 1 48 

Supra v. 32 BIS Fax Modern £358 



N -v 




• AKows in*age processing in a useful and 
unique fashion 

• Comes complete with 
operation manual 

■ One of the fastesi growing applications 
for home and professional users 

•High specification coupler with cost 
effective pricing 

• Power Handling Scanner 

• 64 grayscales 100-400 DPI 
•Thru 'port to printer 

• Fully comparable with Delux Paint 4, etc. 
» Advanced sodwgre 



Amiga 4000 Packs 



■ AG A Chipset 

■ 68030/40 processor 

• Co-pro option 
•2MB/4MBRAM 

. A40TO 030 wilh SOM B HD & 2 MB £899 

• A4QQ0 030 with 80M B HD Si 4MB £999 
■A40QQ03dwith12OMBHD&4MB £1089 

■ A40QO 040 with 120MB HD & &MB £1999 



A1200 Dynamite Pack 



■ Simply add to pack price £49 

. CD3a £2*4 



• Philips 8B33MKII Monitor £189 

• Commodore 1084s £174 

•When purchasing with 

an Amiga deduct £19 from above 

pricing 
•Dust cover for the above £5 



•Power Hand Scanner v3.0 



£96 



VGA /Multisync Monitors 




• 14'720" Super high rejection colour display 
« Professional IBM compatibility 

• Complete with cable 
» Full UK warranty 

• Tilt a swivel stand 

• A 1200 SVGA Monitor (Displays high 
productivity modes) £Z28 

• A1200 SVGA+ Monitor {Medium resolu 
tion, displays all modes high and low) £274 

• A 1200 SVGA+ Monitor (HJojiieHHuuon. 
displays all modes) £369 

• A1 200 SVGA plus 20" Monitor (Displays 
all modes ideal for OfP.CAD etc.) £1 044 



Pro ROM Swapper 




'Power Hand Scanner Col cur £226 



• Swap between Kickstart chips 

• Fits A500, A500+, A6G0,A1 500 

• Auto swapping via keyboard control 

• Flexible cable allows the swapper to 
work in conjunction with 
aecellerators etc. 

• Simple to fit -full instructions 

• Pro ROM Swapper £1 8 

• Pro ROM Swapper + \ .3 ROM £37 

• Pro ROM Swapper + 2.04RQM£40 
■ Workbench 2.04 plus manuals£49 






- CM«nn»l <^Ip « Seasonal Sale . Seasonal Sale . Seasonal Sale . Seasona 



33MKSAL ESKSEBJLBIN& 




Est. since 

1984 

O N, BEDS, LU4 8EZ TEL (0582) 491949 (6 LINES) "^ 





Pro Agnus 2MB 



* Pr ovides a full 2MB of C hip Memory for the 
Amiga 500 and A1 500/2000 • Designed and 
built in England • Supplied wiih S375 Obese 
Agnus * Indurjes 2Mb Memory an board in 
the form of low power Zipi ■■ AllOtf/S the pro- 
cessing of elaborate animation and sound 
sampling * Provides (he same man., chipnwm- 
ory as (he A300WA6OQ SSOOt ■ Increases 
.addressable memory space from 9MB to 
10M6 • Complete witfi full instructions jnd 
flying leads • British made 

• Pro Agnus 2MB £139 
(Free fitting available - Ftipne for details) 




AS0O Memory Expansions 



A500 Pro-RAM 0.5 Meg. Upgrade 

•Allows 1MB software to run 

* Chip memory compatible 

• British made 



'Without clock 
'With dock 



£16 
£19 



A500 Pro-RAM 1.5 Meg Upgrade 

■Gives a full 2MB of memory £74 

A500+ 1 MB Meg U pq rad e £29 . 9 5 



High Current Power Supply Cumana 3.5" External Drive 



Printers 





u 



x _^^-^" 



* Allows the addition of peripherals 
without damage to computer or power 
supply 

• Why risk damaging your expensive kit 
when one simple investment will ensure 
total peace of mind now and for the 
future 

• Switch mode design 

* Full crow bar projection 

* British made 

* A60O Power supply unit £44.95 

• A500 Power supply unit £44,95 

* A590 Power supply unit £44.95 

• Al 200 Power supply unit £54.95 

• A20CHJ Power supply unit £99.95 




■ High Quality 

* Renowned and proven reliability 

* Top notch specification 
•Anthdick 

* Long moulded cable 

* Slimline design 

* High impact plastic 

* Cumana external drive 

* Cumana external drive 
+ 100 capacity disk box 

* Cumana external drive 

+ TOO disk box + 20 blank disks 

* AS0Q/AS00+ 

Infernal replacement disk drive 



£59 
£62 
£68 
£46 



•High quality premium range of Arruga 

printers 
•Two year manufacturers warranty 
■Complete with cable to Amiga 500 
•Cttteeri registered lor Dealer plus service 

•Swift 1200+ £129 

i9 pm SO column, 1 iA epstfrsFL 3D NLQ JKD-3 AiMf; 

•Swift 90 Colour £168 

|9pn. BOcAimn, 2t6cwdrah. 54 LCHSdrjquar mods 

•Swift 200 £186 

(24«n.B0oalLirire, ?16 cps rJrati, 72 LQ Jl3dB quel mo* 

■Swift 240 Colour £259 

I2.4pin.80 cAjfWi. 240 cps tfaft, 30 LQ *3dB <u»1 mods 

•Swift Pro Jet £299 

(Wcokimn, 50 noma pmt. 380 eas draft, UOLfl. HP 
ri-inUlinnere blHfo, 2 Ituvl" uprliwlln,"" ■ 




■WIS have sole, distribution nghts from 
Americas biggest Commodore chip 
distributor 

• Workbench 2.04 Kit £78 

• Kickstart 20,4 £24 
' Kickstart 1.3 £26 

• Kickstart ROM Swapper £18 

■ Fatter Agnus 8372 £49 

• Obese Agnus 837S £54 

• High Res Denise £29 

• 1MBx9Simms(3chfp| £29 
< 1MB x 4 Zips £14 
■8520 CIA £13 



sales hotline 0582 491949 (6 lines), 0480 471 1 17{24nr>, fax on 0582 505900 

■ ^ Credit Card orderir 9 bv Phone is easy. Simply phone our sales hotline quot.no. your credit card number., expiry date, name and address and 
' the products you wish to order and we'll do the rest. Alternatively write the above details on your letter when ordering by post. 

When ordering by post in cheque form please write your cheque card guarantee number on the reverse of the cheque and send alonq with 
i — L! — I your order. Postal Orders are also accepted. 

NO DELIVERY CHARGES TO UK MAINLAND. MINIMUM ORDER AMOUNT £15.00. 

Should you wish your order to be sent by courier service please add £5. This method includes Comprehensive insurance. 

WARRANTY: One year return to base (excluding chips). 

ONE YEAR EXTENDED WARRANTY: Available on all products (excluding chips) at 10% of purchase price when ordering. 

whereto Find us! 



Head Office 

WTS Electronic Ltd 

ChauJ End Lane 

Luton 

0582 491 949 



Computer Mall Bedford 

No. 16 Downstairs 

The Bar pur Centre 

Bedford 

0234 2 132 2 B 



Computer Mall St. Neots 
Neuf 

Priory Mall Shopping Centra 

St, Nk-oti 

0480 471117 



Computer Mall Hertford 
49 Railway St. 

Hertford 
□392 503606 



Computer Mall Dunstable 

S4 High Street North 

Dunstable 

Bedfordshire 

0582 475747 



^s^^rsisrgrs^r^ 



onal Sale • Seasonal Sale * Seasonal Sale . Seasonal SMt> . <ie;^nnal c.al* - 






AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 



Add-ons 




H I ALS 



One of the things that makes the Amiga so powerful is the ease with which it can be upgraded. You can beef 
up even the humblest A500 until it's capable of giving the revered 486 PC a run for its money. Each Amiga 
has its own unique qualities, and requires its own add-ons. Broadly speaking add-ons fall into two cate- 
gories: plug-in cards for big box machines such as the At 500 andAAQOO, and machine specific peripherals 
for the smaller machines. Most of the time f peripherals for the bigger machines are interchangeable 
between the A4Q0Q, A3000, A2000 and A1 500, therefore we've reviewed stuff for them in one section, 
whilst looking at products for the other machines in another section. Modems and printers are compatible 
with all machines, and so they form the dividing tine between the two sections. Read on... 

RAM CARDS 

Extra memory can greatly increase the range of things 
that you can do with your Amiga. Most machines are 
supplied with Chip RAM only, so buying a Fast RAM 
upgrade will not only increase the amount of data 
that you can store, it will even increase the speed at 
which that data is manipulated. 

MB M501 

£19.99 - INDI DIRECT - 0543 419999 

The A 501 plugs ir>to - re trap 
door slol of the A500. It contains 
5 1 2k or one megabyte of Fast 
RAM and includes a battery 
backed clock which is useful if 
you own a hard drive. It also 
features an on/off switch so that 
it can be disabled for those rare 
games thai donl work ^^^ 
with Fast HAM. kT^jfc 

J A500-NotA500+ *4i£P 

2 MB PCMCIA CARD 





£11 9.99 -INM DIRECT 
0543 419999 

A12QQ and A600 owners can add 
Iwo types. nl RAM to (heir 
machines: internal cards which 
plug into the expansion slots 
underneath the computer, or 
PCMCIA memory Lhal plugs inlo 
the 'smart card' slot at the side. 

Although smart cards are only 
16-bit, and will thus slow an 
A1 200 down, they are convenient 
and extremely easy to fit. They're 
also extremely portable, for what 
it's worth! 

This card offers two 
megabytes of 1 6-bit RAM .^^^ 
A600 and A1200 only. /^ fej 

134 




MEGACHIP 2 

£ 1 59 - POWER COMPUTING - 0234 843388 

Chip RAM is essential for graphics and sound, and the more you have,, the 
more you can do. The Megachip lets you upgrade the A500, l&DG, 2000 or 
3.000 to a full two megs ol Chip RAM. 

II plugs into the Agnus slot ol your computer, and although it will invalidate 
your warranty, it's very easy to fit and is unlikely to cause you any problems. 

Once fitted, it will not interfere with any Fast RAM expansions that 
you may have. 
A500U, A 1500, A2OO0 and A30OO. 

A600 CARD 

£49*99 - INDI DIRECT 
0343 419999 

This card plugs into the expan- 
sion port ol the A600 and adds 
one meg of Chip RAM, bringing 

the machine's total up to two 
megs. It's small, it's 
easy to lit, it works. 
What else is there? 

PCI 208 

£99- £61 9 - POWER COMPUTING - 0234 843388 

A follow up to their popular PC12Q4 RAM card for the A1200. Power's PC12QS 
is probably the first card expandable to a full eight megs which does not con- 
flict with the PCMCIA slot. 

It comes with a clock in a variety of configurations starting al £99 for a 
beard with no RAM but a 68882 maths co processor running al 20MHz and 
ranging up to £019 for a fully populated eight meg board that includes a^^^ 
68682 maths co pro running at a lightning 50MHz. fe^^fe 

A 1200 only. 

PC 1 204 

£185.95-£339.95 - POWER COMPUTING - 0234 
843388 

The little brother to the PCI £08. tfie 1204 is supplied: with four megs of surface 
mounted RAM which means that it's likely to be tar more reliable than boards 
that use SIMMS or other socketed chips. 

The 1 204 is supplied with a battery backed up clock and again it's available 
with a variety of maths CO processors ranging upwards from a 2DMHz 6BS81 to 
a 50MHz 68882. 

The board is not expandable like the 1208, but it's still a very good solution 
for those who are certain that they won't need more than a total ol six 
megs of RAM. 
A 1200 only. 



Add-ons amiga buyers guide 94 



ALFA DATA RAM 



£1 1 5- £46 5 - GOLDEN IMAGE -081 365 1 102 

The Alfa Data RAM lor ihe A1 200 is unusual because it comes with al leasl one 
meg of RAM, and then you can still add another bur or eight megs on top of (hat, 
making it the only card to give odd number RAM totals. 

It's also unusual because it 
uses Zip chips instead of SIMMS. 
and Itiese have recently been 
slightly easier to get hold of. 

By now it will come as no sur- 
prise to learn lhat it also includes 
a battery powered clock and an 
optional maths FPL (co pro). 

If the extra meg of RAM is 
important, ihis seems a good 
option, but compare ihe price 
of SIMMS and Zips if you don't 
want a I uiiy populated 
unit just yet. 
A 1200 only. 




TURBOTECH 



£ 1 79.99 - SIREN SOFTWARE - 06 1 724 7S72 

Yet another trapdoor slot 

A 1200 RAM card, but the 
Turbotech doesn't come 
with room for an FPU, but 
it's a tad cheaper than 
some of the other cards. 
It comes with lour megs 
and a dock, and that's all 
there is to it really! 
At 200 only 




ACCELERATORS 

Advanced though the Amiga may be, it's beginning to 
look very sluggish compared to other computer plat- 
forms where substantially faster processors are now 
the norm. Of course, the Amiga also has advanced 
architecture with chips such as the Bl itter which help 
to compensate for its relatively slow CPU. But If 
you're still not satisfied, there's no reason why you 
can't increase the speed of your machine. 

ICD ADSPEED 

£1 19 - POWER COMPUTING - 0234 043300 

The Adspeed is the least expensive of all the upgrades reviewed here, but then of 
course, it's also the least impressive. It works with any Amiga that uses a sock- 
eted 68000 chip and simply plugs into the socket replacing the existing chip. 

Although it's still only a 63000 
itself, the Adspeed does run at 
14MHz. twice the dock speed of 
the slandard €8000. Contrary to 

^1 what you might expect this 
|._^ I does not product? a twofold 

If J I I increase in speed. In (act, at 

' 7*""*^ EL best, it gives you a 1 5-20% 

improvement 

Still, it's not particularly 
expensive and it's lairly easy to 




MICROBOTICS Ml 2 3 OX A 

£239.99- £71 1.19 - INM - 0543 419999 

The Mj1 230 is one of the teller A1 200 
boards in a market jostling with high 
quality kit. As with all A1 200 peripherals, 
you can choose the specification, rang- 
ing from a 40MH? 68ECQ30 accelerator 
with no RAM Of maths co pro for a very 
reasonable £239.99 and going up to a 
50MHi full 68030 accelerator with a 
63B82 maths co pro also oinning al the 
same speed and a hefty eight megs of 
RAM, 

In fact, it is possible to add up to 1 28 megs of RAM if you can find a single 
SIMM that large. In real terms the largest you'll be able to find is a 32 meg 
chip and that's likely to damage your wallel to the tune of well over £5000! 

It you choose the 50 MHz card* the processor includes a memory manage- 
ment unit which is necessary for running the virtual memory program 
Gigamem as well as programmer's tools such as Enforcer. 

The M123GXA plugs inlo the trapdoor slot so your warrranty 
remains intact, Al 200 only. 

GVPA1 230 TURBO 

£249- £499 - SILICA SYSTEMS - 081 309 1111 

The A 1230 was the lirst A 1200 accelerator to hit the streeis, and because of 

that it now looks ai little plain compared to the others which have enjoyed more 

development time. 

It offers a 40MHz &BEG030 accelerator with one or four megs of RAM and 

an optional maths co pro. Of course, it also includes a clock. 

Even without the FPU, it still accelerates the A1200 to approximately seven 

limes its normal speed, and this is the slowest A 1200 accelerator on offer! 
Of course, being GVP it means lhat the board is well built, and it's worth 

phoning Silica to see what cur- 
rent price offers are available as 
an upgraded version to this board 
is imminent- 

You can add up to 32 megs of 
RAM to the board via its two 
SIMMS slots. You need' to use 
GVP's proprietory chips which in 
turn means that they're no good 
lor anything else if you ever 
change computers. On the up 
side, the board does offer not 
one, but two SIMMS slots, so you 
can build up to 32 megs in two 
slightly more affordable 
16 meg chips if you like. 
A12QQ aniy. 




Mtt*Mfftt*MHtt*t«ff#»»»**ttt*fltt 



CSA 1 2 GUAGE 




fit. 

A50Q/+, 1500, 2000. 



£%%fc 



£499- £999 - OMEGA PROJECTS - 0942 982203 

For the real power user, the CSA 12 guage is the crerne de la creme of A1200 
accelerators, and in fact is likely to be the only peripheral you ever need! Well, 
not Itlerally, bul it certainly is a feature packed board. 

For starters, it contains a full €6030 accelerator running at a Spritely 
50 MHz It also gives you an optional &B882 maths co pro running al the same 
speed. On top of thai there's a SCSI interface that emerges from the back right 
of your Amiga (or underneath if you're scared of fosing your warranty), This 
interface will automatically configure 
itself as a SCSI 1 or SCSI 2 device 
according to the peripheral attached to 
it. Furthermore, ihe unit also contains a 
clock and a socket which will accept an 
ethernet'local Area Network chip so 
lhat the Amiga can be linked up to 
other computers including PCs. 

With the option to add up to 1 28 
megs Ol RAM, this board is completely 
unbeatable, although you may as well 
start applying for mortgage facilities 
now 'cause it doesn't come cheap, 

Absolutely my best recommendation 
if you can possibly afford it. 
A12QQ(wtlh a large wallet!) 




133 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 Add-OllS 



HARD DRIVES 

As the size and complexity of programs increases, it 
becomes less and less practical to load software 
frcm floppy disk, especially with titles occupying 
more than halt a dozen disks on a regular basis. A 
hard drive works like extra memory except its con- 
tents aren't lost when you turn the power off. 
Although they come in capacities as low as 20 
megabytes, I would strongly recommend that you 
ignore anything smaller than 40 megs. If you can't 
afford one of that size, then wait till you can. 

GVP HD8+ 

£199-311 20.1© - SIUCA SYSTIMS ■ 081 309 1111 

There are lots ol hard drives available for the A500. but tew come close to the 
high standards set by GVP. The HD8+ was Iheir first A5O0 dnve, and its Still 
selling extremely well, especially since the prices were drastically reduced. 

The drive plugs directly into the expansion skit at the side of your A5G0, so 
your warranty won't be affected. It 
comes pre -installed so it's simply a case 
Of plugging In and otf you go. 

It oilers extremely fast read and write 
speeds, and comes with the option to 
add up to eight meqs ol 1 6-bit RAM. It 
also includes a proprietory mini-slot into 
which which you can plug a 366 PC 
emulator costing as little as £150. 

Theres also a game switch wilh 
which you can turn the drive orf so that it 
doesn't conflict with your games.. The 
HDS+ is available in 42 and 1 05 ^_^ 
megabyte capacities. C*T*Sfr 

ASOQ/+. ^^7.., 

A530 TURBO 

£399-£l670.10 - SIUCA SYSTIMS - 081 309 1111 

The A530 Turbo is Simply the best drive that money can buy for the A500 and 
A500+. It includes the same superfasl drive leatured in the HD8+, and has the 
same plug in and go simpflicrty. However, what sets the AS30 Turbo apart is the 
fact that it includes a 6BECQ30 accelerator running at 40MHE and it can even 
support a 6896 1/2 maths co processor. In other words, with this drwe it's not just 

- your data transfer that's 
fast, your A500 gets turbo 
charged to speeds nearly 
asfastasan A400O'O4O. 

The drive also has room 
on it for up to eight megs of 
32-bit RAM and it's avail- 
able in capacities ranging 
between 42 and 240 
megabytes. Because It 
uses fast 32 brl memory 
chips, you can actually 
store your Amiga's operat- 
ing system in RAM and it'll 
run even taster. 

There's also the same 
mini-slot present on the HD8+. 
The game switch disables 
both the accelerator and the 
RAM which is a bit of a nuin 
sanqe, but other than that, (his 
drive is extremely ^^^^ 
hadtolaull C'A CR 

A500/A50Q+ 



DATAFLYER XDS 




£324.99- £449*99 - TRILOGK - 0274 691 1 1 5 

If you don't mind invalidating the warranty of your A&OO or 1200, you can add 
a really cheap three -and-a-half inch drive. 

Although the Dataflyer comes in a very nice external case, it still needs to 
be connected to your computer via the IDE interface. This results in a ribbon 
cable which can either trail out of the back of your computer, or tan exit 
through the PCMCIA slot (making it useless tor any other purpose). 

As wilh the Overdrive, because it mounts the IDE drive externally the 
Dataflyer can use the larger capacity and lower priced three-and-a-half inch 

drives. 

Tri logic can also offer you a fu rther two years warranty on your compute^ 

for only £27.99. 

The maximum data (rans- 
ler rate is limited to the speed 
ol the drive and the IDE inter- 
face, and mis means that the 
Dataflyer does tend to be 
slower than the Overdrive, 
although in the vast majority 
or cases it won't matter. 

Your choice is clear, do 
you want speed and ease of 
connection ordo you want a 
cheap, well designed drive 
with a good capacity? The 
Dataflyer is ottered in capaci- 
ties between 120 and^^^ 
420 megs. {*^^j>j 

A 600 and A 1200- ^4^0^ 






OVERDRIVE 

£189-£516 - SOFTWARE DEMON - 0736 331039 

The A1 200 and A600 both come with internal IDE interlaces so that you can 
immediately plug in any compatible two and a hall inch dnve and you're ready 
10 go with no more messing aboul The only trouble is, in order to plug a drive 
in you'll have to open Ihe machine, thus invalidating your warranty. 

Overdrive is the neatest solution, because it simply plugs into the PCMCIA 
slot at the side of the machine. Not only does your warranty stay intact, but the 
drives are more or (ess portable. 

Software Demon originally planned to distribute the drives without power 
supplies, but on Amigas that already use a lot ol peripherals potential prob- 
lems could develop meaning that you'd have to buy a power supply anyway. 
To avoid charging people extra they simply included a PSU with every drive. 

The drives come pre-installed with a three and a halt inch unit in capacities 
ranging between 4-rj and 426 megabytes. In operation they're extremely fast; 
in fact at least 50% faster than the GVP drives l love so much, and twice as 
fast as the standard Seagate IDE drive in my At 200. 

They can be plugged into the computer and unplugged even when the 
power is switched on. A special portable A600 version is available rf*^ 
which can be slipped into your pocket. \J^ffi 

A600andA1200, 



Add-OnS AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



MODEMS 



You can use your Amiga to talk to the rest of the 
world, and with modem prices plummeting there's 
never been a better time than the present. 

US ROBOTICS SPORTSTER 



£279.95 




FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE - 0532 31 9444 

Despite looking more- like a child's toy 
than a top end piece of professional 
equipment, Ibe Sportster still offers a bet- 
ter power to price ratio than any other 
modem reviewed here. 

It offers iransmission rates of 14,400 
baud with MNP5 and V42 error correc- 
tion. If linked to a similarly equipped 
modem, transmission rates of up to 
56.000bps are theoretically possible 
(although unlikely using a standard 68000 
based Amiga). . 

Extremely impressive al tk^Bfe 
such a reasonable price. x^fp 

ROBOTICS COURIER HST 
DUAL STANDARD 

£503.99 - FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE - 0532 31 9444 

The utlirnaie modem, but at a price. Standard data transmission rates of 
l6,S00bps make this the fastest modem reviewed, Rather cheaply built consid- 
ering its whacking price tag but one of its great advantages is the fact lhai it can 
be upgraded to the new VFC pro- 
tocol when it's released. This will 
push up transmission speeds to a 
hefty 28,800 bps. 

With V42 BIS, MNP5 and US 
Robotics' own HST standard, this 
is a device designed to link up with 
everything in the worid to offer the 
fastest possible communications, 

The top banana in terms of 
RAW data pumping power, 
but with an executive (*Tt£% 
price to match. \^jfp 

SUPRA V32BIS FAX MODEM 

£249.99 - HRST COMPUTER CENTRE - 0532 319444 

The best of the Fax modems at a reasonable price. The Supra v32bis chugs 
data at a healthy 14,400bps and has the added advantage of being able to send 
faxes as well Again it supports MMP5 and v42 so il will connect comfortably 
with all modern communication networks. 

It includes a nice matrix LED on the front to tell you what's happening, rather 
than relying on the uninformaBve single lights used by all the other modems. 
It's also very compact, and with a brushed aluminium case it seems more 
robust and better designed than US Robotics' equipment. Unfortunately that illu- 
sion is shattered by the 
fact that this modem is 
not even BABT 
approved and so cannot 
legally be used on the 
British phone network. 
Of course, it's not as If 
roving bands of telecom 
SWAT teams are likely 
to burst into your home 
!□ check, but-. 

If you don't mind tak- 
ing a walk on the wild 
side, this offers perhaps 
the best all-round 
value of any 
modem. 





fr|ja 




SUPRAMODEM 2400 

£74.99 - FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE - 0532 319444 

If your wallet is not very large and you can only look on at comms users in 
envy perhaps this cut-price half-pint can bring a gleam of hope to your eye! 

It comes supplied with all cables and is robust in censtruction, and very 
easy to use thanks to the comms software that First Computer Centre thought- 
fully bundle with it. 

Its speed of 2400 bps is extremely slow for anything except text transmis- 
sion or real-time conversation. For example,, a one megabyte program would 
take a little over SB minutes to download with this system, so if you expect to 
do a lot of up or downloading, then you really should save up for a laster 
modem. It'll pay lor itself in phone bills in no time al all. 

Nevertheless, for less than £80, you can sample the joys of the £T*^hk 
comms world - who knows you might even become a hacker! %^Jfp 



OiliH m-.MlfftH K hi M MI t Hf rti 



Unifi'im lint, iMPkitlm 

rh is ii 1 1— ip I <* «■■ 



ll iiH/fdE 15 wmu|B 



M llw, bh 11 K:5C 1! 



SLstHi al Birti u 14 mwtlf... Dllttt M, Jtlm, muMtllwt 



frri. 



M KM (NMBti In tptri 



I tl MM) R 



«ii]i''.lttliJU, itn Kfta. IT! <U-i. 

%\t II 1 [Wit I* IIS. 

JlKktl tint I npni 

initxr II nils i HUH %Wl \l ifilHj it, tvj l*t f»Li> F#iF ' r *ni 

,„, .ip,, *n\ lit l<-rf*i, iiJ tm ii i<Wli hrtuutoin). 



■' 



(id In thrtif 



NICOLA 

£29.99 - TRICKY 
0273 885547 

Of course it's all fine and 
dandy having all these won- 
derful modems, but unless 
you have the software to 
use them, they're no good 
to you. Many people use 
NComm, but it you're a CIX 
user, there's an infinitely 
better solution. 

Nicola is an off-line 
reader, which means that it 
automatically logs onto CIX 
for you, performs all your 
business, then logs ofl and lets you review the day's updates without having to 
pay phone time, Average log on time with Nicola with a download of say 1 00k 
on a 14,400 modem is under three minutes. The whgle point is, it cuts your 
phone bills to a tiny traction of their previous levels. 

When Nicola is running, it works very like CIX, in that 99% ol the CIX com- 
mands perform the same function within Nicola as they do in CIX, the 
difference being the data base upon which the commands are acting is in your 
computer, rather man on a main frame in Wales. 

The program also offers many features not supported by CIX, such as the 
option to filter out boring people, or highlight interesting ones. You can also 
print individual messages, or view every message number in a thread- 
Nicola is a dream to use and comes with a friendly Workbench 2.0-style 
interlace, it's also pfactical because it slashes your CIX charges and ■__ 
your phone bills. C&Sfcj 

Requires an error correcting modem and one meg of RAM, ^^^^ 



IMidoIb simulates the CIX command*, bu1 wllhoul wasting 
your phono bill- 



□ | Shoti Thread 



THREAD 



Threadi for nessage 1313 

-1313 

+4-1323 

+++1324 



V 






Nicola *l*o otters features nnl pf ovldftd by CIX, tUCfl « Ittk* thread trace option 



137 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 Add-OllS 



PRINTERS 

There's little point owning most business software 
without a way of outputting your results f and that 
means buying a printer. There are models to suit all 
pockets and all requirements. Rather than listing 
every printer in the world, we've simply summarised 
some of the best 



SWIFT 240C 




LXIOO 

£222.00 - EPSON UK - 0442 61 144 

The LX-100 is the ideal primer for the buyer on a budgel It uses a nine pin 
dot matrix mechanism which is quite noisy, but at 200 characters per second 
it's quite nippy for home use. It includes a 50 page sheet feeder to automati- 
cally leed paper into its mechanism, and it car\ handle tractor feed (sprocket) 
paper loo. j^p^^. 

A robust and stylishly designed printer which still compares jrjfWA 

favourably to its more highly specified siblings. ^^^j 



219 



STAR - 0494 471 111 

The LC100 is one of the cheapest 
colour act matrix printers, due to its 
nine pin head which doesn't give a very 
high resolution. Still, it's likely to be 
quite adequate lor home use, and is 
designed for economy, with ribbons 
costing a give away six pounds each 
compared to the £1 5 that a Citizen 
Swift 240 ribbon would cast. 

Il features very gg©d paper handling 
which means it's easy to use, and all in 
all the LCI 00 seems an ideal choice 
for beginners. A 15QCPS print speed 
isn't going to set the world on 





it's eas- 



OL400E 

£499 - OKI SYSTEMS - 0753 819819 

The OL4Q0E offers laser quality without the expense or the space. In actual 
tact it's an LED printer which means that whilst it gives the same resolution 
and results as a laser printer, it doesn't produce the same ozone depleting 
gases, it occupies about the same desk area as a monitor,, and is remarkably 
quiet in operation, 

A print speed of four pages a minute makes it delightfully nippy lor home 
use, although it's worth pointing oui that that speed only applies to _^ 
second and subsequent copies Of a page; trig lirst one is likely to C'JvEPi 
take considerably longer. ■' ^^^^ 

iooe" 



£359 - CITIZEN - 0753 5841 1 1 

The Swift is a 24-pin cdour 

printer which, despite using a 
dot matrix mechanism, is 
quieter than most. 

It uses a tour colour rib- 
bon to create a full spectrum 
of shades on paper, but 
when printing graphics, like 
all colour dot matrix printers, 
it's quite slow. As for text, it 
chugs along at 2 15C PS in 
draft mode, by no means 
exceptional given its price 
tag, 

Its paper handling is quite 
good, and because it comes with specific instructions lor Amiga owners, 
ii.- to set up than most. 

A reasonable option if you can't afford one of the colour bubble jets 

DESKJET 550C 

£539 - HEWLETT PACKARD - 0344 360000 

The 550C is the upgrade to Hewlett Packard's ever popular Deskjet 5C0C- It's a 
bubble jel capable of delivering vibrant 24-bil colour. In order to produce such 
results, you'll need a dedicated driver as the- Amiga Workbench drivers can't 
manage a fraction of the palette. Fortunately such drivers are available from a 

variety of commercial 
and public domain 
sources. 

In monochrome it 
offers a resolution of 
3QQDPI, but in colour 
this figure is signifi- 
cantly reduced. 

The 550C is a 
smashing printer, pro- 
ducing vibrant and 
more or less solid 
colour. The only real 
problem is the high 
cost of running it if 
you do a lot ot colour 
work (£27+ for 
ink car- 
tridges). 




fire, but it's tolerable. 



fr^jfr. 



BJC600 

£599 - CANON - 08 1 773 31 73 

Designed as a rival fer the Deskjet 550C, the BJC6C0 is the latest 
bubble jet to hit the market, and to be honest, it's very impressive, 
some of the most solid and convincing colour mixing yet seen. 

The only thing is, it suffers the 
same problem as the HP 550C in that 
it requires a dedicated driver to get 
l he best from it. In this case Canon 
themselves have taken the initiative 
and commissioned such a driver. 

The ink used by this printer has 
been specially formulated 10 dry 
quickly, and this reduces the problem 
of colour bleeri, and consequently 
increases the apparent resolution. 

Strangely enough, however, when 
it comes to transparency prinling the 
Canon is less impressive, and despite 
its quick drying ink, they still need to 
be handled with excessive care, 

Speaking of resolution, the BJCGOO 
manages 360DPI in monochrome and 
45-360DPI in 24-bit colour. 

It offers a print speed of 240CPS, 
and is certainly a very nice 
machine lor serious home 
use, 



colour 
offering 




13B 



Add-OnS AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 



RAM BOARDS 

Most Ram expansion boards available tor the Amiga 
1509/2600 are so simitar in features and design that 
there's little to choose between them: 16-hit RAM 
cards will work in the A3QW/A46W, but the RAM will 
run much slower than 32-bit RAM (motherboard Fast 
RAM), This is because these machines feature 32-bit 
architecture so that data can be moved around in 
chunks 32-bits in size. Obviously, by adding a i6-bit 
RAM card, you halve the rate at which data can be 
moved to and from them, causing bottle necks. 

A2058 

£N/A - COMMODORE - 0628 770088 

The t6-bit RAM card from Commodore offers 2Mb (expandable to 8Mb) of 
Fast RAM forttie A150CW2000. The card uses inexpensive 1Mbx1 DRAMS, 
although these are a bit fkJdly to install. Unfortunately the card only supports 
2Mb, 4Mb or BMb of RAM, so Bridgeboard owners will only be able to 
run 4Mb Ol RAM or the card. l^fcB^ 

Compatible with A 1 SO0/A2OOO/A3OOO/A3OOOT/A4OOO . %^^^ 



DIFFERENT TYPES OF RAM 

Chip RAM - Sometimes called graphic memory. The ansa of RAM acces- 
sible to the Amiga's custom chip set. This memory is used lor graphic and sound 
data, II such data is not held in clup RAM, ttw custom chips cannot access it, 
therelore it will need to be copied from Fast RAM lo be useable. Although most 
Amigas only come with one meg ol chip RAM. the AGA machines come with two 

megs as standard. 

Because Chip RAM is so valuable, you can run a Workbench program called 
FaSMemRrst which forces any subsequent programs thai you load, to load into 
fast RAM unless they specifically need Chip memory. 

DRAM - Dynamic RAM. These are the most common type of Amiga RAM 
chips, and are used on almost al A500 bind GOD expansions. They come in the 
farm of chips which are soldered onio your memory expansion. They come in indi- 
vidual sizes ranging between 32K arid 5t2K. although Ihey are rarely provided in 
this way. It's common to see four or even 1 6 DRAMs soldered onio an Amiga 
RAM upgrade board 

Fast RAM - General memory used by programs and date.. On the AGA 
machines the only limit to the amount of Fast RAM you can add is the size of your 
waliel and the size of the available SIMMs. Fasl RAM can only be accessed by 1he 

-t be transferred lo and Irom it far 

Tjcfcerthan the equivatenl data stored 
i Chip RAM. 

IMMs - Single Inline Memory 
lules, A special type of RAM that 
"ecome popular because Ol 
of use. Anything Irom one to 32 
_ abytes of RAM are stored on a 
nn circuit board half the height of a 
redil card, The card can then be 
lugged into any receptacle designed 
K It The largest capacity board gen 
ales so much heal ihat it even 
Kmes w«th is own mkso fan? 

& - Stands lor Zig Zag Inline 
tage. Another common type of 
1 they are essentially high 
dry DRAMS. However. Zips are 
r to gel hold of than SIMMs 
, (he RAM shortages earlier this 
ar ? and are likely to be cheaper. 



MICROBOTICS 8 -UP 

£N/A - INDI DIRECT - 0543 419999 

This card is similar lo the Commodore A205S, except it can support the 6Mb 
configuration the A2058 lacks. Il uses the same 1Mbx1 DRAMS lhal the 

A20SS takes. /^Tfe 

Compatible with A 1500/A2000/A3000/A3000T/A 4000 ^JjjjjZ 

1 .01 HMTtit - Icrtm 11 [>tr»durtnn __ . JE 




rlicriltotirs Fist Ran Hwkk^ Test, version 3 
' ltd Rule -. 

Int., All Rights Reserved 



bv Hilly Linaeveld and Ruk 5 1 men a 
(opvMht 9 1989, HuroSaticj, " 



. of the HnifjIlK operating Wtf**, . vour 

..toniticillv detecting ill (Winston f lug-iii 

th* ivitm, In erder to test pour nifiory boirdi, 

is, hmvtr, necessary to BESET t*e svsfw n "th a m thai 



Since version 1.2 
fkiigi is c<piTHt of autpnat 
cjrdi ("PlC'sV in the jvsten, 
it is, however, necessary t 
this auto-conf nurahon future is disabled. 

HftRHlHG: If you RESET, ill wtV in progress uill at lost! 
Therefore* click on CANCEL if you it ill need lo save things. 

fofor* proceeding Mke sure that J cow of vour Hitrilotics 
Ran Test diskette is in drive dfl:. Hhen w click on ttte.tESET ead- 
«t, th* pewm uljl retit the fknu, and return to wu i"i l"t e 
white with further instructions- Sa net be alamed: th* feuoa will 
seen to crash! Click on RESET er CiTMCEL nut... 



CRHCEL 



RESET! 



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£% 



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Shell 



PRORAM 3000 

$449.95 - PROGRESSIVE PERIPHERALS - O101 
303 238 5555 

This Zorro III RAM card (for Amiga 3000 and Amiga 4000) allows up to 
64Mb of 32-bit Fasl RAM lb be added to the Amiga to extend past the 
normal 1$Mb Fasl RAM limit of Ihese machines. Standard 1Mbx8/9 or 
4Mbxa/9 SIMMS can be used, but need to be added in groups ^mm^ 
of four (4Mb or 16Mb at a time). Qjjg£ 

A2632 

$549.95 - DKB SOFIWARE - Ol 01 313 960 8750 

This 32-bit RAM expansion card is designed for A1 500/2000 owners who have 
the Commodore A2630 accelerator. The A2630 can only be expanded to 4Mb 
of 32 -bit RAM, not enough for many RAM hungry Amiga programs, so DKB 
released this boarcl which plugs onto the back of the A2630 card to give space 
for up to 1 12Mb of 32-bit RAM to be fitted. The card comes with 4Mb of 32-bit 
RAM as standard, The card accepts standard 32-bit SIMM modules, and can 
mix different size modules for maximum flexibility. Due lo the 32-bit RAM being 
outside the standard A2000 memory map, once the board is fitted then true 
DMA hard disk controllers (A20.91. MicroboticS Hardframe, etc.} cannot be 
used reliably. f^^h 

Compatible with A 1500/A2QQQ. Requires A2&30 accelerator . <^LJ0P 




139 



Another great offer from a 
manufacturer you can trust 







* Price includes 
VAT and 
delivery 



High quality 

• Renowned and proven reliability 
• Styled plastic case 
• Low power consumption 
• Throughport facility for 
addition of further drives 
• Suits any Amiga 



•/ All Cumana 
products carry 
our 30 day money 
back guarantee 

^ All products carry 
our 1 2 month 
warranty 

^ All inclusive price 

Cumana reserve the right to increase the price 
at any time. This offer is subject to availability. 



NAME 



l 



ADDRESS 



\ POSTCODE 
l 



TELEPHONE NO.. 



i 



would like re order CAX354 Disk Drive(s) at £49.95 each 

Please debit my ACCESS/VISA cord (please delete)? 
I Number . Expiry date of card 



Signature . 

Cheques should be made payable to Cumona limited. 
Orders may be placed by telephone - 0483 5031 21, or by fax - 
V 0483 451371, or sent to - Cumana CAX 354 Offer, 



\ Pines Trading Israte, Broad Street, Guildford, Surrey GU3 3BH. 




./_ 



13 



inufacturers of 
lolity products 
since 1979 



Add 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



ACCELERATORS 

The Amiga 1500 and 2000 are slow machines. They 
use a 68000 processor running at 7 MHz, which is 
slower than a Sega Megadrive. Modern software 
really needs the speed that only an accelerator 
board can provide. Even the faster Amiga 3000 and 
4000 are sometimes too slow for certain tasks, and 
there are boards available to speed these up too. 

A2630 

£N/A - SILICA SYSTEMS - Ofil 300 1111 

Commodore eventually replaced the A2620 card in production with the A2630 
card, This card ru ns at 25M Hz using the 68030 processor, and is fitted wWi a 
25MHi 68882 maths co-processor as well. Like the A2620 it Tits into tie 66-pin 
CPU expansion socket 

Two versions of (he card are sold, with 2Mb o! RAM and 4Mb. Like the A2620 
the extra 2Mb has to be soldered on if you buy the more amnesic version. 

The 6SQ30 processor on this board is the full 60000 with Memory Management 
Unit (MMU), so GigaMem is abbe to run on this board without problems. 

If you want to expand the board once you have bought it there are two options, 
Firstly, there is the OKB 2532 RAM card, which gives up to 1 12Mb of 32-bit Fast 



A2620 



£299 - SILICA SYSTEMS - 081 3©9 1111 

The original price for this 68Q20 accelerator from Commodore was over £1 700 
when it was first launched, quite high for a product that made an Amiga 2000 
nun at less than trie speed qI an A 1200 tiled with Fast RAM, however the price 
for the card now (which also- includes 2Mb of 32-bit RAM) is far more realistic. 

The Amiga 1 500 and 2000 are slow machines. They use a 68000 processor 
running at 7MHi, which is slower than a Sega Megadrive. Modem software 
really needs the speed that only an accelerator board can provide. 

The 68020 card from Commodore comes with a 68020 processor running at 
14MHz, a 14MHz 56881 maths co-processor, and a 68851 Memory 
Management Unit (to run programs like GigaMem). It has an excellent build 
quality (as it was designed as a very expensive high-end card), and Erie card 
does not use the cut down cost-reduced version of the 68020 processor found 
in the A1 200. 

The card plugs straight into Ihe 86-pin CPU extension socket in the Amiga 
1 500/2600, Owners ol the original German A2O0O model will have to remove 
the 1 Mb RAM card from, this socket to fit the accelerator and their 68000 CPU, 

2Mb of 32-bit RAM is provided, and rt can be expanded to 4Mb using 16 
256x4 ZIP chips, but these have to be soldered into the board which isn't rec- 
ommended for (he inexperienced. Your dealer may be able to provide the card 
fitted with 4Mb instead of 2Mb if you ash niceiy, 

The card ir>creases your machine's overall speed SO that standard applica- 
tions run between three and six times faster than normal. 

When you have used an A2C0Q with the A2&20 card in, you won't want to 
use it again in normal 68000 mode, but just in case you do you can switch the 
card off by holding down the right mouse button on reset, which brings up a 
menu showing 68000 (standard Amiga) and 68020 (accelerated). You can use 
this to turn off the card when you want to use any old games that don't work with 
the accelerator running (except on the Germ an A20Q0 machines, where you 
have removed your 68000!). 
Compatible with Amiga 
A150O/A20O0. 




AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 Add-OHS 




GVP G-FORCE 25MHZ 030 

£499 - SILICA SYSTEMS - 081 309 1111 

This GVP accelerator lor the Amiga 1 500/2000 has sold well in recent years. 
Not only does it provide a 25MHz &8030 accelerator, but it also gives up to 
13Mb of 32-bit Fast RAM, and a built-in high quality SCSI interface too. 
The processor is the EC version of the 25MHz 68030 (so no Memory 
Management Unit is fitted), and it is lilted with a 25MHz 6S&B2 maths co-pro- 
cessor as standard. 1 Mb of 32-bit Fast RAM is supplied, but you really need 
at least an extra 1 Mb of 32-bit RAM to use the board sensibly. 

Tne SCSI is based on the GVP HC8 (now GVP 4009 reviewed ear- 
lier) and uses the same software . It is fully RDB compatible and 
supports DMA transfers lo its onboard memory. If you already have a 
SCSI controller in your Amiga, it is a good idea to transfer the drives to 
this new controller to maximise speed (if your olher controller is also 
RDB compatible then you will not need to reformat them), 

External SCSI is handled through a 25-way connector as standard, 
but to mount internal drives on the card requires a special mounting 
tL frame which is an additional cost. 
|^u The only 'real problem with this card is thai is doesn't use 

■^ normal SI M MIS. The card uses GV P's proprietary 1 Mb and 
^-^^^ 4Mb SIMMS which are more expensive and more diffi- 
^k cult to get hold of than normal 
^ SIMM S. Compatible with: 
Ik ^k A 15OO/A20O0 




Add-OflS AMIGA BUYER S GUIDE 94 






MICROBOTICS VXL-30 

£274*99 - INDI DIRECT - 0543 419999 

This is another accelerator thai requires you to remove your 5&000 chip and 
totally dismantle your Amiga, The board is sold in two pieces, the VXL-3Q 
accelerator and Ihe VXL-RAM32 RAM expansion. 

Despite what you may be told you need both pieces for the accelerator to 
work, without the 32-bit ram board the accelerator ruins so slowly that it's actu- 
ally a rJeoelerator, running at just under 0,9 limes the speed of a standard 
Amiga! 

Unfortunately, this is where problems begin. The combined board with 
RAM and accelerator is rather heavy, and because it's lopsided (it's con- 
nected to the board through the 68000 socket which is on the left of the board) 
after a while when it gets warm it tends to pop out ol the socket, always caus- 
ing a crash, invariably just before you are about to save something important. 

The board doesn't even seem terribly reliable when it is connected properly 
(even after using a glue gun on it to make sure it will never move again!). 
Strange crashes happen regularly (especially, but not only, when used in con- 
junction with GVP hard disk control lers). 

The accelerator comes as standard with the EC version of the 68030 chip, 
and the RAM card comes either in 2Mb or 8Mb versions (you can upgrade the 
2Mb to 8Mb, but you have to remove and discard the 2Mb chips first) - 

The speed increase from the combined accelerator/RAM beard is similar to 
other 25MHz 030 accelerators, around an 8 to 10 times speed increase over 
the standard machine, but with this particular board it is hard to say whether it 
was worth the bother. 

The only nice feature about the VXL-30 is the ability to map the 32-bit RAM 
into standard 24-bit address space. What does that mean? If you have a DMA 
controller (e.g. A590/A2Q91/Microbotics Hardlrame) you will no doubt have 

heard that most accelera- 
tors slow down your hard 
disk dramatically (One par- 
ticular company went out of 
business before releasing 
the 'patch' they claim fixed 
this particular problem - 
two years after announcing 
it would be available lo their 
users). The only other 
accelerators to do this are 
the Commodore ones. 

With the RAM mapped 
into 24-bit space the DMA 
controllers work perfectly 
happily, and I can confirm 
that the VXL-30 and the 
A59Q ate perfectly happy 
working together. 
Compatible with: 
A5QQ/A15WA2QQ0 - 
would have been much 
lower if not for 24- _ 
bit memory (^Mvfc 






m ^ 



i i 



: ■■ : '•'■ • ■ i ; \ ■ 
i ii M si \\ ll) 
t ■ i > i ■ ii 



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\ 


UK!' rMHiM>^ MIC 



MERCURY 040/3000 

$2599 - PROGRESSIVE PERIPHERALS - 0101 303 
238 5555 

This accelerator for Ihe Amiga 3000 and Amiga 3000 Tower (but no! A40G0/030) 
provides a 28MHz 68040 chip, upgradeable to 33MHz or 40MHz. It supports 
RAM bursting (very fast RAM access) and contains up to 32Mb of on-board Fast 
RAM, which as it is directly connected to the 68040 chip runs extremely fast. 

Like all 6&040 accelerators tilted to the Amiga 3000 it requires Kickstart 
2.04 in ROM (Many Amiga 3000s have ROMS which load Kickstart from hand 
disk. If it says 'Loading Kickstart 2.*..' then you have the early ROMS thai 
need upgrading. 

The ROM is available from Progressive Peripherals wilh the board, sl^^t* 
Compatible with A3OO0/A30OOT KJ^fjP 

GVP G-FORCE 40MHZ 030 

£899 - SIUCA SYSTEMS - 081 309 1111 

This faster version of the G-Force board comes with the 40MHz versions of the 
68030 (still without an MMU though) and 68882 maths co processor. It also 
comes with 4Mb of 32-bit RAM as standard and is expandable up to 1 6Mb totally. 

Otherwise it is exactly the same as. Ihe 25MHz model, and still uses^^^ 
those nasty GVP SIMMS. VF& 



Compatible with A1500/A2QOO. 




CSA DERRINGER 



option. 



£349-1799 - OMEGA PROJECTS - 0942 682203 

This accelerator for the A500/A1 500/A2000 is available in various configura- 
tions, from 25MHz 6&EC030 with no FPU to 50 MHz &B030 wilh 50MH* 68B&2 
FPU, A single SIMM socket allows up to 8Mb of Fast 32-bit RAM to be fitted to 
the board directly. It can also re-map Kickstart into 32-bit RAM, which speeds 
up the operating system tremendously. 

To fit this board requires the removal of the 68000 chip Irom the mother- 
board, which although not difficult is not as simple as fitting an accelerator 
board into the CPU extension socket. It also requires the complete dismantling 
of the Amiga 2000, rather than just taking off the lid as with fitting other cards. 

Apart from this, there is little to complain about, The build quality is 
excellent and the card works wonderfully. 
Compatible with: A500r500A2000. 



A3640 ACCELERATOR 

$1998 - COMMODORE - 0628 770088 

Available in the US, but not yet launched in the UK, Ihis accel- 
erator for the Amiga 4000/030 fits into the CPU card sockel 
(replacing the 68ECO30 processor card) upgrading it to a 
25Mhi 6B040 processor. This is identical to the processor card 
lifted to the 400Q/M0, so fitting this lo the 4000/030 gives you 
a genuine 400Q/040, the only diflerence being how much RAM 
is fitted to your machine and the little sticker on the front (and a 
replacement 4000/040 slicker is provided!) 

It will also work in the Amiga 3000 Tower (as long as 
Kickstart 2.04 ROMS are fitted, not the early ROMS that load 
Kickstart from hard drive), but not in an Amiga 3000 (there isn't 
enough room for the card lo fit in!). 

Speed increase is between three and four times the speed 
ol the original 6&030 system, and is more noticeable when 
upgrading the 4000/030 which doesn't have a maths co- pro- 
cessor as standard, 

Expect the list price in the UK to be much lower than ihis 
US dollar price would suggest, nearer £B00 would be 
a good estimate. 
Compatible with AWQQVA4QQ0-Q3Q. 




143 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 Add-QHS 



HARD DISK 
CONTROLLERS 

A hard disk will increase your productivity drasti- 
cally, and it's one of the test reasons for buying a 
'big box' Amiga (A 1500/2000/3000/4000). 

Described below are some popular bard disk con- 
trollers for the Amiga. Most are available either bare 
(add your own hard drive) or with various capacity 
hard drive mechanisms. Prices quoted are for bare 
cards without drives (except where stated). 

A2090/A2090A 

£N/A - COMMODORE - 0628 770088 

This was the finat Amiga 2000 hand disk controller. Although it hasn't been made 
for years they still ium up on tfie second hand market, sometimes labelled 'Hard 
Disk controller for A25Q0'. They are very primitive (using obsolete MFM ^^ 
hard disks), slow, and the A2090 model will not even auto-boot, Avoid 4f|Wfek 
this board ! Compatible with A 150Q/A20QO. ^JJBP 

A20©l 

£ 1 29 - COMMODORE - 0628 770088 



mwjH 



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w A2Q90.''2090A cards from Commodore, 



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and was a much better effort. 
Essentially the same excellent SCSI 
controller found in the A590 hard drive 
(but without the horribly slow 20 Mb 
hard drivel), It's one of the lew full 
DMA transfer controllers for the Amiga 
1 500/2000 and with a last hard drive 
can provide excellent results- it also 
introduced the RDB (Rigid Disk Block) 
standard that all good controller cards 
now follow. 

The card has space lor fitting a 3.5" 
hard drive, and a 25-way external SCSI 



■" connector for external devices (such as 
CD-ROMs, Tape Slreamers, or more hard drives). II also doubles as a Fast 
RAM expansion card, having space lor 512k, 1Mb or 2Mb of Fast RAM (using 
256x4 DRAMs, the same as the A590) 

The software supplied is the standard HDToolBox from Commodore, a sim- 
ple and powerful gadget-driven installation package, although the disk 
still assumes Kickslart 1 .3 and needs a little knowledge to use with 
Kickstart 204 or higher Compatible with A 1500/A2000. 



n 



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GVP A4008 SERIES II SCSI 

£139 - SIUCA SYSTEMS - 081 309 1111 

This new hoard from GvP 



isn't reaily new at all. It's the 
well known and well loved 
GVP HC8+ card with a slightly 
updated ROM and a new 
name. 

That itsell should not 
detract from the quality of the 
card. It is folly Rigid Disk 
Block compatible allowing 
drives to be interchanged 
with Commodore and other 
controllers, and more impor- 
tantly, standard software (like 
hard dish repair tools) will 
work correctly. 

The controller now sup- 
pods the full SCSI-2 
command set (allowing it to 
communicale more efficiently 
with SCSI-2 drives) , but does 
not support the double speed 
transfers that SCSI-2 FAST 
allows 

Although the card is 
essentially non-DMA (it uses 
the CPU for transfers), it uses 
DMA to an on- board RAM 
buffer, meaning the CPU is 
free from the majority of the 
drive workload, but the card 
will still work in 32-bit 
machines (unlike full DMA 
cards like the A2091). 

The card is packed with 
features. A 3.5" drive will 
mount on the card. Like other 
cards, in a 3000 or 40-00 this 
can obstruct the Video sloi or 
another Zorro Stat. 

Up to 8Mb of 1 S-bit Fast 
RAM can be added (1 Mb 
SIMMS as 2, 4, 6 or 8Mb) 
directly to the board. 
Connecting external devices 
is easy, a standard 25-way 
SCSI connector is provided 
(identical to A590/A2091/ 
A3000). 

The software supplied is 
very good. 

Compatible with A1500/ 
A20QO-A300O 
A3000TA4000 



<%pi 










Add-ons 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



turd Pnve P reparation, Part it lining md Fartnttiiis 



Interface address LUN 



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A4091 

£225 - COMMODORE - 0628 770088 

A4000 owners who w&re 
disappointed that their 
machines did not come fit- 
ted with a SCSI hard disk 
interface were delighted 
when Commodore 
launched the A4091 SCSI- 
2 FAST interface, which 
Supports running new 
SCSI-2 hard drives at full 
speed, which can be up to 
double the speed of the 
same drive running on an 
ordinary SCSI controller 
like the A2QS1. 
The card is a Zorro III 
card, meaning it will only work in Ihe Amiga 3OO0.<'3£lOOT74OOO computer*. 

A 3.5" hard drive can be fitted to ihe card, although this will cover up the 
video slot or a Zorro slol in the 3Q0Q and 4000. The drive is supplied with a 
long internal SCSI cable with a-nough connectors thai you should never need 
another internal SCSI cable however many drives you cram into your 
machine. 

It also comes with an active terminator. This is a small board that plugs 

into the end of the 



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SCSI chain to allow 
SCSI-2 FAST Irans- 
fersto work reliably. 

All the dip 
switches are acces- 
sible Irom the 
outside of the 
machine, and exter- 
nal drives are 
connected via a 
miniature 50-pin 
SCSI-2 connector 
on the back of the 



card. This is totally different to the 25-pin connector found on almost every 
other SCSI card, but is necessary for SCSI-2 to function correctly. No external 
SCSI cables are provided, which is a pity as Ihey are far more expensive than 
normal external SCSI cables. 

There are two problems with the A4091 . Firstly, if does not work with the 
Revision 9 or earlier Super-Buster chip. Bugs in this chip meant most Zorro III 
cards are either unreliable or don't work at all. All Amiga 4000/040 and 
4000/030 produced before June 1 993 have the older version of ihe chip, and 
Wang have to be called to upgrade earlier machines to the new chip (which is 
not available separately for you to upgrade yourself). 

A3OQO/3O0OT owners have more problems. All A300073000T machines 
have early Buster chips, and as almost all of these machines are now Jong out 
of warranty and no longer covered by maintenance agreements it is almost 
impossible to get your machine upgraded to run the card. 

The other problem is more fundamental. Commodore have stopped 
production of the card and it Is now rather hard to find, although some dealers 
will still have stock. The rights to trie card have been bought by US Amiga 
specialist DKB, who will be re-launching the card as a DKB product, probably 
by Ihe time you read this. 

Commodore A4091 cards also haive a few bugs in the ROM, There is now 
a newer version of the A4091 ROM available, phone your dealer for upgrade 
information. 

Compatible with A4OO0 (with Revision n or higher Super Buster I 
chip) 



£129 -GASTEIKER- 081 385 1151 

New in from Germany is the latest version of the Oktagon SCSI 

controller, While it was popular in Germany the Oktagon SCSI card never took 

off m the UK, mainly due to the success of G VP with their A2OO0 SCSI card- 

This is set to change now with the arrival of Revision 7 of the Okf agon 2003 
card. The card matches or beats the G VP feature for feature, it has full RDB sup- 
port, it supports SCSI-2 commands, it has a SCSI chip docked at 25MHz on 
board for very fast dala transfer, it supports up to 8Mb ol 1 6-bil Fast RAM. 

What makes the big difference between this card and the GVP one is the 
bundled software. As well as the hard disk install utility (which is very good) you 
get GigaMem, the virtual memory manager for the Amiga. This allows you to use 
part of your hard disk as (albeii quite slow) RAM. You can now run programs thai 
require huge amounls of RAM {ADPro, Real 3D r ProPage, to name a few) with- 
out having to buy large amounts of RAM. 

GigaMem requires an MMU {Memory Management Unil), which is a part of 
the 68030 chip. Unfortunately this was the pad that Motorola removed to make 
the Cheaper &6EC030 chip now used in the A400CV030, so 4000'103<U owners 
won't be able to take advantage ot GigaMem without a processor board upgrade- 
Having tested Iwo boards for two weeks, one in a 4000/040, another in an 
Amiga 3000, 1 have to say we have not had one problem. It's unheard of lor a 
card to be that reliable in an environment like mine. 
Compatible with A150X)20W/3000 3000T 4000. A4O00 030 arid 
A t50a / 2000 will not be able to use GigaMem without an accetera- (/Tr^^ 
tor board fitted with a 68030 40 with MMU. T^jp 




E » 



145 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 Add'OHS 



ADSCSI 2000/2080 

$1 10-$ 190 - ICD INCORPORATED - 01 Ol 
373 7700 



800 



Although ihis board has suffered from the success of the GVP card, this card 
is highly regarded, and for a while was the only SCSI card thai worked with 
68040 processors. This card has now been replaced in production with the 
new ICD Trilecta ■combined SCSI/ IDE/RAM interface card (which was unavail- 
able lor review at the time of writing), but the original AdSCSI 20E0 and 
AdSCSI 2000 (the same withoul SIMM sockets for RAM) are still available, 
often at excellent prices. 

Unlike the GVP and Oktagon cards, the AdSCSI 2080 does not have room 
on the card lor mounting a card. This is unfortunate, but not a problem if you 
have a spare drive bay to mount your hard disk in. External SCSI connection 
is a standard 25-way connector. tTftfifc 

Compatible with A 15WA2QQQ/A3GQWA4QQQ. %jjjjp 

HARDFRAME 2000 

$249 - MKROBOTICS - 0101 214 437 5330 

This card has been around for several years and is still available from 
the States. The card is one of the few true DMA hard disk controllers 
available, meaning the processor does not have to slow down while 
daia is being loaded from disk. 

The controller was one of the first to adopt the Commodore RDB 
format (indeed before Commodore released their own A2091 card), 
and the formatting software supplied is of high quality, and simple; lo 
use. 

The card is supplied with a metal frame allowing a hard drive to be 
attached to it, but it has no room for any Fast RAM expansion. Also no 
external SCSI connector is provided as standard, but a conneclor on 
the board can be wired to a standard 25-way external SCSI port wilh a 
simple Ribbon cable- 
Also, the full DMA transfer precludes its use in the A3000 and 
A4000, or any Amiga fitted with an accelerator board wilh 32-bit RAM 
(except the Commodore A2620/A2630, and the Micro botics VXL-30 
which both support DMA transfers). fc^3?fc 

Compatible with A 1500/A2000 (Only CBM/MicroboUcs *£££! 
Accelerators}. 



lsk mocK rre 



e par at ion Utility @ 1590 nicroBoticSj I nc 



Screen 1 
DISK SETUP 

z 



d 



.!Tl 7. 

mmimim 



Jfcp V.3B8738J nuttl 

Go to (.3nphm ff.c£; j riHr*| 



onnected, just click en that drive's tine in the list. 

f you have fiore than one drive connected! yet onlu one drive is shown 
he lift j click on the RESTART button and see if that finds the drive 
hot j, check cabling, drive terni tutors, unit junper settings, and pouer 
onnect ions on the drive K 

le suggest that you use the defaults (the Manufacturer's standard 
•ett ings for your drive as detemined by ftDPrep fron reading the RON 
if tit into the disk drive) 

SITING THE SETTINGS: 

If you decide to go to COMPLEX node, you will see a selection of 
>araneter boxes on the right hand side of the screen, fit start they u 
iontain the default settings, Just bring the wouse pointer to the text 



DATAFLYER 

$90 - EXPANSION SY5TEMS - Ol 01 510 656 
2890 

Oh deaH What a poor controller card this One is. You could describe it as 
cheap and cheerful, but I certainly wasn't happy when I was setting it up. 
It doesn't support RDB, it doesn't do DMA transfers, Ifs probably the 
sfowest controller since the A2090 and the software is so primitive and 
un-user friendly that I'm sure I could write better in a spare afternoon. 

Avoid this card if you can, only 90 for it if you really can't v^pj^ 
afford anything else. It's got a nice blue and white box, w^^ffl. 

though. .^^ p^. 




* 



UPRA WORDSYNC 

1 49 - SUPRA CORPORATION - OIOI SOO 727 8772 






Another card that's been around lor quile a while for the A2000, the Supra 
Wordsync is a non-DMA controller with basic features, it supports Rigid Disk 
Block standard (but not entirely correctly). It comes with a mounting frame to 
Gonnect a 3.5" hard drive, and a 25-way external SCSI connector. The soft- 
ware is simple 10 use, and quite powerful. 

There are better cards available for less now, but it's worth a look if 
the price is right. 
Compatible with A15WA2000. 



i n 




146 






. 



Add-ons 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



JARGON BOX 



450 

; 


<s> 




ICUl 

i 

l 

l 













CPS- Characters perseEDnd. Indicates how many characters a printer can print In a sttlfjlc 
secondl. Mast horns dol malris printers can muster between 140 and 250, but bubble jet 
printers are usually slower, but their quiet operation compensates. 

Co-Processor -k 
special chip which 
lakes cars of maths 
operations for the 
CPU, speed I ig up 
any operation thai 
uses maths. The 
increase in speed 
can he dramatic 
depending on Ihe 
complexity of the 
operation lobe per- 
formed, 

Co-processors come 

in two f n rm s the 68&81 and the &asa?. with Iti e latter being more powerf u I a nd mo re expen- 
si we. They also come in a variety ol clock speeds Irom 20MH? up to 50 or 6OMH2. II you use 
a co-pro that runs at a differeii speed tg your CPU, you'll need lu synchronise it using a 
crystal. Ray tracing and Iraclal programs can show the most sig nil leant speed increase it a 
co-pro is used. 

CPU ■ Central Processing Unil or processor. This is the 'engine' in your computer, and 
speeding this up will speed up every single thing your Amiga does. II can he speeded up by 
changing Ms cluck rale or stepping up lu the next chip in Ihe family'. Far greater im prove - 
rnents can be gained by performing the latter type ol upgrade rather than the lormer. The 
standard 68000 CPJ round in the A5D0 and A60Q runs at about 7M Hi. 

DMA Transfer- Some hard disk controllers use the processor lo do Ihe work in translemng 
data Irom the disk to memory. This slows down the machine when 111 es are being trans- 
ferred. DMA controllers contain special hardware lo handle the transler without slowing 
down Ihe processor, 

DPI- Dots Per Inch. When talking about printers it relers lo Ihe number of dots thai it can 
print in a single inch. The higher Ihe number, the belter, Whilst most primers use the same 
figure lor both vertical and ftoriiontal resolution, some alter speeilieations such as 
MOXtHDPf. 

In scanning lerms DPI describes the resolution lhal the scanner head can discern, and 
again the higher Ihe number Ihe belter Ihe result. 

FPU- Floating Point Unit. See Co-processor, 

i 

PC £ mutator - A piece ol hardware orsollware which when operational allows your Amiga to 
'pretend' la be a PC. how accurately it manages til is depends upon the emulator, but com- 
mon shortfalls are 
with the speed at 
which Ihe emulator 
runs, and the screen 
modes It can sup- 
port. 

Rigid Disk Block * 

mOB) A standard 
developed by 
Commodore to 
allow hard disks lor 
mailed on one 
manufacturers con- 
troller card to work 
on an omer con- 
troller. 

Trapdoor slot - The 
expansion slot 
located behind the 
plastic 'trapdoor' 
underneath Hie 
ASM, GDOand 
1200. 



SCSI- Small 

Computer Systems 
Interface. A stan- 
dard that allows 
hard disks from dif- 
ferent 

manufacturers lo 
work together and 
with any SCSI con- 
troller card. 




ADDRESS BOOK 



Canon (UK) Limited 

Canon House 

Manor Road 

Wallington 

Surrey, 

SM6 0AJ 

Tel. 081 773 3173 

Fax:: OB1 773 2156 

Citizen Europe Limited 
Citizen House 

1 1 Waterside Drive 
Langley Business Park 
Langley 

Berkshire. 
SL3 6EZ 
Tel: 0753 564111 
Fax: 0753 56244? 

Epson UK 
Campus 100 
Marylands Avenue 
Hemel Hempstead 
Herts, 
HP2 7E2 
Tel: 0442 &1144 
Fax: 0442 227227 

First Computer Centre 

Unil3 

Armley Park Court 

Stan n ingle y Road 

Leeds 

LS12 2AE 

Tel: 0532 312444 

Fax: 0532 31 9191 

Golden Image 
Golden Image House 
Fairways Business Park 
Lammas Road 
London. 
E10 7QT 

Tel; 081 355 1102 
Fax: 081 801 8365 

Hewlett Packard 
Cain Road 
Bracknell 

Berkshire. RG1 2 1 HN 
Tel; 0344 360000 
Fax: 0344 363344 

Indi Direct Mail 

1 Rmgway Industrial Estate 

Eastern Avenue 

Lichfield 

Staffs, WS1 3 7SF 

Tel: 0543 419999 

Fax: 0543 419079 

Oh 

550 Dundee Road 

Slough Trading Estate 

Slough 

Berkshire, SL1 4LE 

Tel: 0753 S 1981 9 

Fax: 0753 819871 



Omega Projects 

83 Railway Road 

Leigh 

Lancashire, 

WN7 4AD 

Tel: 0942 682203/4/5 

Fax: 0342 682203/4/5 after six prn 

Power Computing Limited 

Unite 

Railton Road 

Woburn Road Industrial Estate 

Kempslon 

Bedfordshire. 

MK42 7FN 

Tel: 0234 843388 

Fax: 0234 840234 

Silica Systems 

1-4 The Mews 

Hatherley Road 

Sidcup 

Kent, 

DAM 4DS 

Tel: 081 309 1 1 1 1 

Fax: 081 308 0608 

Siren Software 
Wilton House 
Bury Road 
fladcliffe 
Manchester, 
M26 9UR 
Tel: 061 724 7572 
Fax: 061 724 4893 

Software Demon Limited 
. 38-40 Queen's Chambers 
Queen's Street 
Penzance 
Cornwall. 
TR18 4HE 
Tel: 0736 331039 
Fax: 0736 331 4 S3 

Siar 

Star House 

Peregrine Business Park 

Gomm Ftoad 

High Wycombe 

Bucks, 

HP13 7DZ 

Tel: 0494 471 1 1 1 

Fax: 0494 473333 

Trilogic 

Unit 1 

253 New Wgrtts Road 

Bradford. 

BD12 0QP 

Tel: 0274 6911 15 

Fax: 0274 600150 



NOW ALSO 

AVAILABLE 
FROM 
HARGWARE 
Dept USP, 11 YORK PLACE. NR BRANDON HILL, HOTWELLS, BRISTOL BS1 5UT IN AUSTRALIA 



III 



Strictly PD wishing all our customers a VERY happy Christmas! 



ALL NEW UTILITIES 



! U200« 1 2 Ptay and read challenge .;z> 

D 11201*12 F»|F»cl*... »vk/IImi B you aver 

lea* lo know* about Ihe solar system 

I 11202* 1 2 Kids Games.. .. Geography, maths. 

scinumi aiord gai'ii-!; 
1 . 11303*12 Amiga Beginner... lull lulwrial 

I I U2W. 12 MATHS ADV... surda Tains 

f:n):>.!i-i:: li> solvn RErLEXTLST 
■I'.l:- 

1. UZ05+iz japan«Hi.,,worda day * vowb. 
I " U206* 1 2 CMM qua... simple qua game wdh 

ootourij grapNciil picftirHs Irani ages 
bard upwards Excellent name 
D U207*1 2 Gelignite Ionia (2]...i1 you want 

srmiti calourlii DPaiul luiMS. 
D UZW-l? Football Uagun Editor, ....:y1i.l,- 

your teams' league posilion as me 

n mulls CC*fterf. 

D UMfelf IBwM Emuintro wt J.--CGA IBM pC 
emulator wnllan to run oo any Amiga 
sriianewara ™r3idil 

D UHO. I? Account maslar-EKceteni Amos 
wTinei program. 

D UZ11+1S Dirtily Utlla... HI ghily 

recommended [srooMms, desigr'iBd Lo 
make CLI & Shell lasks virtually 
obsolete. 

D US13#12Grtnd*r...caniplirtifgriifilit: 

conversion package thai supports 
GIF. I PEG AlanST, (Naoerirome, 
rj«pas r . PCV. Targa. TIFF. Ham-E. 
and TIFF lormal pes 

n U213.12 kiscrlpt ifl.l... produce video lilies, 
inc. Iulty ixSEabli:: la*E nnrlines. 

U UZH+1? Repair-* Z...BewZap V3.3, a <nul* 
sector lileedilinp. syslam FlXDtok 
v1.2, recover as much a* po ai tJlt- 
from a delacbve disk. L>skS.alve 
trtjtt, tieaiHB a iib«i tile structure on 
a different device. Kirn as muchdaia 
salvaged Mom 1hs ohgrnal disk 

' I J21 5*12 Mandel Explorer 1,21 ..this is the 

bnjjl cdlntlinn nl FiattaJ GaneralirtO. 

soitwa/e on me Amiga 
: I U216*12 3d Helper. ..helps you start aulwlh 

Sdorapiiip? 
: I U21 7*13 Icon tool hit. ..every tool possible. 
: U21B>12 Space.. .tiH to you study apace, U 

me stars and wleeligl objecte- 
I U21 Si-12 Tram CAD v1.0.,..lrw bssl CAD 

piogrufn available lot Ihe Anrvga. 
OUaaiflJ B^t*mT«*lv.l1...cli(Kks:!rvi 

reports an ilia hearth dI you campuler 
G U222+12 Fll K22-..lnlrOMaker. IFF imports. 
D USHJ+iJ Con»pygrjpt»ic *OnH. , will work wflh 

DPaintV*.1, PHoPageS, 

PaoaSsiaam, Pace S«ne-, 

VUrwkBnncli v2.D4*,Abaul 3D larililTl 
Q UH++1S Utter* * bokkwplttla... Standard 

lormal letters 1o cul and parsle mio 

yuu* word processor, 
a U2SS+12 lyapwivi* V1 j...«riiwrlul 

program rnakmg pictures from a 

mathematical (orniula. 
G U226*12 Protection.. .tlriliiius cukacnon to 

protect your data 
U «J2ZTt 1 Z Club League...lo help you- keep 

track or stats and lads. 
G U22S*12 NCOMM V3.0...cmninuiiiiLBtifln5 

program 

I 111229*12 UMOP.PHv2.Z1 ...create smooth 

■r:::|ily; hntwnii-a !wi> n - iijj<!!^ 

I I UZJOt i? vyorkbench j . .in .| v 

1 1 11231*12 Dclamed v2.B...nnuslc*ddrtor. 
D U3J24-12 WB 3 Seno#rt*...<inhiin™ ypur 

Workbench disk bac*praunds wilh 

these cotour pes. 
n 11213*12 Llllle Trmetar vl.l...Zoam In on 

any counlry on a world map In obtain 

useful inlormBliDii. 
I U234*12 Printing disk.. .contains Banner, 

Graph Paper vl } and Disk Prini 

V3.59. 
I U215* 1 2 UOranrDl. A. ..provides a mechanism 

lor llnf rapid drawing rjl bilniup 

diagrams 
I . U2it*lZ «l Ravi •amp*M,..Garratl Watts' 

SOB Biate samples (IFF). 
C U2JI* 1 J EbsvCiIcwi.O... Spread sneei. 
I UZM*lZParHeneh...r:riasafl¥rarelo hookup 

two ftrnqas nr CDTVs 
D U13S*1J O t¥ »| p,r...|hr oHicial 

Commodore's devempers kit 
I ' U24d*12 EDPI«ytf...il looks, acts and sounds 

Ilk- ; -i CD player' 

L US4U1IM graphic*,,, several id modelkng 
end ray tracKIng progs. 

□ U243*12 Gmphk*.. .^luiiriinj graphir iiniugHK 

crealor, rrjEBE. rayshades sic 
D U2Ui.1.?AQA UDLS Z... 2.56 colour «on 

aoVwr, FLamsa2S£ and QtiickQraP 
¥1.1 

□ U244.12 Wlnbumckir VJfl.»...srunning AG* 

fractals. 6t!03ll'MD.-FPU versons inc 



D tliJritia 
G 1J24&.12 
D UJ47+13 

MMh.*!.' 

: 1.1 MS, I? 

G US 50*1 S 
GU2o1+i: 
I JUS52*1Z 

I JU253*1Z 
GUSS4+IZ 

nU25F>4l2 

.l.:!i,l/ 

I U2S7*12 
nUS5fl*12 

i Uzse^iz 

GUJ4&+11 
: U2EU12 

DUJ4J+1S 

: U263*12 
I JUZ64+12 
DUS4S+12 

I : U2H*12 
i: UZ67tlZ 

r: u2Ba,i2 

D U269-12 
D ■■- -'■!- 1:- 

ii. ■!. .:• 



□ IJ2JS.1? 

. . U?73*U 



1 1 J27G«12 



GenciakigliE V3.04... sfH'.-.K-.Ktsi 

database ror keeping 1radi of your 

tamily uee. 

Slack analyst... technical analysis 

■5ecun|i9S pnogram helping you 

to work out oas! share buys. 

Astronomy 

vt jO.,.calciiiales into 

aboul Ittasw moan, 

planets and 

rorKlnlLiliyiB 

Ming Shu Ciilna» 

Astrology, ..creates a 

hgrnricnpt? in saiiDrdK 

THanle de*l» vi .4, -95Ck ol ra* 

data - 6(10 games. 

TEK ATAK modules. ..ihumc 

ColrMrrlgl leans 

View Toota... contains coavet. Vew 

TifiH, lamily tree - easy to use 

.Ml. III. ".I- 

Mayor League. ..Keep up Id date wdh 

yrxir club's ^CrEunes. 

S-lpr View. ■ . graphic ■HuKlralinrt rjl the 

stars. 

Fareas1et...iacrirj piedictc* . 

AnEl-llkkar.. .slrai^s I ■■ Ki:r on Eli n-:; 

screens 

Football League Editor 

DrorwWAp V4.1...mukl map 1S2mb 

Ftsc» flil»r VI .4. . .horse raoig 

praokaor. 

OiskPnnl vl.ftl .. |v ill:-, ln::-:l:; 

Software Lister vl ,5. . .keeps beck 

of youn' soltware collection. 

OnMrw *1.4...5»igrlcul= iind h tlmrjls 
1 of games 

Scraen BlanKer ...Die ol Hit besll 
-i I'll nki:; I;n: TiviIk]EiI 7\yti 
Jibx. . .trill anl ask tar people trying 
ia ge< starred on the music side 
H5 CBck *2.*S-..;in oasy 1c. use HD 
menu and Workbench lour. Also 
enclosed is a prog lo creaie 
RNiqiaislurs ul all kinds Irani a thai 

adrlpL 

Pools Tools Z. . . Bebuggecl version 

of ll ii- |kxiIk 1ni+HLas1Kr. 

Football Forecasl,..d)9mp vwaioh 
Tail Enqlna V4.D... debugged 
version nl Ihe tJrir^ prj nnirtprras^-rnj! 
AOA uiUls., .Great colleclion tor al 
A 1200 ovrners. 
Golf Scor»r«K 1J4...nmvgpl1 

sconng program - analyse your 

game. 

SuparVllwar+1 3- . .contains dalailed 

instrucEans on how w create your 

own sideshow. 

F£74. ..1IDc:K:htt spettd up prog. 

Solo Semplei. , .live ctsiss wuh 

drums, synths. braels beala and 

mud.. ■.': 

Digllaldlxk 1...i:nmpu|*rlVu)in. 

Utility rrtamiB 

Aalro 22 v3.D.. .ncrt comas ivilh 

improvad graphics, greater accuracy 

and Hard drive suppon. 



I I G0M«1Z Nelgtt»ur*jZ distil, tmb, 2drlvea| 
tSicp Paul Hobrtson in irris superb 
Ramsay St caper 
I I GtM8*12A1Zt»Telr1s... classic. 
H GDCf9*12 Dr Mario.. .giaal fame. 
~ G*i rj+i S 1 8th Hole. .,(? *sts. 1 drivesl 
Ver^ addkHwe oolt oama. 



?5n 



ALL NEW GAMES 



L I GTO01 * 1 2 Heceseary rovgjhnata..,Arr>ericah 
tPolbal game wnnen-on Amos. 

G <5M2t12 Eah>13,,,lanOuigiey puzzle game 
rtlth SBk source code. Also enables 
unci Ihe chance, lo see how Erie 
game was written. 

U Qooj* 1 2 Wlbom, , .best platform game. 

I I GDM*12 Smurmunl... amusing shoot em up. 

G GWB* 1 2 FtghEIng warriois... nrcadis style 
kghi |r fl game- eiceHeat. 

I I G0W*12 Mugrjie via...ie<l advanlure 



WE NOW 

STOCK 

ASSASSINS 

GAMES 

1-120 



UTILITY 
WORKSHOPS 



These disks contain a number of 
programs an I He same Iheme, 

giving you outstanding value for 
money. The disks, are compatible 
with all Amiga s. with easy to follow, 
printable instructions 

nFSd+12 THE PRINT WORKSHOP 
G FXi*l2 THE HAPD DRIVE WORKSHOP 
GFIO+12 THE GRAPHIC WORKSHOP 
nFXJ*12 THE VIDEO TITLEFS WOHKSHOP 
G rXSt-lZ THE PACKEFI3 WORkSHOP 
1 1 FXfri-12 THE DISK REPAIR WORKSHOP 
G FK7+12 THE HATCHERS WORKSHOP 
UFX$+1i THE MRUS KILLERS WOflk SHOP 



ALL NEW DEMOS 



110411*12 World War II. ..lact book abouiyvvv.il 
G 002+12 plgllal Iranian Q1 the Warrlora 
...t'&ci&HE. irrtj) Tins absolule 
i ::iister at a music demo randans 9 
1racK!? spannng 21? minuEm wilh 
Z.fimeos of rave mtsic and SOu 
klobylBsol graphics, (jet il no a 1 
G Dua+12 Andromeda. ..nicked demo 
QD04+12 AtZdOeOwnoComplupllDii 
I I Das* 12 Jesus on E'a. . .(Z dleka) Trie besl 

■gvo nnnai: iltinio EC dare. 

I 1 D05+12 Undwarp. , , EnceHeM A6A demo - 
shaft oh your AIZDO 

G WT+12 Swlmtuit slldeshow (2 diUta) 

...Blanking rehkksin bikmis or parts 
ordhnli! 

GD04+12 HOH AGA D«rH0...arvjEher great 
demo lor showing aH your AlMO 

I DOS* 1 2 Desert dreams 42 dlaka). . .lielreas 
have put ngalhvr analher demo 
ciasac - highly lecammended. 

I'!D1D*12 2EV5 women.. . This photo realslic 
2S6 colour piclura sat contains 
rrMairtfilrf women in A2^ irvmal arid 
will load onto any 2* bifAE A 
application such as DPaini etc end 
can bo used on worhbai'icft 
backdrops |£ disks) 



FONTS 



Strictly PD presents an enuring new tool 
collection- ThH?rc- pre 2B disks Lvilhin Ihe sat 

in two forma: Adobe Type t or scalable. 
Adobe Poms work has been tested on 1tnal 



Page v30. PsgesHKr u3.0 Workbanch v2.g 
and v3.Q. Both types will work with toads of 
other Amiga packages that can take the 
•aril larmats. Please stale Adobe or 
scjilnn r wtnn ordnnnr] lonrs 



AN disks tit ctjmpdtitake with ill 
Amrgis unless Other wise stated 



ALL NEW BARGAIN 



MU UNPACKS 



STRICTLt TO BfflHG YOU A SELECTION OF 
XMAS BARGAIN PACKS, THE FOLLOWING 
RACKS ARE ONLY £10 (PLUS P+P) 

FOR 10 DISKS. 

H GLAMOUR PACK 1 

Ten disks slutfed lull of foxy chicks 
(A500 only) 

I GLAMOUR PACK 2 

Mare ol the same... 

(A5QQ, A50ui+ and A600 only) 

I GLAMOUR PACK 3 

I GLAMOUR PACK 4 

i I GLAMOUR PACK 5 

I I GLAMOUR PACK 6 

Stunning scanlily clad girls.. . 
This phale tvsalialk 256 plet jra s*t 
tQnlainsi beaultftil women in A256 
fonmat and will load onlo any 24-brt-AEA 
appHtalkni, such as DPalnt etc and can 
be used on Worktunch bsckdrops 
(AlKWonly) 

D VIDEO PACK 

This lour dish set contains loads ol 
great video iltling utilities, together 
with a 5D page manual to help you 
gel the tnosl out ol each programme 

BUSINESS PACK 

This 10 dish pack contains loads ol 
useful progs for your business 

GAMES PACK 

Ten disks full ol great games 

A1 200 PACK 

Great starter pack for ihe A1200. 



Blank disks... 

12 In twit bait- £7.5(1. BO... C22-BD 
100... £40,00, Mouse mats... E2.99eacti 




DEPT USR 11 YORK PUCE, 

NR BRANDON MILL, 
HOTWELLS, BRISTOL BS15UT 



* Cheques- P. O's payable to STRICTLY PD 

* Buy 30 or more disks lor just 75p each 

♦ Over 21 disks ONLY &Sp EACH 

♦ Only 99p per disk wnen you order 11 or moral 

• Orders o1 10 or less pa\ £l .25 per disk 

« Please add £1 lo all UK orders lot first class. 
postaget.Ordsfs from Europe please add 2&p per 
disk and Resi of Wend add 5dp per disk lor eidra 
postage; costs. 

♦ Catalogue disk available only £1 . Reviews of well 
Over 101X1 disks + Irjaida mflrfi 

♦The oamplete SDficily P.O. library is now available 
in Auslralia. To Ortler a catalogtje please send a 
chequo or posial order for $2.00 lo Hargware, 
29 Woralu S1. Woramanga. ACT 2611 , Auslialia. 



CD ROM 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Unless you've been living in another Galaxy for the last few years, you 
can't have failed to notice the infusion of excitement that CD ROM has 
brought to the computer world. Amiga owners are especially well 
placed to reap the benefits of CO ROM developments with not one, hut 
three CD devices for them to choose from t and a fourth one on its way. 

In case you're not actually familiar with the meaning of CD ROM, it 
stands for Compact Disk Read Only Memory, or to put it in English, CDs 
with massive amounts of computer data on them. 

CD ROM 



PIONEERING SPIRIT 

Commodore have been very much 
pioneer^, in the field of home CD 
ROM devices and their CDTV 
player was one of the first stand 
alone devices in the world. 
Despite receiving an initially warm 
reception from press and public 
alike, its high price made it some- 
thing of an elite bit of kit. and by 
the time the price fell to more rea- 
sonable levels, it was apparent 
thai, in general, there wasn't really 
much in terms of quality software 
available for it. 

The long overdue release of the 
A570 CD ROM for the ASOO stimu- 
lated the market briefly, but didn't 
really seem to do much to raise the 
general quality of the software. 

At the same lime as 
Commodore were fighting an uphill 
battle to convince the world of the 
benefits of their technology, Philips . 
inventors of the compact disk, were 
touting their system known as CD-i 
(Compact Disk Interactive). Despite 
considerably belter marketing, they 
encountered the same problems as 
Commodore, and their machine 
fared much I he same. It seemed 
that the world just didn't need CD 
ROM. 



TIME TO TRY AGAIN 

Then news of a 32- bit console 
started to emerge in late 92/early 

93. Of course, everyone was scep- 
tical but thanks to Ihe massive 
growth of CD ROM in the PC mar- 
ket, many people had eome to 
appreciate the potential benefits of 
the medium, and were perhaps a 
little more receptive to the idea- 
Commodore for their pari had 
learned ihe painful lessons of a 
disastrous CDTV marketing cam- 
paign. The CD32 is to be 
marketed purely as a games con- 
sole! 

When it was launched in 
August, the console was accom- 
panied by a hitherto 
unprecedented level of choreogra- 
phy which meant l hat the media 
were not only aware of it, but were 
lining up for opportunities to say 
nice things about it, Fortunately for 
Commodore, Sega had only just 
launched I heir own CD console, 
the Mega CD, a couple of months 
earlier amidst a multi-million 
pound advertising campaign which 
had educated people lo the poten- 
tial for CD games, Suddenly the 
CD32 arrived with specifications 
which buried Sega 's- offering. 





It 
waen'l 
enough 

that the CD 32 offered better 
graphics, a faster processor and 
more memory; it was to be 
upgradable, and incredibly one of 
the upgrades will even lei you play 
motion pictures, lo say nothing of 
some damned fast moving games? 



SRMEf 



LL 



Bui, of course, we've seen il 
before. It's not enough to have a 
great machine, you've got to 
have the software to go with it. 
This time Commodore have 
really done their homework, and 
long before the machine was 
actually unveiled, a select group 
of publishers were given con- 
soles so that they could begin 
writing games for it, As the 



countdown to the launch contin- 
ued, more and more developers 
were given machines thus ensur- 
ing a steady flow of new software 
titles in the first crucial months 
atter its release. Better yet, 
Commodore have clearly recog- 
nised Ihe importance of software 
titles which are unique to the 
machine, and have commis- 
sioned six titles that won't 
appear on any olher format. 

At (he lime of writing ihere are 
thirteen lilies available, bul by Ihe 
time you read this that figure will 
have doubled at the very least. By 
Christmas, you can expect to see 
70. yes 70 titles available, and 
guess what? They're only going to 
cost an average of £29 99 each. It 
looks like Commodore are onto a 
sure-fire winner! 



And the Future...? 



It seems that industry confidence in the fulure of the CD32 is running 
extremely high, and this has been helped by ihe fact that Commodore have 
showed some faith in the product by planning a range of related peripherals 
(o ensure trial as many people as possible can benefit from the technglogy. 

For starters, there's the FMV module which lets you play motion pic- 
lures. The module slots into the expansion socket at the rear of ihe CD32 
and will be available in ihe first week of December for an estimated price of 
£296. 

In the Spring of 1994 A1200 and A4uthu owners will have Ihe opportunity 
lo get in on the act lhanks to the CD ROM drives which will be available for 
iheir machines. No prices have yet been announced but it seems reason- 
able to assume a price poinl of £299 or less 

Third party suppliers have also been extremely quick off the mark and 
ihere are two major expansion boards due for imminent release. The first of 
these is apparently going to cost £99 and provides serial and parallel ports 
as well as a disk drive slot. The second expansion, which is being devel- 
oped by Index Systems is a box containing a disk drive, space for a maths 
co-pro and up to eight megs of RAM, a MID! interface, serial and parallel 
ports and a keyboard, and all for a target price of only £199. In other words 
you can turn your CD 32 into a super deluxe A 1200 1 

Commodore also have plans to release further peripherals, but they're 
keeping their cards close to their chest as usual. Watch this space for the 
latest news as it happens... 



149 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE "94 



CD ROM 




One of the great advantages that the CB32 has is the 
ability to add an FW module, $ut exactpr u,h*i dif- 
ference does that make and 




N'T GET CARRIED AWAY! 

CD32 offers a few signHlGanl advantages over other games mediums, but It's important fa 
keep things in perspective. Probably the single greatest advantage thai the system oilers 
is the ability lo contain hundreds ol megabytes el data on a CO that costs a couple at 
pounds to produce. This encourages more ton pie « or graphical games such as Afortfrey 
tstaa&inA the like, which would el he raise come on loads of disks. 

Another unique advantage which CD ftOM has is (he ability In plsv lull CD sound- 
tracks, and lo link them to games. Haw this doesn't mean thai every single sound ellect is 
played directly Irom CD -the heads that read the CD can 1 track and play quickly enough 
lor that, bu1 il does mean thai programs can have a CO audio track running in the back- 
ground, and i I sound effects don't need to be read (rem the disk quickly, they can 
accompany games. Adventure games are especially suitable. Also you shouldn't lurgel 
that in addition to the CD sound you still have the standard lour track Amiga voices. 

From a publisher's viewpoint, it's also very important that CU32 lilies can 'I be pirated 
thanks lo the sheer a mn unt or data that each disc holds. Even if you c ou I d pirate a game , 
without the CD audio much of the effect can be lost- 
Jus) because CD oilers some new abilities, we mustn't large! thai gameplav is lite 
mosl important lealu re ol all. Formal reason, if companies choose lo do straight conver- 
sions of some nl itieir existing titles, we should be grateful that CD3Z owners slill have 
the opportunity to play them, rattier (han sending Ihe companies lo Coventry lor not pro- 
ducing costly CD3Z special versions. Sere It'll be nice losee stuff written specilically lor 
Ihe machine, but let's not target lhal it's quality ?* well as Ihe glitzy superficial trappings 
lhat make a good game. 



150 




anywa 




FMV stands for lull motion video, 
and it's ihe latest buzzword in 
the computer industry. Basically 
it's the ability to store and replay 
motion picture quality animation on a 
computer. Ttie greatest problem that 
has beset designers of such a sys- 
tem is the rate at which individual 
graphic frames can be extracted from 
a storage device, In order for anima- 
tion to be convincing it 
needs to run at about 
25 frames per second. 
If you say 1 that an aver- 
age frame occupies 
between 50 and a hun- 
dred Kilobytes,, you 
can see that you'd 
need a drive capable 
of transferring data at 
the rate ol l250-25Q0k 
per second. Whilst fast 
hard drives may be 
capable of transferring 
data at this rale, CD 
ROM drives certainly 
are not. In fact, even 
the CD32 drive (which 
offers double speed 
loading) can only transfer data at a 
maximum rate of 300k per second, 
almost ten times slower than it needs 
to be! 



as JPEG, using ttie same basic com- 
pression routines, However, 
Subsequent frames use a system 
known as differential compression. 
Compression based on the difference 
between one frame and trie next in 
other words. Now one of the stipula- 
tions of the MPEG format is that date 
should be read from the storage 
device at 150k per second which 




So, the solution to the problem lies in 
compressing the data before it's read 
from the storage device. There has 
long been a special 
form of compression 
known as JPEG which 
is ideal for crunching 
static photographic 
images by 500% or 
more wilh a minimal 
decrease in quality. 
However, even that 
didn't offer high 
enough compression 
so with ihe advent of 
CD ROM a group ot 
experts got together 
to work out a new for- 
mat for animation 
known as MPEG 1 
[named after the peo- 
ple who formulated it, 
the Motion Piclures 
Experts Group). 

For the first frame 
of an animation, 
MPEG works in 
exactly the same way 



means that, running at 25 frames per 
second, each frame should occupy 
no more than 6k. Fortunately this is 
easily possible using this compres- 
sion method, however the only 
remaining problem is the speed at 
which images are decompressed- 
Even on a reasonably fast Amiga, 
JPEG images can often take ten 




CD ROM 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



seconds or more to decompress. 
The simple solution is to build a ded- 
icated chip whose sole purpose is 
Ihe -decompression of MPEG files, 
and which can do so in 1 /25th of a 
second or less, and thai is essen- 
tially what Commodore's FMV 
module does. 



UNIVERSAL 
STANDARD 

However that's not the end of the 
story, oh no! The thing about MPEG 
is lhat it's a universal standard which 
is not specific to any computer, 
which means lhat MPEG movies can 
be replayed on any computer lhat 
has the appropriate hardware. In facl 
MPEG hardware displays graphic 
images directly,, without using any of 
the computer's display chips. In 
doing so it uses its own internal reso- 
lution and colour palette which is in 
fact at least as good as normal 
video. This means lhat if you buy a 
CD32 FMV module, you'll be able to 
replay FMV footage in the video 
equivalent of 24-bit colour, although 
ihe apparent resolution is nol partic- 
ularly high; equivalent to that of a 
normal TV. 



sue 



LTIMATE 



The way that the FMV image is 
incorporated into the display means 
that it's essentially treated as a gen- 
locked video source which, in torn, 
means that the Amiga can overlay its 
own high resolution graphics without 
interfering with the FMV imago. 
Imagine a video of a walk through a 
spooky graveyard is playing on the 
screen complete with an ^n& CD 
quality stereo soundtrack. At ihe 
same time Ihe CD32 is overlaying 
that image with super detailed 256 
colour computer graphics as you 
control a character walking across 
the screen, Sounds good eh? Makes 
my mouth water just to think Of it! 





We've talked enough about 
the theory of CD32, let's take 
a look at some of the stuff 
that's available tor It,. 




DEFENDER OF THE CROWN 2 

£20.99 - SACHS ENTERTAINMENT/COM- 
MODORE - 062a 770088 

What better program to show 
off the CD32 than a remake of 
ihe game thai sold so many 
Amigas when it first appeared 
in the Eighties? 

The object of the game is 
lo raise sufficient funds to res- 
cue Richard ihe Uonheart 
who has been captured 
whilst on crusade, and is 
being held hostage. You 
raise money by levying taxes 
upon the territories you own and you can 
increase the number of territories by going on conquests. 

The game is played on a map of England which is divided into territories, 
Before you start you are allowed to pick one of lour noblemen as your character 
■and each of these has different attributes. Having chosen a character, you will be 
assigned one of the territories and a caslle will be placed there. The other three 
noWes who are computer controlled, are also given a territory. From then on, the 
game pretty much consists of capturing territories adjacent to your own, If ihe terri- 
tories are occupied you'll have to fight for Ihem, and if they're empty you'll simply 
be given them, Fighting merely consists of choosing (he appropriate aggression 
level for your attack; there's no actual action invofved- 

Al any time you may call a tournament where you will joust against one of the 
olher nobles. You can decide the stakes, choosing between money, fame or territo- 
ries, The only time I've ever managed to beat the opponent was when I killed his 
hprse! Incidentally, although CD music accompanies the toumy, I preferred Ihe origi- 
nal tune for the records! You can also go raiding, attempting to steal money (torn the 
castie of one of your rivals. In order to succeed you'll need to win a sword fighl 
against a couple of caste guards, This involves rhythmically pressing the fire button 
and moving right every so often. Challenging stuff indeed! You may also be offered 
ihe chance to rescue s Saxon maiden, and if you accept, the same sword fighting 
sequence is used. If you're victorious ihe maiden marries you and you're rewarded 
with a couple of beautiful animated sequences that end up in the bedroom, 'null said. 

If you choose to attack a territory containing a caste, you'll need to use a cata- 
pult to break down the walls. This consists of pressing the joypad up or down by a 
specific number of dicks to set ihe elevation of the shot, Once you've learnt the 
number of dicks, you can simply repeat it each time you attack a castle. Every 
action you take in the game Is accompanied by a CD commentary by a man with 
a superbly modulated voice. The graphics have been significantly enhanced, 
and there are a couple ol new animations when riding to a castle or fighting, 



Defender is a magnificent showpiece of a game in terms of audio and 
graphic quality, but these do nothing to mask the essential simplicity _ 
and blandness of a title_whose gameplay hasn't altered apprecsa- ^l^ftfc 
bly in seven years. ^^jjjp 





MORPH 

£29.99 - MILLENNIUM 
- 0223 844894 

With Millennium's Diggers already 
included with (he CD32, it's a little 
surprising to see lhat one of iheir first 
independent releases is also a strat- 
egy game. 

In response to Commodore's 
request for CD32 titles. Millennium 
have quickly converted Ihe disk ver- 
sion of the game to run from CD. 
There are no perceptible changes to 
Ihe gameplay, but as Ihe game plays 
perfectly well, lhat's not a problem. 

You play Morph, an unfortunate 
kid whose mad scientist uncle acci- 
dentally zaps your molecules 
changing you from a normal boy, into 
an unstable shape-shifting blob. You 
can exist in four forms: a gas cloud 
which floats upwards passing through 
obstacles and is highly inflammable; 
a water drop which falls through grills 
and can put fires out; a rubber ball 
which can bounce but will burst on 
spikes and a ball bearing that can 
break walls and which is impervious 
to tire and spikes, but will sink in 
water, 

The game is divided into levels, 
each of which is played in one of four 
zones: the sewers, the lab, the gar- 
den or the factory. Although each 
zone has a different character, they 
all consist of solving problems to col- 
lect a cog in the damaged machine 
that transformed you, before exiting 
to the next level. Not only do you 
have a limiled time to achieve this, 
you also only have a Nnite number of 
transformations to help you. 

CONCLUSION 

Although Morph does nothing to fur- 
ther CD entertain men!, it's a colourful 
and playable title, which starts fairly 
difficult and ranges between enjoy- 
able and infuriating. Not one to play 
for many hours at a time, but the sort 
of game you're going to keep coming 
back to. A save option wouid have 
helped as it lakes so long 
to play. 



151 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



CD ROM 




DIGGERS 



ZOOL (AGA) 

£29,99 - GREMLIN - 074a 753423 

The CD version of Zool is just the thing to shut up those console addicts 
who Keep on about &ubsy, Mario, Sonic or other cutesy characters. 

There's nothing cute about the CD version of this best selling Amiga plat- 
form game It's slick, it's colourful, it's fasl, but cute definitely not! in fact I 
would even go so far as lo say that what was a rather bouncy game has 
suddenly taken on a very sinister air about it, 

A number of things combine to create this impression: first up is a superb 
30 second ray traced intro showing Zool arriving at his barren home planet, 
before turning to kick the screen gut. As you commence play a stomping CD 
audio track blares out. and over the top is a very unpleasant cyber voice 
which says in a burbly manner Welcome to the Nth Dimension". As you 
play, each character has its own sound effect, and these too are a tad dis- 

U r The gameplay has been significantly enhanced for CD and the biggest 
change is in the controls which are now much more responsive, much fasler 
I and easier to use. Climbing walls is no longer a problem, and Zool can jump 
further than before. The control changes combine to give the game a lot 
more pace, which is a double edge sword because whilst on the one hand 
you're moving around far easier, on the other this encourages you to leap 
before you look and take more chances which invariably costs you a lite. 

— The monsters require a bit 
I more precision to kill as far as 
jumping on them goes, and this 
takes a while lo get used to, 

j CONCLUSION 

' Graphically this is simply the AGA 
version with awesome intros and 
outros. The audio really makes this 
game, and I wouldn't have 
believed that the soundtrack could 
I make il so dark, The game is 
I moody to play, but great The 
enhanced controls a*e ^^^ 
especially appreciated. 87% 



4^ * 






At CU Amiga we've always 
stressed thai the reviews are 
simply our opinions, and no 
game has evokes such 
strongly opposing opinions as 
Diggers. 

The game is supplied free 
with the CD32 along' with 
Oscar It's a strategy game and 
something of a cross between 

Lemmings Populous and Pawermonger. The objective of the game is to 
accumulate a certain amount of money or wipe out your opponent. It s 
played across a variety of terrains and in order to achieve your object you 
must mine precious minerals from beneath the surface ol the planet. 

To help you there are a variety of tools at your disposal to speed up 
the process of digging. However these tools need to be purchased, and in 
the early levels you barely have time to save for them before your oppo- 
nent has beaten you, 

CONCLUSION 

The lack of a proper manual makes the game very 
slow to get into, and even with one I suspect it 
would take a good couple of hours to get much of a 
feel for it. Played by control pad the game is painful, 
but using a mouse helps things along tremendously. 
I enjoyed playing it at first but the repetitive nature 
of the tasks soon became a real pain. The CD audio 
tracks that accompany your efforts are fairly atmo- 
spheric to begin with, but after a while they begin to 
grate and I just wish there had been some 
way lo turn them off, Disappointing, 

OVERKILL/LUNAR C 

£29.99 - MINDSCAPE - 0444 246333 

With 660 Megabytes of space on a CD, il was inevitable that sooner or later compi- 
lalions would start to appear, we just didn't expect it to happen quite so soon. And 
one of these games hasnt even been released before! Both are shoot 'em ups 
modelled after classic games in Ihe genre, and both are pretty damned good, too. 
Overkill is based very closely on the wireframe arcade bit Defender. It features 
impressive scrolling backgrounds thai have more levels ol parallax than I can 
count although (here's very little background scenery. 

When (he game starts you're dropped from your mofhership, an impressive half 
screen metallic monster. Unfortunately, your ship is a squirty little halt inch blob, 

and I would have thought that it could be a 
bit more detailed but once you start play- 
ing it doesn't make one jot of difference. 

The game basically involves flying left 
and right, using your radar to locate and 
shoot the aliens and rescuing any civilians 
who may be stranded on the surface of the 
planet. Unlike Ihe original game, you can 
also goi weapon power-ups to make It a 
■ bit easier. 





152 




CD ROM 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



JAMES POND 2 



■MIA *Lf I**** 

■«ffiJ« 



mUfT ft-*" 1 " 










£29.99 

MILLENNIUM 
0223 844894 

Vel another conversion of an A1 200 
game, l his time everyone's favourite 
fishy superhero gets the Ireatment. 

James Pond is one of ihe success 
stories for Millennium as the charac- 
ter not only made it onto the 
consoles, but is also used on Sky's 
Game-sworld program. 
The game is preceded by a thirty second cartoon qualily animation, and if 
you choose to watch the advert for James Pond 3 you'll see several minutes of 
superb full screen animation complete with Danger Mouse like narration. 

The game itself is a lively platform romp around the arctic, and although the 
backgrounds have been tweaked to use the: AGA chip set, the actual gamelay 
remains the same as for all other versions, Your on-screen efforts are accom- 
panied by one of seven jolly CD soundtrack*. In fact, you can even listen to 
them on an ordinary CD player so long as you skip ire first track. 

CONCLUSION 

The original game 
was enjoyable 
enough and the con- 
version to £D has 
only improved ii. The 
controls take a little 
while to adjust to, but 
apart from that I 
can't fault 
the game. 





h**t ***£**..*....».. ..*,., 



Il4llttl4llt*4lll 




The other half of the duo is Lunar C, the never- 
before-seem element of the package, and a more 
blatant Project X clone would be hard to imagine; 
not that Project X was particularly original in its own 
right, 

The game is a horizontally scrolling shoot em up 
that comes complete with power ups and a variety 
of alien types. Learning the way that each alien 
moves is the key to success, especially as they 
attack from behind! from the word go. In fact, 
although the game is easy and enjoyable to play, 
some of the alien formations are rather silly and don't seem to give you much of a 
chance. However one thing that I did like was the way that your lives are repre- 
sented as a power bar, rather than individual markers. This means that you can 
get hit, say. nine times before exploclng and dying, rather than exploding nine 
limes then dying, This gives the game more flow and gives you a better chance of 
getting into the swing of things. 

CONCLUSION 

As individual disk games these would be perfectly adequate at a budget 
price point, and as a CD double they represent, if not outstanding, then 
certainly fair value. This is a good way to give your collection a 
quick boost, and I really can't imagine any complaints from. 
shoot 'em fans, 



PINDALL FANTASIES 

£33.99 - 2 1ST CENTURY ENTERTAINMENT 
-0235 851333 

Pinball Dresnte was the sur- 
prise hit of 1 991 , and the 

follow-up Pinbali Fantasies was 

even more popular, but how 

well has ft matte the transitions 

to a CD product? 

Well, unsurprisingly, it's 

even better on CD than it is on 

disk. The- four tables are 

exactly the same as their 

A1200 counterparts complete 

with AGA colour and music. 

However the game has 

received the same ireaiment 

as ZooL with both the play and 

the sound being tweaked, In 

terms Of game-play, the action 

of the ball has been slightly 

altered to make it respond 

even more smoothly and even 

more accurately. The ball 

seems to be capable of prckmg 

up frightening speed at times, 

transforming rl into a silver blur. 

Overall though, the angia of the 

tables is perhaps not quite as 

sleep because the ball seems 

to roll a touch slower, 

The table layouts are exactly the same as far as I can see, but one 

miner disadvantage is that the game now explains the score structure 

using on-line helps screens which are accessible from the main, option 

screen. This means that you can't check whal lo do in the middle of a 

game, and considering the complexity of the scoring, this is a problem if 

you're piaying seriousiy. 

The in-game music, whilst musically sound, doesn't soem at all 

improved over 1he disk version, and after a while it begins 1c- grate and I 

turn r| off, 

The option screen is also accompanied by music, but this time it's a full 

CD soundtrack, and rather 
a good one at that. 

II I have one major 
gripe about this otherwise 
impeccable game, it's the 
bloody stupid choice of 
controls. I mean you need 
a left and right button to 
control Ihe flippers, 
wouldn't i! seem logical lo 
use the top left and right 
burtons on the controller? i 
would have thought so, but 
instead 21 st Century 
decided to use down on 
tho control pad and the 
blue button. Because the 
burtons feel different to 
each other, I constantly 
make mistakes, and it just 
doesn't feel completely 
right. : ' : 








ignonngthe slightly irritat 
mg controls, Pinttgll 
Fantasies is definitely 
must-have CD32 lille 
Again it doesn't si retch the 
machine at all, but it 
is an eminently 
playable game! 



: a 




153 



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Plants For All Seasons 

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fseuitf-l hW £i HE Chlprca 
C<JB»1.PTO Xlr- Jnyi»i 
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Fi tin M*Ber S-:n"n 
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INTEQnATED 

ileum onictim^iiii) 
Tjtf W.cAi Plmit- *K ■ 
The Wcni B.ilJk *'K ■ 
MULTIMEDIA 

AiVi^ViMM 

PFOGHAMMING 

■ i| ,4 hur IrJcipirtcf 



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SOUND 

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Postage pwr ordtn UK £2. EC £6, Eufops £fi, Wi?«« £1B 
Piymenli Aiccess. Visa. London Siarlina Chwues i PO's I 



Phone: 0983 551 496 

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reh Kwnttl. Coma ^trrnhguaa. C(KVff LariB, Chale Grwi. Wa Of WlghtTPQaa SLA, U.rt~| 



ADVERTISERS INDEX 



Ark ...Page 154 

Blue Ribbon .»..- -^e 171 

Bruce Smith Books ■ ^ 0° 

Bus Slop PD ~.. ......Page 154 

CologoE • -» l^H 

Coombe Valley Software...... ............Page JB 

Core Design.... • ■ '/ agB Ai 

Epic Pd — - p ?9 e ] JJ 

Five Star PD. - ■ ■ ■■ *** ^ 

Grapevine Group « .............Page J» 

GreHin Graphics.......... .....Pages 56 & 57 

Ground Zero - pa Jf *? 

Harwoods ...«, -...» Pages 49, 51 

Hi soft ...». ^ 9o 

Hobbyte ■ - Pa 9 es 1 24 & . ] ™ 

I.C.E.. :..». ...PageLB.C 

Krisalis .«.— » .........Poge 16 

Ladbroke Computers..,. .«.- - IT 09 *, i! 

Marcam..... .»». »■ I'Sfl Si 

Meridian..... " B " P ° 9 n i r \ ?1 

Mindscape -...». Page* O.B.C, * Jj 

New Dimensions - - » p S8v;i7 

Ckean Sohware ..Pages 28 & 34 

Omega Projects ■ ■■ pa 9e ; J" 

Rombo ■ » —— Pq S cL ^ C ; 

Seosoft ..- ..........Page 166 

Software Demon Poges 41 f 68 & 69 

Special Reserve... •-*> ^ "» 7 87 

Siiko Systems.......... Pages 79, 103 &109 

Spectra Video ^ -» Q ^1£ 

Strictly PD — «• Pa 9 e 148 

W.T.S. Electronics Pages 132 & 133 




mm » 



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MUSIC 

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ROM 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



INSIGHT 

TECHNOLOGY 

£33.99 - OPTONICA/COMMODORE - 0628 77008B 






OPEDIA 2 



£134,99 -XIPHIAS/ 
COMMODORE - 0628 
770088 

Although the COTv was touted as 
a multi-media marvel, it's been left 
to CD32 titles lo show jusLwhat 
can be achieved, 

G rollers is an el* 
ence source whi 
browsing throug 
specific informalite 3 
Hutchinson's EnjSI 
CDTV, Grolie.' 
nrisy to use makin 
than books for af u * 

It can Ipe " 



ways. bu» 



:r usfflB 
\ Unl1 ^l 

Pnbetter 

Search, 
number of 
Ifor 
pi the fact finder. 
i Fact Finder you'll 
■ a screen showing 
ne alphabet. Simr. 

SI 



be presenM 
thele - 
spell the si 
in and seta 
lew second 
headings i 
word or w 
Choose one™fflMpove the cur- 
sor over it Whd elf* the button. 
*ll there's no subject listing, 
click the Ylowi Search Culton and 
alter a similar pause every single 
occurrence of the specified word 
will be listed, showing ihe article in 
which it occurs, and Ihe number of 
occurrences. 

Once you've selec^d an arti- 
cle, you can simply | ugh 
using the up and dH^^Kps or 
the screen to a^^fl he k> i ! 
through the le."*' 
very involved on 
you'll also be q^H ^on to 



I 



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wiion Allhriiurjlh many icianbific 
iejfjlBfi«a *r« ifiv&\Ttid m ttie rapid 
HMH in AviAHofi Ic-crmolog;^ rvanc --a a-x 

EiiirFafil nhlhr BiKCCriirl ilsell r I "iiS *r lie"? 



ii ii im 





v; truer 


H|||J| 


jjjH 


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view an oulline, which simply lists , 
sub-headings within the specified 
subject, any of which can be 
.; re complete 

ects are also 
1 photographs, and 



icti pictures, 
i return to 

jnre m 

s help but- 
i 
how to 

.:sing, you 
opic Tree 
jju a choice 
dings. Choos«ng one will 
mn display a substantial list of 
Haled subjects and further sub- 
jects are nested below these 
prompting yo'u to choose ever 
more specific subject^natter until 
you get to an article which is 
exacjly whal you're interesled In. 

CONCLUSION 

Grolie rs is very impressive 
demonstration ot (he multi- media 
concept but I would have liked to 
haVe seen considerably more pic- 
* tures, It can be used for reference, 
education or entertainment. The 
entries are well wnlten and inter- 
esting, although there is a strong 
American bias to everything, 
especially social and political sci- 
ences It's very easy to use. and 
although it is expensive, it's less 
than a fifteenth of the cost of a 
decent set of Encyclopedias, and 
a heck of a lot less bulky! 



TttPIES 
HELPTOUR 


.■■^JJmlkr- 

BMWSE . INDE* 


ERECTS 



In a computer dominated world, 
Ihere's no reason why education 
needs to be two dimensional or bor- 
ing. This fascinating title combines 
video, audio and text information lo 
provide an exciting and informative 
technology reference. 

Insight Technology is a guide to 
the way things work, and it explains 
many of Ihe things we see around us, 
from guns and water-wheels to robots 
and helicopters. 

The choice of subjects is pre- 
sented as an alphabetical list through 
which you can quickly scroll, highlight- 
ing the headings as you go. When 
you reach a title you like the sound of. 
press the button and the relevant 
entry will be displayed after a few 
moments. 

Each entry consists ot text, an 
annotated diagram and picture 
sequence. Vou can scroll through the 
text: at your own pace, or at any stage 
clicking the mini diagram will produce 
a full screen version oHhe same pic- 




*LiJ 


■"rtiapme.it of the 
e iesTro pic wdpg line His 

m llttfs&lMrtoliii 
i lectin r»iflsje vol Jtlon 
~M inttoD wrtm n oi 


HBI 


the First system for ttw 
mine ?fl*l£ an, 

qsmtinvHiUtlta 
l97S,«acftn*W Mitt 

|! 1 H-TTttl * [ 


£ 




# 



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fin ttiiT12ft ftpril 138 1 the 
wry In st space stiurtte 

w4siat!".ched heqtnnlnj 


CP 


a new era in space 
| Banwrt technology. th« 

the * orld's first jtusable 
snasi weftieie. Stout we 


■831 


same situs bQC9 




n T i,»j 





lure, with perhaps some very primitive 
animation such as colour cycling. 
Whilst you 're looking at the diagram, 
a narrator gives a ten second 
overview of the topic. The sound qual- 
ity is not amazing, but it's more than 
adequate, and the narrator's diction is 
so clear that there are no problems 
understanding what's being said. 

If you click on the other mini-pic- 
ture, the seme narration is given but 
this time it's accompanied by a series 
of digitised pictures showing various 
aspects of the subject, These pictures 
are of absolutely superb quality, and 
greatly enhance the presentation. 

Approximately seven percent of 
the subjects are also accompanied by 
video footage, complete with sound- 
Once the picture sequence has been 
displayed, the video footage begins, 
lasting for perhaps 20-30 seconds. 
This takes the form of eighth screen 
real-time animations. These some- 
times add a little to the narration and 
texl, the choice of image to video, as 
well as the subjects which contain 
animation is very obscure, and I sus- 
pect that Qptonica merely included 
what was to hand, rather than com- 
missioning anything really interesting. 
For example, on the section about 
submarines, you see some footage 
walking through what might be the 
engine room or bndge of a subma- 
rine. Either way, all you see is lots of 
dials, and metal furniture. I would 
have thought that some exterior ani- 
mations would have belter illustrated 
the subject matter. 

CONCLUSION 

Insight Technology has a far 
narrower scope than G rollers, but 
the illustrative material and narra- 
tion means that you're more likely 
to view every entry. It's stimulating 
for adults and children alike, and I 
think that this would be very much 
at home in a school library or sci- 
ence department. If you're 
interested in Ihe way things work, 
and you don't want to wait till the 
next TV documentary to find out, 
then get this comprehensive 
and enjoyable CD. (sV^fr 



155 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



CD ROM 





THE TALE OF PETER RABBIT 



Peter Babbit 



S. 



i And roshad into 
the tool-^hed, and 
jumped into a can. 
4 [t would have 
been a beautiful 
thing to hide in if 
it had not had so 
much water in it. 



£24.99 - ALMATHERA • 081 687 0040 

Beatrix Potter stories have been delighting children for the best part of a cen- 
tury. Now your children can discover new levels of enjoyment that has only 
become possible thanks to CD ROM. i ltallc+hj5 . 

This enchanting tiUe is suited for children of four years and older, it tells the 
tale of Peter a young rabbit, who runs into trouble when he disobeys his mother. 

What makes the title so exceptionally special is the clever way that CD 
technology has been utilised to derive the maximum entertainment and edu- 
cational benel,ts from what would otherwise be a pleasant, but short story . 

The story is told using a digital 'book', a graphic representaton of the original 
book On the left hand page is a digitised Beatrix Potter picture, and on the right 
is the accompanying text. Using (he control pad you can manipulate a cursor. 

D-GENERATI0N 



£ 29.99 -MIHDSCAPE- 0444 
246333 

Here's another straight port over of an 
existing ifrbit product, but this one 
hasn't fared so well, in the process. 

The game's plot has you as a 
courier trying to work your way 
through the floors ot a genetic 
mutant-infested building, rescuing 
Civilians and securing the building as 
you go. Why you as a parcel boy 
should be any better suited to this 
than the numerous employees of thn 
company who are presumably used 
to dealing with these sort of situa- 
tions is beyond me. but MM... 

The game is viewed Irom an iso- 
metric 3D perspective so thai you 
can move in and out of the screen. 



and behind objects, The problem 
with games that use this perspective 
has always been how the controls 
should work. Does up on the joypad 
move vertically up on the screen 
(and hence diagonally to the north 
west in the game) or should it move 
north east on the screen (and hence 
north in isometric game world). I 
tend to think that the latter is a better 
solution as you spend more time 
moving in the four main compass 
directions than you do in the diago- 
nals. Unfortunately, Mindscape 
chose the former method, which is 
particularly irksome with the CD32's 
imprecise joypad because it means 
that most of your time is spent trying 
to hit precise diagonals on the con- 
troller just to move your character 



Position the cursor anywhere on the 
picture and click to receive a spoken 
description of the objecl beneath the cur- 
sor, If that object is Peter, you'll hear a 
little xylophone theme tune before an 
American male voice announces 'Peter 
Rabbit'. If you click on Mir MacGregOr you'll 
hear him humming the first lew bars of 
'Old Macdonald' before his name is also 
announced. As each character or object's 
name is announced, a white box appears 
containing their title. This is ideal because 
it helps younger children to associate the 
spoken and written word. 

If you double click on the picture, the 
selected object's name will again be 
announced but this time ihe name will be followed by the phonetic {Mis-ter 
Muh-Gre-gor) so that children can learn how to pronounce complicated words. 

When the child has spent enough time looking at the pictures, they can lis- 
ten to the story by clicking the speaker icon alongside the text A very genteel 
sounding English woman begins reading the words on the screen. As she 
does so the lines of text are highlighted so that the child can follow along. 

At various stages in the story, theme tunes are played to set the mood. 

CONCLUSION 

Peter Rabbit is an entrancing presentation which had me grinning for the 
entire time I watched It, Everyone I show it to is similarly impressed. The 
sound quality is a little dubious, and Oiscis really could have invested m a stu- 
dio recording. However children are not so discerning so show 
me a young child who wouldn't enjoy it, arid III show you a C' JKffi 
alien from the planet Zog! 





around on the screen This was bad 

enough when you could use your 
own joystick, but unbearable with the 
CD controller. 

This is such a major aggravation 




that I personally wouldn't spend long 
playing whal was at besl an average 
game on floppy disk. 

Oh, and by the way, it comes in a 
cheapo cardboard gatefold packet 
instead ol a CD case loo. 



CONCLUSION 



Bad controls, lack-lustre graphics, 
irritating sound and bad controls 
(yes I know I mentioned this twice, 
but it bears repeating') mean that O- 
Qeneration is definitely not 
at the top ot my 'must 
have list', 



156 




D ROM 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 




DEMO II 



£19.99 - ALMATHERA • 081 687 0040 



Having spent £300 on your CD32, 
you don't want to have to spend 
thousands more pounds in order lo 
enjoy it. This disk brings you maxi- 
mum variety and maximum value 
for money. 

As its name suggests, the disk is 
primarily filled wilh demos ol one sort 
or another. The program loads to 
present you with the Amiga 
Workbench screen on which Ihere 
are a number of drawers, each con- 
taining files of a specific type. 

The modules drawer contains 
over 2000 individual tunes, ranging 
from rave to classical. Of course 
these are not CD audio tracks, but 
they do represeni some of the best 
music that the Amiga has to offer. 

At the moment you can! buy a 



disk drive for CD32, although one is 

planned For release early nexi year. 
When if arrives musicians will doubl- 
less appreciate the &O0C+ sound 
samples stored on Ihe disk. 

Once you've gol some music 
playing, you might like to look at the 
Animation drawer which contains 
dozens of animations. Many of these 
are Vista Pro landscape animations, 
but there are also offerings by Eric 
Schwrart.7 as well as demos created 
on Jake 2, Cinemofph, Visionairre 
and Morpn Pius. For me this direc- 
tory contained the most interesting 
and exciting stuff on the CD. 

There's also a graphics directory 
containing hundreds of pictures in 
different screen formats. CDW own- 
ers will unfortunately not be able lo 
view all of the screens in this direc- 
tory as many of them require the 
AGA chip set to be displayed. 

In yet another directory there are 
dozens of demos, most of which 
combine a funky soundtrack with 
some form of clever animation. 





Again, some of 
these demos 
will be unusable 
without a CD 3-2. 

The final 
drawer contains 
a selection of 
PD games 
which vary in 
quality and type. 
In fact there are 
over 100 titles, not all of which work 
with CD32. 

Many of the programs and games 
will require a mouse in order to work 
properly, and this should be one of 
your highest priorities, if you already 
own an Amiga, you can use a stan- 
dard mouse. 

Unfortunately a small percentage 
of the stuff on the disk seems to 
crash, or simply doesnl work at all. 
Also, it's very irritaling lo have to 
manually rest the CD32 in order to 
exit a large number of the demos 
and games. Not only does this waste 
time while the Workbench loads 
again, it also means you have to 
keep getting out ol bed! 

CONCLUSION 

Demo 2 provides an excellent an 
inexpensive method of acquiring a 
large and varied selection of pro- 
grams for yourCD-32, Sure there are 
no commercial games here, but 
there is a good and interesling 
assortment of stuff to keep you occu- 
pied for weeks if not monlhs. 

CDTV & C D32 - Some ^^ 
stuff requires a mouse. 1fA*£fo 



NOW THAT'S WHAT I CALL GAMES 1 



1 9.99 - MUM MEDIA MACHINE 

If your interests are purely games 
based, perhaps this bargain litle 
might appeal to you. 

II contains fifty PD and fifty share- 
ware games. The lilies include 
remakes of classic board games 
such as Mastermind and Risk, not to 
mention reworkings of computer 



-0204 363608 

favourites like Arkanoh, 

Unsurprisingly there is some 
cross-over between the titles included 
here, and those of Demos 2 reviewed 
above, however the collection is a 
great starter for your games library. 

A mouse is essential to play 
many of the titles. 



CONCLUSION 

A good way to acquire lots of classic 
games, and it occupies a lot less 
space than 1 00 disks! 

CDTV & CD32 - Some 
stuff requires a mouse. 






CONNOISSEUR 
COLLECTION 

£34.99 -ALMATHERA -081 
687 0040 

Tor those of you with more refined sen- 
sibilities, the Connoisseur Collection is 
an excellent litle which wilt please 
CDTV and CD32 owners alike. 

The CD contains a massive collec- 
tion of digilised an ranging between the 
pre-classical and early twentieth cen- 
tury periods. 

When the program first loads you'll 
hear a classical CD audio track play- 
ing. There are a choice of ten tracks, 
and regardless of Ihe one you 
choose, the others will be played in 
sequence afterwards. 

The title screen gives you the option 
of choosing to examine the works from 
a particular artistic period, Renaissance 
or Baroque for 
instance. If you 
specify a particu- 
lar period, the 
display will switch 
lo show you 
some text about ihe period you've cho- 
sen. At any point whilst reading the text 
you can choose 10 find Out aboul a 
specific artist of the age, viewing his 
pictures or finding out about his life and 
motivations. 

By default, the pictures which are 
uniformly excellent, will be shown with- 
out accompanying text, but by pressing 
Up on your controller you can find out 
further facts about Ihe image being 
shown, such as what it represents, or 
its inspiration or perhaps some Olher 
nugget of information. 

The main menu also offers you the 
option to jump directly to a specie artist, 
or simply to browse Ihrough the hun- 
dreds of digitised pictures in Ihe gallery. 

CONCLUSION 

The Connoisseur Collection is a beau- 
tiful, inspiring work which will bring 
pleasure to anyone who's interested in 
art and the famous artists. The pic- 
lures are of uniformly excellent quality, 
and whNsl the music is not really up to 
ihe same high standards, the tunes 
have been chosen with great care and 
ihey add greatly lo one's viewing plea- 
sure, 

CDTV & CD32 



157 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



CD ROM 




TH : SOFTWARE 

Okav so we ve looked at some of the titles that are already available, now it's time to look at the big picture 
with the definitive software list for CD32 and CDU We II start with the CD32 specific stuff. 
CD32 SPECIFIC TITLES 



TTTli 



PUBLISHER 



Diggers 

f*lcw Thais WflttCalGHrTB6 1 Multimedia Mactwia 
MfcKWStoe-Flair 



Oscar 

O-Genaration Mmdscape 

Jamas Pond 2 (RoeOOdf Millennium 

Pmtta.ll Fantas»es 

Zool 

Sleepwalker 

Whale's 

OverkilL'Lunar C 

Sensible 

Deep Core 

Trolls 

Mo«ph 

Dangerous S*« 

Mean Arenas 

Total Carnage 

Beavers 

Myth (AG*,) 

Sup<f Putty 

Int. Karate-* 

KS40 

Bubble 6 SqueeK 

Jurassic Park 

Legend 01 Sorasil (AGAI 

U'l Otvil 



DESCRIPTION 

100 PD oamas 
arformgame 
Arcade 

game 
I'mbali simutalor 
FlaHomn game 
Platform game 



RELEASEUM! RW> TTTIE 



PUBL1SHEH 



KSCWTKM 



RELEJISEIATE RW 



CMW 




Qui now 
Oil Now 
Out MOW 
Out Now 
Out Mow 
CKjI NiV« 
Out Ml.* 
Out Now 

OutNoW 



Int. Computer E«leflBiwnarH 
Compiler Entertainment 
Graiidsiam 



airorm game 
oialform 
Beat 'tin up 
Maze game 
Shod 'am up 



Out No* 
Qui How 

Oui r*ih 
Out Now 
Ou^ New 
liT.-nine'-l 




System 3 



Audiogenic 



Pl.vrtorm Game 
& INMll 

Platlomn game 

adventura 
B«*1 ern up 

platform game 



immtnent 
Imminon! 
Imminent 



Imrt 
Imminent 



lr*nine-| 



Winter Super Sports 

Traps & Treasures 

Tia Break 

Arabian Might* (A@A> 

7 GalOSQ' Jambala (AGA} 

LqfusTurftoTrtom 

Ryder Cup GoM 

Aeach Out For Gold 

Suft Ninjas 

Alfred Chit 

Castles II 

Lofd ol the Ring* 2 

Fury ol the. Fumes 



Defender ol the Crown 2 
Donk Special Edition 
Insight Technology 
Caesar Detune/Cohort 2 
Grolier's Encyclopedia 2 

Humans I & II 
Trivial Pursuit* 
60 Karaoke Hits 
Liverpool looW** 
Syndicate 

Hunt tor R«J October 
Chambers of Shac m 
Wick FakJO'S Golf 
ri7Cnallerqe 
Project X 



Grandslam 

I - It'll, lit 



Tennis game 
Platform gam* 
nil- 





Ocean 

Mfcwalue-mr 

Microvalua-Flair 

Mimdscape 

Inlarplay 

littwflay 

Mind&capo 

Now MattoCommoOora 

Sachs EnlCommodoro 

Supervision Ent. 

Opionica,'Cofnmodofe 

Soltflaie Inspiration 

Xchia&'^nmmodore 

Audiogenic 

Gametek (UK) 
tJuitiMli 

Multimedia Machine 

Grartdafa 

Bull! 

Q 



GoUgame 

BjJufLl 
B*al 'em up 
Platform 
Siryiogy 
Adventura 
Platform 
Education 
Strategy 
PtUtorni 
Education 
Strategy 
Education 
Arcade adventure 



Inim.nent 
Imminent 
Imminani 



Immrvent 
Imminent 
Imminent 



30/11*3 
30/11/93 

30,'-n/»3 

30/11/93 

3a'ii.'9a 
01/12/99 




01/12/93 

01/1 293 
01/1 2/93 
01/12*93 



01/12/93 



£0 
£ 19.99 

£29.99 

tap <t9 

£29.98 

£?9 99 



£29.99 
£24 99 

E25 99 
C29.69 
£29 99 
£29.99 



£29.99 
E»iM 



£29 39 
El 4. 99 
£H.99 
£14.99 

£29.99 
£34.99 




£14 99 
£14.99 
£29.99 
£34.99 
F29 99 
£29.99 
£29.99 
£29.99 
£29.99 
£29 99 
E2fi 93 
E2*« 



£2*99 
£2699 

£33 99 

£34.99 

£134.99 

£29.99 



£29.93 
£29.99 

£29.99 
£29.99 
£29 99 




ANen Breed Special E(J 
OWAK 



Shadows of the Wind 
50 game compendium 



Arcade 
A/cade 
Ari;.K>c 

images ' Unknoiwn 

IntematJCfltf Computer Ent, Various 
I nfernslonal Computer Enl. Platform 



oviafla 

01,'i2''93 
01/12^3 
01/1 2J93 

ul'Z,"-J3 



UbwHton (AGA) 
Utopiall 
Chaos Engine 



electronic Arts 

MinOseape 

Gramlin 

Renegade 




Adttqa Americsn, Football PtalteotfJComnioaora 
Twncpn HI Renegade 

Pirate's Gold Mien 

Pully Squad Systom 3 

Thalllon t 

Knsalis 

Acotakn 

Suparvisiori 
ActiflMn 
Mlllenn jn 

•3' Ili^.I.l 
Renegade 
Bullfrog 
Stena 




Lover's Guide 




01.12^3 £34.i 



Shaol ~e<n up 



01/12/93 



Ef4.99 
£14,99 



Mortal «on**t 

Jamas Pond III 

Nick Faldo s Gdf Deluxe 

Elf Mania 

TnemePa 

King's Quest & 

WdfH Class 

Soccer Kid IQIwfc 

Flight ol Amazon CMm Reneoai 

p.- ; .y lyt'ilennium 

Inferno Ocean 

Star Tr#-JudgamBiH Ritas Interplav 

Tcp Gear II 

Stone Keep 

Jungle Strike 

Desert Sfnke 

Skeleton KtW" 

Kick Oft I II 

England Wond Cup '94 

Warid Cup Football 

Claws 

Tuihead 

Powerslide 

!..i,: I! |ii 

Gods 

James Pond 4 

Virtuoso 

Career Planner 

SsJaty in If* Home 
~)i :l i ii lKive Driving 

Law ol the Layman 

Inlematcral KaraW Dekjxe S-yslftm 3 

Pal Cam Rwa - 4Dt 

KTM MOtDCT055 

Mountaio Biking 

Din Hacer EMu Systems 

AFlBrSftOC* Elite Systems 

TrnhCHl Salalll* Mirags 

Champki^hlp Manager Oomark 

5tar rrak 26 An- mi-=.ay nu.Miila-, 




Mirage 
Gremta 
Mid nprosa 
Elite SysltiTIS 
Mi "roiiriiiim 
Renegade 
Millennnjm 
Elte 

Riva - 4DI 
RWa- 4DI 
Rrva -4-1 : 1 
Riva - 4DI 



Renegade 
Rrva-401 



flPG 
RPG 
Strategy 
ArtHlli: 

Sport gam* 

Arc*Ja 

Strategy 



01/12/93 
I cv 12/93 
10/12/93 

1!ii' 12,93 

1 via/as 



15/ 12.-93 



ktJl ,'94 




PlullOfrn game 

Ptatform 

Slratefly DlWlnM 

Saat'emUp Ol^lKiW 

Aduk Edutainment (?1/uOi , 94 



BwN-emUp 

Ptaiform gjatne 

Gotr 

Beat 'pi up 

Strategy 

RPG 

Grid* game 



Ol/oaf84 

01.X)3,'94 

ffla/94 

r}1,'03.'94 

;n,u^,'94 
01/03/84 



Q1JMM 




Arcade 

GrepniC •dvwiture 01/0*64 

F3ea< Em Up 01/04.'194 

Space game 01/04.^ 

Aicaoe adventure □1.'0b.'^4 

nggam* 01nW9* 

Adventure strategy (Jt/OS, 1 *! 

shoot Km MP 
Sir*!. artoot'Bm up 
30 Shoot "am up 
Fcx^baP game 
Soccer gam* 
Soccer game 




01/1 

DliOiW 
01,tl5rg4 
CH.'0&. , 94 
01/06/94 
0UQO94 

Unknown 01/07/94 

Ofl-raed racing aim Ot/IOVW 
Straiegj 01/1 &94 

Arcade adventure 01/10/94 
Ai<:afle 01'1D'"9* 



01M1W 



Edutijficin 




Education 
Eckj^anon 



Fiyrimg game 
Edutainment 



01 VI 2^94 
01/1294 

01,'12,'94 

01/12/94 



Driving 
EdutartMM 



01/12/94 



Driving 

Hefeopler Sim 

Unknown 

Sin 

Scwe advenlerfi 



t14M 

';ii 99 

£14.99 

M'A 

£29 99 



91, '01, '9* 
OlrOI/95 

0l.'Ut/95 
Ur*riO«n 



£34.99 
£29.99 

£2a.99 
E2999 



£29.99 



Mp'A 

rza 99 
£29,99 

T29.99 



£34 99 
£34.99 

£34 99 



£29 99 
£29.99 

£29.99 

E?9,99 

WA 

M/A 



M/A 



NfA 



M/A 



£29.99 

£29 99 
£59 99 

£34.99 
£29 99 
£29 99 
£39.99 



£29.99 



1:29,99 

£29 99 

N/A 

£29.99 

£29.99 

M/A 
WA 

N/A 
N/A 
N A 



158 



CD ROM 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 




4' ^^ 




&**MM^ 


****** 




^^y 




J_"jP oc 


* -IL* 4 










CDTV SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE WITH CD32 

TITLE COMMENTS PRICE 



EDUCATIONAL 

A Bun for B*may 
A Long Hard day at the Ranch 
Aslara Englwh for French 1 
Asian* Enghah for French 2 
Altera: French tor English 1 
Asienx French tor English 2 
Barney Bear Goes Camping 
Ht y li^m [iuusto BdnHl 

FunSchool 3 (under 6'f) 

FunSchool 3 1 5-' 

FunSchool 3 |oi»r Ta) 

rHMthir Hits Her First Home Run 

LTV English 

Moving Gwsg Me Stomach Ache 

Mud F'..:': Hi; 

My" ami 

North Polar Expedniwi 

Paperbag 

r>c:;<ry Pnnms Fnr Roliem Kids 

Tala of Berwamin Bunny 

Tale or Pgier Rabbit 

Thoma* Snowsu* 

ENTERTAINMENT 



Air Warrior 
Ml Oop Go To 




Aslsnx & Son 

EJatlleehess 

Ballleslocn 

Case ot in* Caujiou* Condor 

CDPCm . Requires a mouse 

CDP02. Requires a 

nnPH^. RoQuires r "i mouse 

Classic Board Games 

Pwkmder ol lr>e Grown 

Dome Collection 1 . P«qulr*4 A rYWu*e 

Orxjsaurs For Hire 

Fantastic Voyaoa 

practual Universe 

Global Cha*. 

■3 jy Spy 

Hound (4 me Bi 

Lemmings 

a'* CO 

Psycho Killer, Aaqulr** a mouM 
Raffles 



Snoopy - Case of the Miasaig Blanked 
Taam Vanfcee 



Require**! 

ukes CD32 keyboard 
Ftriquirrs 1*113? keyboard 
Requires CD32 keyboard 
Hny^uirris GPS?, keyboard 
Requires a mouse 
Requires a mouse 





lies a disk drive 
Ftequirfts CC32 k«yt>Qard 
Requires a mouse 
Require* Cm? kirytxumd 
Requires a mouse 



Keyboard/dnve recommended 
rd/drive recommended 
Kjeyboard''dnve recommended 
Require* ■ mous* 

KeyboaidjoVive recommerKterJ 



Requires a mouse 
Mf: .inrkoytinii"d 



Sftght Sound Fau* 



CM .99 
Requires a mouse 



£29.09 

£34.99 
£34,99 
£34.99 
£34.99 
£34 99 
£29-99 
£29 99 





£24.99 

£19 99 
£39 99 
C19 99 

r-9?9 
£1999 




C19.99 
£24.99 

s:i4gg 
£19 99 

£14.99 
£34 99 
E29 99 
£29.99 
E34 99 

E1999 
E9 99 

£4.99 



Tie Break Tennis 



■T19.99 
£29 99 

£34.99 
E24.S9 

£34.99. 
£24 99 




TITLE 

Town With No I 
Trivial Pursuil 
Xenon II 

ARTS & LEISURE 

Advanced 

Animals in Motion 

Connoln«w ol f m# Arts 

Fruns A Vegetables 

Garden PI 

Guinness Disc of Records 

indoor Plant* 

Stamps ol France & Monaco 

Women m Motion 

REFERENCE 

Am»rte»n HerHeg* Wotlonjry 

Illustrated Works of Shakespeare 

rjr.weemao 

Groliar's Encyclopaedia 

Hulehin&on's Encydopeedia 

lllusl-aled Holy Eli Die 

Mew Basics Electronic Coe*l 

Timetable ol Business Pol 

rimi^aWeorSciar™ 

MUSIC 

Music nl our 

BUSINESS 

InlsrOrftce 



COMMENTS 

■; .j'iI sound faull 

I tauH in the shop 



Requires a mouse 
Requires a mou 
Hi!i|:iin.i!s ,i rnoUM 
II 



Requires a mouse 



PRICE 



£49.B9 





CDTV TITLES NOT CD32 COMPATIBLE 

EDUCATIONAL 

Japan Worid 
Mil ii I Rur 



ENTERTAINMENT 

Chaos in Am 

Logical 

PrBy - an Alian Encounter 

Kliiirlunk r fiiln-iii:; 

Cursa of Ra 
Wralh ol lha Demon 
TumCari I 




REFERENCE 

Worid Visla Atlas 
American tfisla Atlas 
MUSIC 
ti'..:. c Maker 
Karaoke Hils 1 
I .i.i Remix 




Many thanks to Commodore for their invaluable assistance in compiling the above lists. 



1G9 




Public domain Software 



Order hotline. 0793 4909881 

[A] 




UTMJflC. 1 BDtKAVOH*. 



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WITH EVERY 



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Music 



Music 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



ft is said that music hath charms to 
soothe the savage beast. I don't know 
whether or not that's true, bat Amiga 
owners certainty have plenty of oppor- 
tunities to test the theory. 



Those Amiga designers cer- 
tainly were a clever lot; not 
only did they give it graphics 
that were the envy of the 
home computer world, they gave it the 
ability to replay fi-bil sound samples, 
and even to generate its own internal 
instruments. 

This has naturally meani that the 
Amiga has become popuJar both as a 
home music tool, and just for the sheer 
quality of the sound effects in its 
games. 

Whereas graphics had to undergo 











»nn * 




^^^k inti* * 






rutin 

























Son/* was one of the Amiga's earliest music 
packages, bul il wasn't very sophisticated. 



years of developmem before we 
started to see really superb stuff 
appearing as commonplace, the 
Amiga's sound has always been 
entailed as one of its strongest fea- 
tures, although naturally that too has 
progressed over the years, 

Nowhere was this progression 
more evident than in ihe games 
scene. In the early days, games had 
good' music, and made use of samples 
but the sound was generally thought ol 
as no more important than the colour 
of a screen sprite, or the shape ot the 
game's bo*. 

CONNECTION 

All that changed with the release of 
Xenon 2, a shoot 'em up from the 

Bitmap Brothers. It had a really snappy 
litle tune which was a specially com- 
missioned remix of Bomb the Bass' 
Ihen-current chart hit Megablasl. Both 
The Bitmaps and the press raved 
about Ihe tune, gncf from jhen on 
music gained a whole new signifi- 
cance in games. It wasn't long before 
Betty Boo and Snap got in on the act. 
In fact, there was an entire game 
based around ihe litle of Snap's chart 
hit Ooops Up, 

Although the Amiga world was now 
aware ot the music industry, ihe music 



industry was certainly nol falling over 
itself to use ihe Amiga. At the time, the 
Atari ST and the Amiga were still fierce 
rivals in the home market, and 
because the ST was fitted with a MIDI 
interface as standard, il became 
known as THE machine for home 
musicians. 

Despite the Amiga's superior pro- 
cessor speed and friendlier operating 
environment, it never really overcame 
the ST in its own ground, but as Atari's 
machine has gradually lost oul to the 
Amiga and PCs in other areas (games 



and business software for example) so 
too. its music following has diminished. 
The Amiga on the other band has nat- 
urally benefitted from a potential world 
market of nearly lour million machines, 
and so the professional music soft- 
ware developers finally Started to take 
it seriously, releasing sequencers such 
as Or T's KCS and Bars & Pipes. 

TRACKER TO THE 



Perhaps most influential in the Amiga's 
growth as a home music machine has 




Bomb Ito BIS* - Created 
Amiga vtttion CI Moptttlnsl 
lor tise in 1 h* gam* Xenon 2. 
early Boo - Created an Amiga 
version at Uoirf the Do lor use 
In Ihe game Magic Packets. 
Snap - Used! Chris Hulscechi 
ThtoX program BKle-nsivBly 
when working on (hair second 
ill bum 

Evelyn qiftiiiii* - 
Acknowledged as the world's 
greatest classical petcusai on. 
Ist, her entire studio is baaed 
around an JUOOO MIDI selup 
using Bars A Pipes Pro I. 
Uleh Saints - Responsible far 

a tamer cool lun* in th« intto 
to Burning aubf>6t. 







been the massive interest in tracker 
type programs, These programs were 
originally designed as a programmer's 
tool for creating music in demos and 
games. However, as Ihe general pub- 
lic got holdof 1hem, trackers such as 
Master Souncilracker and Prosound 
became extremely popular because 
they allowed ordinary people to write 
music on Iheir Amigas. Better yet, 
these ptograms were all free, so it 
didn't cost the user a penny to get into 
the scene. As the programs became 
more popular, they were upgraded SO 
that nowadays many of them have fea- 
tures thai wouldn't look ooi ol place in 
a commercial package. 

Coincident with the increase In 
tracker popularity was a change in ihe 
pop music scene towards sample ori- 
ented and remix based music The 
Amiga was at lest in its element. With 
a host of sound samplers costing as 
little as £25, and the software to 
manipulate them, a new generation of 
musicians was bom. The demo scene 
abounded and indeed still abounds 
with a rich variety of tracker created 
dance music, much of it commercial in 
quality. 

For the last couple ot years, the 
Amiga has appeared from time to time 
on television and in the media demon- 
strating its power as a musical tool. In 
the hands of prof essionals it will do 
anything you could it ask to. 

Appearances on Top ol the Pops 
and Tomorrow's World seem to con- 
firm the Amiga's place in Ihe 
professional market, and with compa- 
nies such as Blue Ribbon and 
Mindscape investing hundreds of 
thousands into Amiga music hard; 
ware development, our favourite 
computer seems certain io have a 
good future ahead of il. 



SffiSP 



■ 



Trie Amiga has a loyal following but 
unlortunaleiy il hasn't always gat Ihe 
public exposure and credit lhat il 
deserves, especially in Ihe music 
arena. This is perhaps due to the fact 
thai many musicians believe that liny 
are the sole creative Force behind (heir 
ward, and the tools thai enable litem to 
do what ihey do don'l gel a mention. 
However, there are a lew notable 
exceptions, where Ihe Amiga has been 
used by professional musicians who 
are far from shy about admitting to 
having used il, See the adjacent box 
lor mote details. 



» 



161 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Musi 



Music Composition Software 



PROTRACKER 3.1 

£1 .50 SEASOFT COMPUTING 0903 850378 




Prot^efcwl-3 ilia mosl pep*ilar PO tracker available. 



mum of four notes simultaneously. 
Each track is subdivided into 64 
lines, and its on those lines that you 
actually enter your notes and effetls. 
A group ol four tracks is known as a 
pattern, and you can define as many 
different patterns as you want. The 
clever thing is, using the Play Lisl 
you can specify the order in which 
ihese patterns are replayed, and you 
can even play the same one more 
than once. This means that you 
don't have to waste memory or time 



rewriting repetitious parts of a song. 

CONCLUSION 

Protracker has a long history and ii 
is still the choice ol a great many 
Amiga musicians, Whilst ii doesn't 
have the same editing features, or 
ultimate power as OctaMED, it is a 
very stable program, and is much 
easier to use. For little more than the 
price of a disk, you can buy it 
and f i nd out for yourself. Sf^ 4 
Compalible: Any Amiga T " 



it doesn't matter how 
powerful your computer or 
instruments are if you don't 
have a way to compose and 
record four music. In the old 
days that meant that you 
had to be able to play an 
instrument in real-time, and 
you would then record vari- 
ous tracks of your music 
using a multitrack tape 
recorder or studio. 

Nowadays the computer 
has freed us from such 
restrictions. You don't have 
to be able to play an instru- 
ment, and you don't need 
expensive recording equip- 
ment AH you need is 
imagination and the right 
software and you can record 
multipie tracks for next to 
nothing. 

Derived from Ihe original 
Soundtracker prog ram , 
Frofracfceris the most popu- 
lar public domain tracker 
program available. But how does it 
compare to the commercial offerings? 

In actual tact it compares very 
well, but then this is no surprise 
because they were both developed 
from the same origins and like its 
main commercial rival, Protracker 
has been constantly upgraded since 
it was first written. 



jfl^Ejun ° f ™ B Have You Considered... ? 



The heart of the program is the track 
window which contains lour editable 

tracks, each ol which is assigned to 
one ol the Amiga's four sound chan- 
nels. The two inside iracks replay 
through one channel whilst the outer 
ones play through the other. Thus 
it's possible to create a stereo image 
when composing and playing a 
song. 

Each track consists ot a lisl of 
numbers and letters, and these rep- 
resent ihe notes which are to be 
played as well as the instruments to 
use and any special effects thai are 
to be applied to them. Despite ihe 
fact that this approach seems more 
complicated initially, once you learn 
how to use it, it is slightly easier than 
a notation-based system. 

Notes can be entered from the com- 
puter keyboard, ihe keys or which ane laid 
out ike- a two octave musical keyboard. In 
other words the 'Z to V" keys .are equiva- 
lent to the white keys of a musical 
keyboercJ, whilst the 'A' - ¥ keys repre- 
sent the bbck ones. The-entire layout is 
repealed on Ihe next two rrjws up as well. 

RECORD A SONG 

You can enter notes one at a time or, 
by selecting Record, you can literally 




'play' the computer keyboard whilst 
Protracker records your actions. 
However, you can only enter one 
note at a time on any track, and 
Protracker m\\ only replay a maxi 



DATAFILES 1 & 2 

£14.99 EACH - TIME & SPACE - DM2 870&B1 

Goth Irarter programs an Ihis page are capable rj< loading and replaying sou nd samples. If 
you own a sampler you might like to record your own sounds, but it's lar easier simply lo 
use someone else's pre-recorded sounds. 

Among Ihe commercial offerings you might like to consider are Dalai lies Volumes 1 and 
Z. Volume 1 consists of five disks ol dance music drum loops tanging 1?nm pounding club 
style sounds. In Intricate tribal and bongo sounds. Volume I contains vocal loops and 
elfecls, ranging Irom human bealbOM sounds, to soulful ad-libs and James Brown 
screeches, 

CONCLUSION 

The samples vary in quality from very good lo average. The sets are guile ^^^ 
inexpensive compared lo the Gajitsets and they will greatly enhance ■^Sft* 

your music collection il you like to compose dance music ^^^cp 

Compatible: Any Amiga 



What About. J 

QUARTET 

£49.99 - HISOFT - 0525 713671 

If the tracker approach is loo confusing and 
notation programs are loo expensive, perhaps 
a cheap hybrid ol the two is your best answer. 

Quartet is dearly based upon the tracker 
programs In thai it uses a numerical approach 
io music creation, however it allemptsto 
pretty this up by giving you musical staves on 
which lo place you moles. 

fielore you can do lhat you'll need to load some samples, and these are loaded individually 
nr in sets ol four. Ths program supports a ma*i mum ot lou r sets - sixteen sa mp les i n all. 

The music editor provides you with tour slaves each o1 which is linked lo one ol Ihe 
Amicus sound channels. Each ol Ihe staves is divided inlo little hoies each of which rep- 
resents a position where you can pul a nole using the mouse. 

When positioning noles you can choose Irom any of the lour hanks ol lour samples, and 
you may specily whether the sound should be played high, low or medium (different 
octaves}. Thais it really Songs can again be saved as stand alnne pieces which don 1 
need Ihe program to be replayed. 

CONCLUSION 

The prugram doesn'1 really contain any of Ihe slrenglhs nl either style ol music patterns, 
hut it's bright and very easy to use. It's cheap enough too. so yau might /^ftt 
consider Ihis ii you can't get along with the tracker urograms. ^Q^^3 

Compalible: Any Amiga 




162 




USIC 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE '94 



OCTAMED PRO 5 

£30 SEASOFT COMPUTING 0903 850378 




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Edi* 1 Snict 1 Chard QlDn^Offl 1 J I j j I J I I I fs«t|C!r 



Q|12 



Amigas cannot load the new ver- 
sion , but as we keep saying, if 
you're serious aboul your Amiga 
shouldn't you be thinking about an 
upgrade by now? 




u| Notation control 






Ol Psetl | Shown 

Uhu»t J.J__2 



I 



Setgct MlA2L3l3lal£l 



_d-BjjgJ-aJMZ]S_l_l 



Chip! 06*1419032 Fast: B8832818B8 



Stopped - 



Freeze Di£.f>tdV 



If you took the best 
tracker program 
available and added 
every possible extra you 
could think of, you'd 
have something pretty 
close to OctaMED Pro! 



Like Protracker, OctaMED 
uses a primarily character 
based approach to music 
composition bul, unlike (he 
former program, OctaMED supports 
a whacking G4 tracks if you're using 
MIDI, and even using jusl sound 
samples you can replay up to eight at 
a lime 

EFFECTS GALORE 

The program supports an impressive 
array of effects such as arpeggios 
and pilch and volume slides- These 
are primarily designed to be applied 
10 samples and using them wilfi MIDI 
is often difficult if not impossible. 
Even so, as a MIDI sequencer it's by 
far your cheapest option, and as lar 
as sound sample replaying goes, the 
program is totally unrivalled. 

Part of what makes it so special is 
ils huge variety of editing tools, 
including a sampler, synth sound edi- 
tor and even a tool (or combining 
both. In fact, when it comes to instru- 
ment handling, OctaMED Pro is the 
only tracker which can handle nine 
octaves as well as loading five 
octave samples, 

It includes a comprehensive on- 
line help facility which can be 
accessed by simply pressing ihe help 
key. And talking of key presses, key- 



OclnMED's greatest strength is the quantity and quality of Ils editing tools, which between 
them mean IhHl music creation l» tar cetfor [nan with olher prog rams. 



board shortcuts are available for vir- 
tually every action. Version 5 is the 
result of a radical redesign which 
also produced an entirely OS legal 



program that will happily multitask, 

and which looks every bit the 
Workbench 2 program that it is. This 
sadly means that owners of pre-2.0 



OctaMED has undergone steady 
development over the lasl few years, 
and with each new version the pro- 
gram gels even better. Version 5 will 
take a while for old users to get used 
to as the screen layout is radically 
different but-with time H will become 
apparent that the new design is even 
more flexible than the old one- 
There isn't a program in the 
price range that comes close, and 
many full -price music programs 
could take several leaves out of 
OctaMED's book, 

A thoroughly well thought out pro- 
gram and well worth the asking price. 

Compatible: 2.0 ^^^ 

Amigas and above with (?T*Efa 
1 Mb or more. K^jfP 






Have You Considered...? 



■ 






GAJITS SAMPLE SERIES 

E2.95 EACH OR £39.95 FOR ALL FIVE 
GAJITS ■ 061 236 2515 

II you need sortie tap quality sampled instruments, you could do 
worse than check nut Ihe Ga jits Sample series. 

tach dish in Hie set contains dozens of Instruments of a particu- 
lar type, antf there are live one-disk sels available: Percussion & 
Effects, Guitars & Strings. Brass & Woodwind, Synth & Vocals, 
Piano and Keyboards. 

The Percussion and Effects disk contains some particularly nice 
sounds such as dog harks, streams, laser and machine guns, 
screeching cars and telephones which are ideally suited for games 
programmers to include in their work. 

As Willi the Datalile samples, the quality varies from sample to 
sample, although these are alt sampled at a substantially lower 
rate which does redact on Ihem slightly, 

CONCLUSION 

Each d isk conta i ns a generous number ol samples, and this is by 
lar the cheapest way of acq uiri ng such a broad selecti on ol authen- 
tic instrument sounds. Worth a look. 
Compatible:: Any Amiga - 

AMFCPRQ 

£10 - SEASOFT COMPUTING - 0903 850378 

The trouble wilh Ihe Amiga's music scene is that there are Jusl too 
many different music packages, and liles can't be exchanged 

between them, Or atleasl 

Ihey couldn't until AMFC -"wrc Prof.m Pn .t ca ,i> ei«a 

came along,.. 

>nW£ stands for Amiga 
Music File Converter and 
It's a utility lOr converting 
music liles from one 
music larmal lo another 
11 supports eight different 
tile types and will convert 
a file in any one of them 
10 any Other supported 



format. The file types are HMO {QtlaMEty, MM1 [QctaMED\. Oktal 
I OMah/wanri other eight track packages), Music! i Junior and 
Senior), Slat IStartraetet), NT/ST iHoisetrffkw/SmaStmkumi 
compatibles) and SMUS {Deluxe Music and Sonti}. 

Sumeol the formats require the user Is take additional action 
before a conversion csn be made, but in most cases it's simply a 
mailer of selecting. Ihe lile to be converted and specifying the out- 
put file and directory. JAffCwill automatically delect Ihe larmal of 
Ihe mpui Ii9e, and will deal with it appropriately. 

1 1fied Ihe program with same old OktatyserUies, and it converted 
them perfectly in a second or two, retaining the original samples 
as well. When I tried il with Amiittiles, it converted Ihe notes, but 
had trouble with same of the instruments. The program can handle 
,55 (sampled) sounds hot cannot deal wilh Sonin proprietary .instr 
synthetic sound lormat. in tact it can '1 deal wilh any synthetic 
sounds at all. This isn't ready a great problem because you can 
always load new samples in once the tile has been loaded into its 
destination package, if you use OctaMED you can even create your 
own synlhsounds to match those thai wouldn't convert. 

CONCLUSION 

AMFC Is a very handy utility for Amiga musicians At last It's pos- 
sible to convert your entire collection al modules into a single 
format. It's a great prly that the program can! deal with MIDI type 
Q or 1 files as this would mean lhal you could create fifes which 
were industry standard and could be exchanged with olher comput- 
ers. Neverihekss ; a superb program lhal should be In every 
musician's library. 
Compatible: Any Amiga with Krckstart 1.3 or higher 

BBr Snftuarr, HrilUn bw Br * *n tbon . 







i-rllPiriLE 

I 

. ustnuMO 



BZ.rrreTRiKi'! i; 



■I I III till! i ■ 



» 



163 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



Music 




Music Composition Software 



DELUXE MUSIC 
CONSTRUCTION 

SET 2.0 

£99.95 - ELECTRONIC ARTS ■ 0753 549442 




„ Ti n* lilj !■ H«i" ul "" ** 






_.**. ^ »— MM f I I * ■ - LE 



'•"* a i r** fir gn. f , '^; t 



Him.r. 1 MTIH Fll. 1 



if you think that bars 
and quavers are 
friendlier than patterns 
and tines then chances 
are this is the music 
package for you. 



The Deluxe Music Construction 
Set {DMCS) was first released 
in 1986 and has stood since 
then as the standard in home 
natation packages. There have been 
many other packages but none which 
were quite as easy to use, or as well 
designed, Having said thai, unlike 
Deluxe Paint which has been con- 
stantly upgraded since its initial 
release, Deluxe Music has remained 
unchanged for seven years despite 
the plea* from its users. Finally, in 
mid- 1 99a, after months of talking to 
existing users, a new version was 
revealed to the expectant woftd. 

The program uses a formal nota- 
ton system for note entry and 
display. In other words music is dis- 
played as a series of bars, each 
consisting of live ledger lines onto 
which you can place a variety of 



sixteer pari drch«£-ral score, you 
can print each part individually or as 
a group. Better yet, you can, even 
transpose staffs so that one can be 
used for a variety of parts. 

VERY GRAPHIC 

As you move around the various 
parts of the program you'll soon 
come to appreciate the graphical 
approach that its designer has 
taken. Everything can be achieved 
using the mouse, and the requesters 
and menus are delightfully unclut- 
tered making this ideal tor both the 
computer beginner and the music 
student, Now I wouldn't want you lo 
gel ihe impression thai DMCS is not 
a professional tool, it mos! certainly 
is, and there are options here that 
will only be appreciated by experi- 
enced musicians. It's just that it's 
such a great all-rounder, too. 

Incidentally, if you have a MIDI 
instrument, you can enter notes 
using that, although not in real-time 
unfortunately. You can also enter 
notes using a mini keyboard at the 
bottom ol the screen. 

The menus are absolutely full to 
bursting with helpful options to sim- 
plify your job. These are supported 



by the inclusion of ARexs so that 
you can automate many tasks. 

The program supports both MIDI 
and sampled instruments, and even 
lets you decide which speaker 
sounds should be played out of. You 
can also transpose instruments 
which is useful if you're scoring for 
clarinets, or badly recorded samples! 

CONCLUSION 

Deluxe Music Construction Set 2.0 is 
a worthy loll aw- up to the first ver- 
sion, but it's not perfect. It would be 
nice to see more effective MIDI file 
exchange, and more controllable 
score scrolling when a fune is being 
replayed. I would also like to have 
seen more special effects such as 
pitch slides, vibratos and so on. 
Still, to focus on the positive 
aspects, ihere's still not a notation 
package which can come close to it 
for user-friendliness or scoring fea- 
tures. DMCS2 provides you with the 
opportunity to create some really 
great tunes which look even better 
on paper than they do on the screen. 
Weil worth the money. 

Requires Kickstart 2 and 2 disk 
drives or 1 disk drive and a 
hard drive. 



notes ranging from a 64th note (a 
hemidemisemiquaver) up to a dou- 
ble note (a breve). 

ICON SELECTION 

Using the mouse, these notes are 
selected from a loot bar at the left of 
the screen. Then there are also tour 

different supplementary tool bars 
which appear to Ihe left of the main 
note bar. You can dedde which one 
will be displayed by clicking Ihe appro- 
pnate icon at the top of ihe screen. 
These sub bars allow you to modify 
the current notes or parts of the score 
by adding tuplets, pitch modifiers 
(sharps, flats or naturals), dots, 
beams, ties, dynamic modifiers and 
more. 

Between them, ihe tool bars let 
you shape both Ihe appearance and 
sound of your music, and unless 
you're working on classical pieces, 
they offer more than enough options 
to create professional looking 
scores. 

As I've already mentioned, a 
score is written on a series of staves 
(staffs), each consisting of live 
ledger lines. You can have up to 4B 
staves in a score, and ihese may be 
visible or not, as you require. This 
means that il you want to print say a 




Have You Considered.*.? 

THE RUDIMENTS & THEORY OF MUSIC 

£2 CD -ANY BOOKSHOP 

II «Hf « iust tauolil athua Ms*** fou'T* nearly antenna all Ihe sheet music you can 
l, ! Jou S o il SS be IMH Wore m counter scrotal) that *ou won t under- 
BrCboiVJoui assenlml oomoanlor. '* »•" "»™ an * i™""*"" to '»™ J J 
So if «i Le La revision aid lor sloderds who are ondergo.nuUny S<*°° I 
Most WwTS «'s ateolotaly poled Idt lining atari the mlncacn* ol the subject. 



What About? 



?8l QB KEY AUDIO SYSTEMS ■ 0245 M4001 

whal hey need ta have bin wifhout spending days learning what lo do hisl. 

Tta intV H o-ta* "■ W*-*" ™* f9 <"r r - ' r °^lVh°^leTo tunes 
replay «* n fl s and play your ettects along with .1. It comes suppled "'J* '"'"J dt Tjnes ' 
■Sri «Mdi has V* possible styles, which are simply variations on a Ihsme. 

££to repl'y the tuna and Iha music will ■«'•■«» '-"J^jj t "th " l a 2' 
board wu can iriuger one ul the supplement samples that are loaded with the soiid K 
■h sain > '"p" niriiv dance and n« based, these samples naturally consist o la wriij 
5 " Si w S E3 reams, ad-libs, electron* effects aiUp.mosa.va atritea . ■ o .«l>- 
SlieSiJe 3f into the tunes, M a few psoi -fta badly chosen as they don t fit In.o an, 

interactive etlorls are recorded in a sequence *hl&b. m he awed lo d«* lor liier replay. 

C 23 p^rtlcrierly sophi.lloated, and whi.sli. ', Ho I or a «m ^^X^ 
isfv an adull for yen, long. However, lo a child up lo the age ol XL or 13 I suspecl lhal n 
3 SiTliSidSl tf pleasure as ttay •.*- their ^tl »i»rt>>-o. —-. 
Compallblo: Any Amiga with Klekstart 1 ,3 or hiohar and 1Mb RftM. ^-^ 



164 




Music 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



SONIX 



£N/A*QXXI- 0101 310 427 1227 

if the idea of a notation package appeals to you hut Deluxe Music is either out- 
side your price range or seems a little complicated, Aegis' Sonix has something 
to offer. It is nearly as old as the original Deluxe Music, hut uses quite a differ- 
ent approach to notation editing, aiming for simplicity rather than absolute 
musical purity. 




Vou can um SontX keybcgrd lo test bolh your sample* and y«*ir ploying skills. 



COPYIST DTP 

£249 - KEY AUDIO SYSTEMS - 0245 344001 



There are times when you have to be able lo 
print out your music, either for other musicians 
to play, or so that you can sell it or store it tor 
posterity. There's no better way to do that than 
with Copyist DTP. 

The DTP stands for Desk Top Publisher, and lhal's 
exactly what this program is - a musical DTP system. 
If only it were as friendly lo use as Pro Page. 

Copyist is not designed for your run of the mil dab- 
bler, it's a very serious piece of kit with a deadly serious 
price tag, The only possible justification (or (his is the 
results it's capable of, and boy what results* A print out 
from this program is easily good enough tor publication. 

HORRIBLE EDITOR 

There are several ways of getting music into the pro- 
gram, but believe you me, importing a lite created with 
another program is the onfy one that you're going to 
warn to use, Why? Because editing with Copyist is 
cumbersome almost beyond ifie point of endurance. 
There's none of the easy point and click convenience 
of Deluxe Music, nor even the keyboard speed of 
OciaMED. Each note's stave position must first be 
indrcaied, ihen the note selected using the mouse or 
keyboard, Finally the note tail can be added. All this 
rigmarole means that each note may require many 
keystrokes and mouse clicks to position. I don't advise 
this as a viable entry means, it's simply horrible! 

Far more viable is the option to import a score as a 
MIDI type or 1 file or as a KCSor SMUS file. This 
means that you can import files created with Deluxe 
Music, Sonix, Bars & Ppesand, of course, Dr T's own 
KCS Version 2. This files musl then be converted into 
an intermediate state called a stream file. At this stage 
you can specify how many slaffs are to be used as 
well indicating the note resolution and time signature. 



The stream file must then be saved to disk before it 
can be used. Then load the stream file, and you're pre- 
sented with a whole load of additional options to help 
tailor the file to your requirements. Once the stream 
file has been loaded, il will automatically be displayed 
using your preferences. At this point you can choose 
to tweak the score just to add those extra bits lhat 
even the best music packages don't support. 

Once you've created the finished file, it can be 
saved as a MIDI file or printed. The program is sup- 
plied with a selection of special drivers including one 
for postscript printers. The print-outs really are abso- 
lutely excellent, and are easily good enough for 
commercial purposes. 

CONCLUSION 

Dr T's have a great deal to learn about user-friendli- 
ness, but fortunately the ultimate resufts Irom this 

program are just so damned good that despite the 
hassle of entering a score manually, it's still worth the 
effort The program is a tad expensive, and it's very 
hard to justify the expense unless yog really need 
good quality printed scores, but if you do, the program 
is a dream come true! 

Compatible: An Amiga with Kickslart , f ■%. 
1 3 or big her and 1 meg RAM ^jl^© 



VERY 

The main editing window consists of 
two staves; a treble clef and a bass 
clef. All notes are placed onto these 
two staffs. You Can preset time and 
key signatures before you start, but 
that's about as sophisticated as the 
program gets. To place a note onto 
the staff , click on one of the buttons 
1 -$ lo select a track, then select a 
note from the on-screen palette and 
simply place it on the screen at the 
end of the ledger line where you 
want it to appear. The note will slide 
along the line to the first available 
space and bar. This contrasts 
sharply with DMCS approach where 
notes are entered on a bar by bar 
basis and it's the instruments rather 
than the individual' which relate to 
specific channels. 

You can add a variety of instru- 
ments ranging from ordinary samples 
to Sonix' own proprietary .insfr for- 
mat, These are synthetic sounds 
which have been designed to play 
using the Amiga's internal envelope 
(waveform) generators. AH hough 
Ihey don't generally sound as good 
as sampled sounds, they occupy a 
fraction of the space in memory and 
on disk, and there are special: effects 
that can be done with synth-sounds 
that are impossible using samples. In 
fact, so useful are ihese synthetic 
sounds that Sonix has a separate 
section which you can use to gener- 
ate your waveforms, 

The program saves its songs as 
SMUS files, but the instruments can- 
not be saved with the file unlike the 
other programs reviewed here. 
Whilst Ihis can be inconvenient, it 
can work out to your advantage 
when several songs on the same 
disk use the same basic instruments, 
because they can simply share a sin- 
gle set. 

CONCLUSION 

Sonix looks very unsophisticated by 
today's standards, and its lack of 
support for tied or luplet notes is an 
absolute killer for serious musicians. 
For beginners or those on a budget it 
may prove more useful as it's very 

^— ^easy to get along with. 

(**^S) Compatible: Any Amiga 




» 



105 



CENTRAL UCENCEWAflE REGISTER 



CLR 



EDUCATIONAL 

ACHOHD (£3.50) 

Guiier crumd takir 
T.A.U.I. (E3.50) 

QC&E maths bulur 

NIGHT SKY (£3.50) 

A niiisl kir ill ilai jiiLACTi 

WORDS & LADDERS (C3.5Q) 

% . iki's .% luiLlur- vpK'Nin^ uji'iil- 

BASIC ALLV AMIGA (£4.99) 

■V mii I'll I'M nr?H Amiga un'iiciw 

LETS LEARN (£3,50) 

VnrioiM pinsgs kir3-7 yini nUK 

ALPHABET TEACH |E3.S0> 

rirfiit far yuunu kWi 
FAST FRET (£3.50) 

I ii.iMi Kilex lulnr 

WORK & PLAY (£3.50) 

Spelling made fan 

PLAV IT SAFE (£3.50) 

TcjkIi kidi ihnui MRQ in Lht home 
BIG TOP FUN (£3 .30) 
4 circus tolled £dn\e h. 
JlGMAMlA|'L3 5r>) 

JiK^i^ ptlZ?lc fj.inuL.'urEukir 

CHESS TEACHER (£3,50) 

A beei nrterc tiuile 

MIND VOUFt LANGUAGE (C3.50) 

\ ! T ..hiil.ii', . i ,r--i- 

SPEED READING (£4.99) 

In :i !■■.!■ vi .ii nuudinji stills 

CHORD COACH (£3.50) 

Pia&o choffd cuonr 

CA.T.T. (£4.50) 

Unl* k ih* mytlenei <rf the Tjiul 
FUN WITH CUBBY (£3.50) 
H bJuLaiionaJ yww-i (NOT ASCHIf 
PREHISTORIC FUN PACK (£3.50) 

4ixLetli:nl Dinmauriunw* 

PEG A PICTURE (£3.50) 

Lis! like Nil i'Iii liberie j2JfTlt 
UNDERSTANDING AMOS (£4.50) 

Ifam J.II ahual "BuK" 

SNAP (£3.50) 

'\\ il.ll kids "lil|\S 

MY UTTLE ARTIST (£3.50) 

final pmsnun-i iPsmL A5U0l 

BO RE A LIS JUNIOR (E3.50) 

I ii.i 1 .. I f u.T. : . . Cut klU-.. 

COMPOSITION (E3.50)and 
PORTRAITURE (3.50) 

PhnlnErupliK' LuLun-dK 

AMOS LANGUAGE QUIZ (£3.50) 
FUN WITH CUBBY 1 (£3.50) 

INOT AS<KJi 7 viral jMlliei for ki*< 

SEA SENSE (£3.50) 

A ■,L. , ;iniurv,hifi I jI>ji:.J 

ROCKET MATHS (M.5D) 

E-AL-yllL-n: k.id* M-Hht IMfW 

DRAFT V2 (£4.50) 

Culdtli \\k mysteries ofRuiKsiranes 

CLR 
ENCYCLOPEDIAS 

111* Tallowing dkk h:i„-,l 

t-nt^irhifwduis [-Dtrar a ntn^v (ft 

-r-i-Klilli! -..ilijul-v I tinj' .1 

mmhlnilHitn ai t»l,<lia|traaiH. 

draw inni & nh"rnerHl*< wh tUlt i.v 

miuriiimiii^ n wdl ii ttlucattaniL 

DINOSAURS 2 «A 50) 

DINOSAURS J (£4 99) 

GEOLOGY (S4.5d) 

SCH-AR SYSTEM 1 (£4.99) 

SOLAR SYSTEM 2 (£4.99) 

FRESHWATER FISHING (£4.991 

ECOLOGY (£4 99) 

MESSERSCHMIT BF109 (£4.99] 

SPITFIRE (E4 50) 

YOUR FIRST POMY (£4.50) 

BASIC HUMAN ANATOMY (£3.60} 

KINGS ANO QUEENS <E4 50) 

HOMF INVENTIONS (£4.50) 

DISCOVERY CNF AMERICA (£3.50) 

CD ROMS 

If1 .DO PIP) 
CDPD 1- EllSS 

FRED FISH 1 lo660ETt. 
CDPD 2 ■ £19,95 

SCOPE , JAM S MORE FISH ETC 
CDPD 3 -E19.95 

FISH 761 JJOO. ABA HAM ■'» PICS. IFF 

CLIP ART. CLASSIC- BOOKS *ts 

17 BIT PD - £38.94 

AM INSTANT PO LIBFIARV ON THIS 

BRILLIANT 2 DISK COLLECTION 



we stock 

F REP FISH 

1 -910 + 

(Fish Cat Disk £1,50) 



#SEASOFT'* 



The Logical Choice 



OetaMED Pre VSe - £30.00 

Latest 2 disk version o1 this famous tractor/sequencer- 
PULL DOWN MENUS, ON-LINE HELP, FULL MIDI SUPPORT WITH UP TO 64 TRACKS, 

SAMPLE EDITOR, SYNTHESiSED SOUND EDITOR, STANDARD TRACKER OR 
TRADITIONAL STAVE NOTATION DISPLAY, etc, etc, - (Requires Kickstart 2,04 or later) 
V4 NOW ONLY £18.00 ■ V4 Manual £8.50 - V4 & Manual £26.00 



AM/FM 

disk magazine lor (he 

serious Amiga musician 
Issue 16 out now 

£2.50 

I issues 1 to 14 b.sq available) 



AMFC Pro 

Converts many 

standard music files to 

OetaMED & Music-X 

format 

£10.00 



TOTAL 

mmUHct 

MED User Group (MUG) 
disk magazine 

Issue 4 now available 

£3.00 (2 disks) 

issues 1-3 E1.50 each 



AM/FM 
SAMPLES 

16oi5*s pa&i*d w " 
quality samptos 

£2.50 per disk 



ACC 

AMIGA CODERS CLUB 

tiinls, lips, tutorials 6 scares 

codes lor assembly' 

language pn?gr3.mmars 

£3.50 per issue 

(issue 31 now available) 



ACC HARDWARE 
PROGRAMMERS MANUAL 

nliol reading [or anyone Hying to come to grip-.. 
r ,bly language programming: on Ihe Art?w§a. Easy to- 
. Utonal m1t1 loads Of enemplea lor you 10 tr^ mWi 
the built-iM ErJitOf and Assembler 

Disk 1 (PO) 11.50 
Disks Z.3 & A £5,00 each (£12.50 for tlw 3) 



C-MAHQAl 

12 disks packed wilh 

all you need lo know 

about C programming 

on the Amiga 

£12.00 



A4EHE V4J8 

Latest version of itiis 

classic genealogical 
dalabase 

£15.00 



TECHHOSOUHP 

SAMPLER 

£29 95 

KM INTERFACE 

with leads 
£22.50 



ALPHA DATA 
MOUSf 

400 dpi ULTRA HIGH 
RESOLUTION 

£14.95 



SUPERSOUND 4 

Ihis brilliant feature 

packed Sample edhor is 

now available form 

£4.99 

(manual £10.99) 



"IMS TO AM* OTiH 

STOMffiS 



AMIGA P.Q. 8, SHAREWARE • IMAl STOCKING FIU£RS 



PD/SHAREWARE PRICES - PER DISK 

(No. of disks shown I n brackets) 

1 - 4 disks - E1.5C, 5 - 9 disks ■ £1 .25, 10 - 24 disks - £105, 25+ disks - C0.90 

Unless stated all titles work on A500(1 meg), A500+. A600 4 A1200 



UTILITIES 

A-BASEMl 

EindeM Jalrfiat piopua 

AMIGA FOX vi m 

Qcsl i" "P |:<jhhsli!ii^ prugfUV 

ASTRO 22 V3|1| 

H B i^ii i ■!■•■>;>■ pni|}Tiiii 

ACC 1-4(1) 

ttn at Imibs a.C.C. I 4 

d-copv va (i>. 

Ivri llinni disk ■riipying [miiiaiii 
EASY CALC M> 

KrCR1.3(l) 

nnw visj Liiri nui nDB anprw 

AN^l LWji ■> i'in yi^iir re* A 1 2CMI 
KICKSTART 2(1) 
ririuuic-n Kkbin - i«i A^H) 
MES£TStD2(1) 
Aung*- PC file cnn^^rlnr 
NCOMMVS(I) 
p:i'tLrlul mm pKKBgt 

NORTH C(!) 

r-t'nni(iilLr 

NUMPAO (1) 

ihitk a numeric kevp*d Hum AtiOO 

PC TASK V2 (1) 

ih no hi' m Hi-si PL eimiLwor 

SI&2I1) 

^nniprehrnsi^x: tluLLUh"- tiulny 

TEXT ENGINE V4.1 (1) 
cjutllenc tesr ediinrfw'iiif 
prices. --"I 

V4IOHPHm 

f irjce MTKHilFi niun*! artl iVaipt 



WU5/C 



GAMES 



BASS SOUNDS (1) 
:nuh ihi.iIiIi H.i\> -^iimplc-, 
CHRISTMAS MUSIC (11 

classic ChnsJBUii luin;--. 

ELECTBONIC MUSIC (3) 

^wiii-irclli'nv.ii' :i.:i-M.i ij JcivlsI 

DftUM KIT (2) 

li-j; i L,,ia i'v Diijii" *-' ii.ili'-. 

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Music 



AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE 94 



BARS & PIPES 
PROFESSIONAL 2.0 



Music Composition Software 



£299.99 - MERIDIAN 
DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 






F lut* 

Obo« 

C Ur tost 

O-i >. ■. > 

Frenrh I 

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T i wp a i ■ i 
Vinl in 
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Track H 
Track 15 




15^1 O i&O C : 



flsrs 4 Pipes uaea ■ grippal •pp*oach lo MIDI ittvtt thai helps you to ralil» \> lh* now o( Information iruurtd Ihe computer. 



(Wren /f comes to MIDI 
sequencing, they don't 
come more professional 
or more expensive than 
Blue Ribbon's Bars & 
Pipes Professional 2. 
Find out if it's worth the 
money... 



Although the Atari ST is tradi- 
tionally thought of as THE 
home MIDI computer, two 
Amiga packages helped to 
show the world that the Amiga was 
more than a match tor the besl thai 
the ST had to offer. The first of those 
was DR Ts KCS, and the second 
was Bars & Pipes. 

In its second version, the program 
grows from being a very good 
sequencer to an entire multimedia tool, 
as at home oontrotling video equipment 
as it is controlling musical instruments. 



TO THE 



B&P is what I call a "concept program'. 
What I mean by thai is that it 
approaches its objectives from the 
user's viewpoint, and achieves them in 
rather unusual ways, To get the best 
out of the program, you need to first 
understand the concept behind it. In 
this case the concept is to liken music 
production to water flowing through a 



plumbing system. The water enters at 
one end ol the system, waits around in 
the tank for a white , then Bows out of 
the other end, rf you add dye lo the 
water where ft enters the sysiem, the 
entire system changes to the new 
colour. If you add dye to the water 
flowing out ol the system, only that 
waier becomes changed. 

Now consider that the instrument 
is at one end of the system, the com- 
puter is in the middle and the sound 
module is at the output end, If you 
start playing the instrument Ihe musi- 
cal events start flowing around the 
system, if you choose to perform an 
effect to the input end of the system, 
the changes become permanent and 
actually affects the data in the com- 
puter's memory, whereas Ihe same 
effect applied at the output end 
merely modifies what is sent to the 
sound module, leaving the contents 
of RAM unchanged. 

The program will lei you play in 
real time on any of its tracks, and this 
is really what the program's been 
designed for. Still, it's very satisfying 
lo see that it includes an extremely 
comprehensive notation editor so 
that those of us who a rent fortunate 
enough to play an instrument can 
create music one note at a time. 

You can see up to 16 tracks on 
screen at a time using the song window, 
and these tracks are displayed in a kind 
ol condensed view preview mode. 

Running down the side of this pre- 
view screen are a bunch of icons 
which give you access to features 
such as the Mix Maestro where you 
can alter volume and pan settings in 



real-time, and the Tempo map where 

you can simply "draw' the tempo for 
the different parts of a song, 

BiSPalso contains comprehensive 
editing options, although many of the 
traditional options are made redun- 
dant by the power of some tools. For 
example, there's no need to physi- 
cally transpose parts ol your music 
when you can simply add an output 
tool which does the same job for you, 

Supplied with this version are a 
large number ol tools and these are 
the things which are applied to your 
music at various stages to modify the 
way it sounds. For instance, there's a 
tool which makes all notes on a 
channel echo, whilst another one 
duplicates the notes onto another 
channel entirely. 



Once you learn how to use it, B&f$ 
& Pipes is the undisputed regent ol 
Amiga sequencers, Trouble is, it's 
juil so darned feature packed that 
even after a year I'm still con- 
stantly discovering new things. If 
youcant afford it, sell your 
Grandmother, then buy it! 

Compatibility: 2MbRAM_ 
and Kickstart 1 ,3 or 
higher. 



Have You 
Considered*,.? 

BARS & PIPES TOOLKITS 

£34.95-49.95 - MERIDIAN 
DISTRIBUTION ■ 0B1 543 3500 



Powerful as the program may lie, you 
can make fljrt A Pipes inn better with 
optional toolkits. 

Each kit contain* a selection of tools 
which can be used al either end of (lis 
'pips', input or output. Alternatively Ihey 
can be looliied ' a nd us Ed lo ed it music 
via Ihe notation edilor. There are cur- 
rently eight kits available, although a lot 
of Ihe earlier tools were given away free 
with version 2 ol the urogram. 

Hie latest additions In the sel are Ihe 
Performance and Power Tool Kits, As 
the name son Heals, the Performance kit 
Is designed for musicians who use Bats 
& Pipes is pari o' a live performance. It 
includes options such as ForceKey 
which makes all played notes conform 
to 3 selected musical key and 
ForceChord which turns all played notes 
into chords. II also contains a great 
number ol options designed to smooth 
and simplify many ol Ihe controls thai 
need lo he made quickly during a ner- 
lormance. The Power Tools are aimed 
at studio musicians and include options 
such as Guitar String Filter which is 
used to lilter any guitar notes played on 
a certain siring between specified Irets. 
Another intriguing option is Swing which 
changes ihe parameters of your music 
to 'humanise' il, 

Each of the kils contains 21 additional 
tools which are guaranteed to make your 
MIDI lite even easier. 

Com pati hie : Any Amiga fflPSK 
capable ol running flare al \J^fp 
Pipes 




187 



^^^™ *^^^^ma*^^m*^A 




Music 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



SUPERJAM! 



£99.95 - MERIDIAN DISTRIBUTION - 081 543 3500 



jpfrJfln ! I Ktuftflird I Sort*) * 



%\ »CC««»ftMMl H1PIE I FP*f * i ' -JJ 




So what if you're a 
talentless doodler whose 
best musical efforts 
sound like a cat in a 
washing machine?! 
There's always 
SuperJAM! 



SuperJAM! is a great program 
for composing music. When I 
say thai, I mean lhat it does 
the composing, worrying 
about what notes are in key, and 
which chords can be used, all you 
have to do is tell it what you want. 

The program is supplied with a selec- 
tor of musicaj styles and many more are 
avaiable. Tie ones supplied with the pro- 
gram attempt to cover the generic styles 
such as house, rock, jazz, soul etc. 

The program can be used as a 
real-time composition tool, Of you can 
choreograph your lunes and record 
them for future reference, In real-time 



mode, simply choose tfie style you 
want, and tell SuperJAM' to begin 
playing. II will play a repeating loop Of 
music in the chosen style using sound 
samples or MIDI. This loop can vary in 
duration, but is usually less than 20 
seconds long. However, whilst |he 
loop is playing you can alter its key 
and pitch by clicking the keys of a mini 
piano at the bottom ol the screen. 
Some ot these keys will change the 
tune's scale from major to minor, or 
one ol over a dozen more complex 
scales (diminished, etc). There are 
also feur varialion buttons which can 
be used to trigger different versions of 












MUSIC X 



£129.99 - SOFTWARE BUSINESS - 0480 496497 




Before the arrival ol pro packages such ais KCS 
and Bars & Pipes, one program stood alone lo 
demonstrate lhat the Amiga was a viable MIDI 
controller. Surprisingly, four years later Music 
X still looks quite tempting, The program attempts to be 
all things to all men and consequently is rather a jum- 
ble ol hidden screens and complicated options. This 
wouldn't be so bad il it weren't for the fact that the pro- 
gram has now hit bargain basement prices making il 
ideal for beginners. 

EASY EDIT 

Music X defaults to a sequencer screen where you can 
see an overview of the different parts of your song. At 
the top of this window are video style controls which 
you can use to record new tracks, or listen to those 
that you've already created, If you select a song sec- 
lion and then click the Edil button, you'll be laken to 
the bar edilor. This is similar to Sequencer f s step 
time editor only much more powerlul and far easier to 
use. As usual,, notes are represented as bars of vary- 
ing lengths indicating their duration. However, velocity 
■[volume) is represented numerically and you can also 
specify program and control change messages as well 
as many other factors from this screen. 



The interesting thing about B is the lact (hat all of 

the instruments are represented, each using a different 
colour. This makes it far easier to identity and dupli- 
cate patterns in your music, 

If you are a bit of a purist, you can edit notes in a 
, list format which is similar to, but much more compre- 
hensive than, those used by tracker programs, 

Music X also comes with a patch editor and com- 
prehensive sample handling leatures . 

CONCLUSION 

Despite its age. Music X really is quite a good program 
and is more than capable ol handling commercial stan- 
dard compositions. It isn't as feature packed as its 
modern day relatives, but ihen it only costs a fraction 
ol the price. Well worth checking oul if you ( 
can't afford Bars & Pipes 




the same tune, perhaps with more or 
less instrumentalists, or even an entirety 
different but complimentary tune. In 
addition to the vanations a further set of 
buttons allow you to trigger beginnings, 
endings, breaks and fills; the latter two 
are simply musical techniques for mov- 
ing from one part of a tune to another. 
All of the buttons can be triggered in 
real-time, as can the scale keys. There 
are even additional computer keyboard 
options for performing more compli- 
cated musical transitions. 

When 'you start to understand the 
way lhat the program works, you can 
record your compositions in the step 
time editor. This presents you with a 
grid representing your tune. The grid 
is divided into bars which are subdi- 
vided into blocks. At the start of each 
block you can specify a musical event, 
such as a key shift, variation start, fill, 
etc Thai means that whenever you 
play the tune from the start, il will 
always repeat exactly the same 
sequence of events. Now whilst this 
may seem limiting, the examples pro- 
vided demonstrate how with skill and 
care you can create tunes which are 
of professional quality. 

Once you've created a tune, it can 
be saved in the program's own format 
lor later editing, or as a standafd MIDI 
file for loading into any other package 
thai supports them. 

CONCLUSION 

If you own Bars & Pipes, the Iwo pro- 
grams can be linked logether so that 
SuperJAM! will lay down backing 
tracks for your original compositions. 
In fact, this was what the program was 
originally designed lor, although it is 
great tun as a stand alone tool loo. If 
you're a wannabe musician, now at 
last you can create original work of 
your very own I 

Compatibility: Kickstart 1.3 and 
1Mb RAM, but performance improves 
drastically with more RAM 
and a faster processor. 



TAUNTED PROGRAMMER 

Music Xms written by a character 
calling himself Talin. Talin was chris- 
tened Richard Joiner hut presumably 
became 3ll mystic after the incredible 
success of bis first Amiga program, 
Fae/y Tats Adventure. Several of tbe 
lunes from thai game have been 
included in the Mink JT package as 
examples,. 

Talin went an la even greater fame 
switching allegiances Irum 
Micro illusions \MuskXs publishers) 
to Electronic Arts, wherE his ifiosl 
recent project was Deluie Musis 
Construction Kit 2. 



» 



iaa 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Music 



Choosing A Midi Instrument 



So you've bought a 
wonderful sequencing 
package and you've 
spent a while using it 
with sound samples, 
chances are you're now 
ready to move up a step 
and add a real 
instrument. Why? Well 
three main reasons: the 
first is that most MIDI 
instruments allow you to 
replay more notes at 
once than the Amiga can 
generate internally. 
Typically a MM 
instrument can play at 
least eight sounds 
simultaneously although 
many can play 18 or 
even 32. The maximum 
number of notes that an 
instrument can play is 
known as its polyphony. 
Whilst the number of 
different instruments it 
can play (up to a 
maximum of 16) is 
known as its timhratity. 



The second reason for buying 
a real instrument is the qual- 
ity of the sounds it can 
generate. Unless you own 
an expensive \ 6-bit sound sampler, 
the Amiga can replay 8-bit sound 
samples, This means that the quality 
of the sound is relatively limited. 
Most modem electronic instruments 
uses sounds sampled at 1Gbit reso- 
lution or higher, 

The final reason to buy a MIDI 



instrument, if you can play one, is 
because you can enter music by 
playing the instrument directly., using 
the Amiga like a programmable tape 
recorder and mixing desk combined. 

So. you've decided to buy an 
instrument, what should you look out 
for? There is one more thing to 
decide before you start looking; do 
you want a synth module or a proper 
playable instrument? A synth mod- 
ule is simply a small MIDI compatible 
box, and is suited to people who 
don't play an instrument, or who 
already own a MIDI compatible 
instrument, You can think of a synth 
module as a bo« full of samples 
which can be played from your 
Amiga. It has iwo advantages over 
full instrument: it's usually cheaper 
than a version with a keyboard, and 
it's very small so it's lar more conve- 
nient because it can simply stand 
out of sight at the back of your desk. 
Now that you know what type of 
instrument you want, and you hope- 
fully hatf e some idea ot the price you 
want to pay, you can trot ofi to your 
local music shop to buy your instru- 
ment 




Different instruments come with 
different features, but the most 
important to a MIDI user will be the 
number and quality of the sounds, 
and how easily ihey can be manipu- 



lated, If you're buying a full instru- 
ment as opposed to a sound 
module, features such as keyboard 
response and after touch will also be 
important. 



PRO MIDI 
INTERFACE 

Before you even think of connecting a MIDI 
instrument, you're going to need some sort oi 
interface to link it to your computer. The Pro 
MIDI is an option that allows for growth. 
The interface itself is a wedge shaped lump of plas- 
tic five inches deep by lour and a hall wide. The unit s 
manufacturers. Microdeal, describe it as being 'an 
attractive wedge shape' which is P.F. speak for saying, 
-It's a bloody horrible shape but what could we do?'. At 
the wide end of the wedge there are four MIDI sockets 
two outs, one in and a thru. The whole 
unit plugs into the serial port of your 
Amiga via a flat 1 6 inch ribbon cable 
which can be easily slipped underneath 
any other equipment you may have on 
your desk. 

Once connected it's simply a matter ot 
plugging in your MIDI cables and away 
you go I 

Incidentally, the package also comes 
with a free disk lull of public domain MIDI 
software. Among Ihe more interesting 
titles is Algo Rhythms, an algorithmic ^ 
music composition tool - or put in plain 
English it composes music for uses math- 
ematical formulas. Sometimes the results 
can be wonderful, at other times they can 



bepainlultolistento! 

There's also another program by the same author 

called SMUSM1DI. As its name suggests, the program 
converts SWIUS tiles into standard MIDI format ones. 
This is particularly exciting because used in conjunc- 
tion witb AMFC (reviewed earlier) it means that you 
can now convert every single Amiga music format to 
MIDI standard so that your liles can be used in proles 
sional sequencing environments or can be swapped, 
with other MIDI users on oiher computers. 

CONCLUSION 

The Pro MIDI works as expected and is reasonably 
priced. Charges are, you'll only ever use the in and 
one out port, but the existence ol the olhers means 
thai there's room for you to add another stand alone 
MIDI device if you get one. The extra disk of utilities is 
a real bonus and some of them are great ^^, 
tun. Good value. 







170 




^^^tm 




Your 



eces Together 



A 




Puzzled about music and the Amiga? 
Look to us for the answers! 
ml At The Blue Ribbon SoundWorks 
we've developed a strong lineup of 
talent. Each of our products receives 
the special care it takes to produce 
winner. That's why you'll find a Blue 
Ribbon ou every box! 

Take SupcrJAM! Wictfth 

automatic 
copyright 
free com- 
poser 
be writing the 
next hit senior creating the perfect 
soundtrack for your video production 
in no time. Super] AM! comes with over 
30 different musical styles and a backup 
band that performs beautifully, whether 
it's Mozart or Motown. And with the 
Extras Disks for Super J AM!, you can 
instantly increase your repertoire 
with styles like Fusioni.sl, Funkjungk, 
Rachmaninoff and Rtickapeggio. £99,95 

Our One-Stop Music Shop turns 
your Amiga Into a powerful music 
machine I This hardware -software 
combination includes all you need to 
get 16-bit stereo multi-timbral audio 
for an incredible price! £569,95 

When you're ready for multi-track 
recording, automated mixing, notation 
printing and 
state-of-the- 
art MIDI 
sequencing, 
you're ready 

for Bars&Pipes Professional. Special 
effects, multi-media syne, sophisticated 




To get organized, grab The 
PatchMeister, our graphical, uni- 



BARS&PIPES 



PROFESSION 



Please send me details of the Blue Ribbon Range: 



Name 

Address , 




■ *** + i) f |4f + +4M f ■ + + + * < * ■ »+* i 't*44 ■ ^ H+ + H ( i f M 



Town .,.,.. „.„,....„ Postcode.. 

Return lo: 1605 Chanlilly Drive, 
Smeel 200, Atlanta, 
Georgia 32334 




harmonies, non-destructive editing, 
and an unlimited number of tracks for 
recording only begin to describe it. 
Plus, you can integrate it seamlessly 
with SupcrJAM! £299.95 

If you're into MIDI but don't need 
full power, check out Bars&Pipes, music 
software made simple. Bars&Pii-es 
features multi-track recording) graphi 
cal editing, tempo mapping and r 
BaRS&Piphs is expandable, so it grows 
as you do. 

Once the music is fl 
ing> pick and choose from 
Bars&Piptk Add-on Series. 
These packages make 
BAks&PfPhN or Bars&Pipes 
Professions even more fun to own. 
Use the Creativity Kit to Invent 
fresh musical ideas, or the Pro Studio 
Kit for complete control of your MIDI 
studio. The Internal Sounds Kit elimi- 
nates the need for MIDI altogether. 
Imagine, multi-track recording inside 
your computer! To round it off, we pre 
sent Rules for Tools, docu menial ion 
and C source code for writing your 
own musical features. 



A L 
i 




irk 



A, 



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versally-configurflble MIDI 
patch librarian. It 
comes with r* 1 

dozens of M \X>\ 
drivers and 
templates. Don't 
see what you want? 
Make it yourself with the special drivei 
creation feature. And, The PatchMeiste 
integrates easily into Bars&Pipes 
Profession-.^, for the ultimate compo- 
sition environment. £79.95 

Want to triple the capacity of vouj 
Dl studio? Use Triple Play Plus^ out 
MIDI interface that \ p ~ 

includes 3 sepa- Nyj^ffeiv^' 

ratcly- addressable ^/m Ew^ 

MIDI outs for 48 
simultaneous MIDI 
channel s. O f cou r se, jr*~— n c, 
we designed it especial- "tl! ^ 
ly for our software. No compatibility 
problems here. £169.95 

Synchronizing with video and 
audio tape is simple with SyncPro* oui 
universal SMPTE 
synchronization 
box for audio, 
video and multi- 
media production, 
Yes, it comes with 
special Blue 
ibbon software and works with any 
rniga application that supports MIDI 
prime-tode. £189.95 

The Blue Ribbon SoundWorks. 
When it comes to quality, we don*t 
miss a beatf 





SyncPro 



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blue Ribbon 
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AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Musi 



Choosing a MIDI Instrument 

ROLAND SOUND CANVAS 
SC-55 MK2 

£649.28 - HOLLAND MUSIC - 0892 511501 



If money's no object, 
and you want a synth 
module that's good 
enough to create a 
movie score with, 
Roland's Sound Canvas 
is a dream come true. 



It's a musical powerhouse which 
comes in a stylish case approxi- 
mately 9x9x2 inches in size. That 
means it's small enough to fit onto 
the most cluttered desk, or alterna- 
tively it can be incorporated into a 
half sized rack mount. 

It can play 1 S different instru- 
ments at a time, and has a 28 note 



HB 



polyphony. However, some of the 
instruments (voices) are constructed 
by combining two other ones (known 
as parties). If your musk: uses a lot 
of these 'combination' sounds, I he 
maximum polyphony could be con- 
siderably less than the quoted tigure. 
Fortunately, the voices which use 
two partials tend to be the more 




BOSS DR SYNTH 

£449 - HOLLAND MUSIC - 0892 511501 



The little brother to ihe Sound 
Canvas. Boss are actually a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Roland and 
the Dr Synth is essentially a Sound 
Canvas in a cheaper box, it fea- 
tures the same level of polyphony 
and is still 16 part rnulli-timbral. 
The unit is supplied in a small 
desk-top case with an LCD display and masses of switches, buttons and 
dials. Considering] the fact that this is the cheaper of the two modules, it's 
surprising lo See thai the Or Synth actually has considerably more buttons, 
allowing you much taster changing ol essential parameters, and this 
makes it ideal lor live performance work. 

Although it is still GS/GM compatible, it only has 156 tones and eight 
drum sets. Still, these are likely to keep you going for a good while. The 
missing instruments include all Of the sound effects, and the MT-32 instru- 
ments as welli as many ol the obscure alternative sounds, 

CONCLUSION 

A great mid-priced tone bank that's well worth taking a look at. 
Requires a MIDI Interface. 



obscure ones like 
shakuhachis, 5th 
saw waves, ice 
rain and reverse 
cymbals. 
Everyday music 
doesn't use these 
sounds much, SO 
unless you're 
being extremely 
creative you're 
unlikely lo ever 
notice the restric- 
tion on polyphony. 
It includes an 
LCD display which shows Ihe vol- 
ume of all sixteen channels as well 
as the velocity at which each instru- 
ment is playing. It includes switches 
to control stereo pan, reverts, chorus, 
key shift, MIDI channel, part and 
instrument. 

The Sound Canvas is responsive 
to the full range of MIDI control 
changes so you Cain modulate and 
pitch bend notes. You can also 
specify after-touch and stereo pan. 

Although it is GS/GM compatible, 
it's ironic that although it was Roland 
themselves who designed and insti- 
gated the GS standard., the SC-55's 
use of partials actually means lhat it 
doesn't fully comply as far as 
polyphony Is concerned. It boasts 
354 top quality instruments including 
a selection ol sound effects ranging 
Irom streams, birds and the sound of 
the seashore, to guns, telephones 
and helicopters. It also includes ten 
drum sets from bassy house kits, lo 
light jazz and orchestral sets. For 
compatibility with earlier synths, the 
Sound Canvas also has MT-32 and 
CM-S4 instrument sets. 

CONCLUSION 

The SC-5-5 is an absolute delight to 
use. The sounds are very nice, 
although not quite as rich as those 
on the TG100. Its informative LCD 
display is so useful when dealing 
with the complexities of MIDI, and 
really helped me whilsl I was learn- 
ing, I've owned mine for over a year, 
and I've never regretted it ^^^ 
fo r a nanosecond I £j-lj^ 

Requires a MIDI Interface. >^#H 



DREAM 
GMX-1 

Approximately 
£250 - B.E.M. 
071 733 6821 




If you're on a really tight budget, 
you can still enjoy the pleasures 
of multi timbral MIDI with this 111- 
tie dynamo from France. 

The unit is extremely basic 
looking, consisting of a cream 
coloured plastic box with a vol- 
ume slider, power swiich and 
headphone socket on the front. 
At the back you'll find MIDI In, out 
and Thru ports, a power socket, 
stereo phone plugs and an RS232 
socket- The latter can be used to 
connect the unit directly lo your 
computer without using a MIDI 
interface. 

The unit is fully GM compati- 
ble, which means that it contains 
128 GM-mapped Instruments. It 
also has several drumkits, one of 
which is MT-32 compatible. 

Although the unit Is very basic 
looking, internally it still 
responds to all Ihe MIDI mes- 
sages (such as polyphonic 
aflertouch and pitch bend) that 
the expensive systems do. 
Without some sort of display it's 
very tricky tor beginners to 
understand exactly what s hap- 
pening when things start to go 
wrong, 

CONCLUSION 

On a power to price ratio, the 
GMX-1 Is totally unrivalled. Sure, 
the Dr Synth and Sound Canvas 
look nicer and perform better, but 
for the extra hundreds they 
damned well should! If you gel 
flustered easily, the GMX might 
not be the best choice it you're 
totally new to the whole business. 
However, if you have a bit of 
patience then you'll certainly find 
this module to be one of the 
music world's undiscovered jew- 
No MIDI Interface \^^fa 
required. 






172 




AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



YAMAHA TG1 00 

£399 - HOLLAND MUSIC - 0892 511501 



If you're more 
concerned about the 
quality of your sounds 
than the quantity, the 
TGWQ is good priced 
option. Check this 
baby out! 




Designed surely as a direcl 
rival tor the Sour>d Canvas. 
Ihe TG100 is Yamaha's top 
selling GM compatible synth 
module. It is of course 16 part multi- 
lirnbral and 2B not© polyphonic, 
however it only contains 1 §2 voices 
compared to the Canvas' 350. What 
mates the TGi DO special is the qual- 
ity olihose voices; not that they've 
been sampled at a better rale or any- 
thing like that; it's just the sounds are 
so rich and lull that ihey have a reso- 
nance that Roiand's modules can't 



hops to match. This makes the 
TG100 perfect for modem dance 
music where a more substantial 
sound is the norm. 

True, yuu could beef up the 
Canvas' sounds using reverb and 
even chorus, but why bother when 
Yamaha's offering provides the 
sonority that many composers seek. 
Nowhere is this more evident than 
its stringed instruments. Traditionally 
these are the hardest sounds to give 
body to, but not on this module. 

It comes as a table top unit 



slightly smaller than ihe SC-55 and it 
has a single line LCD display - better 
than nothing, but only just. 

CONCLUSION 

The TG1 00 is very much a matter of 
personal lasts. True it doesn't have 
the same impressive specifications 

that the Sound Canvas has, but it 
does sound great for certain styles ot 
music, and it's almost half the price 
100. Try both before you buy. Highly 
recommended. 



YAMAHA PSR 300 

£329.99 - HOLLAND MUSIC - 0892 511501 

Y< 
I 



r amah a used lo produce a good range of 

cheap MIDI keyboards but apparently the 
MIDI implementation was rather flaky, so the 
Cheap stuff was binned, leaving the PSR 300 
at ihe bottom of the range. It's the cheapest 'serious' 
MIDI keyboard I could find, and it has some nice lea- 
tores. 

It has 28 voice polyphony and is 16 part multi- 
timbral, yet strangely it's not GS/GM compatible. It 
includes 1 DP voices which, like the TG100, have 
I hat distinctive Yamaha (eel to 
them. Some people call it muffled 
bul I think that rich is a better 
description. 

The PSR includes a 61 key key- 
board with full size, touch sensitive 
keys. It's very much a player's 
instrument as well as a program- 
mer's. For starters it comes with 50 
auto accompanimenl styles which 
can be used to play along whilst 
you bang away at the keys. It also 
Includes the option to split Ihe key- 
board so that one part plays one 
instrument whilst another uses a 
different one. 



CONCLUSION 

If Yamaha had mapped Ihe instruments lo conform 
with ihe General MIDI standard this would be an abso- 
lutely unbeatable bargain. As it is, the PSR300 is still 
great ton and ideal lor the MIDI user who wants to 
practice his keyboard skills as well as his computer tal 
ents. A good sale entry point to Ihe world of MIDI 
keyboards. 







Strange Moves Afoot 

If you're observant you may have 
notified Itie fact thai there were abso- 
lutely leads of cheap MIDI keyboards 
available three or so years ago, yet 
now the entry level lor such a key- 
board is twice as expensive as it mu. 
There are many reasons tor this, one 
or the must important ol which is to do 
with where the instruments are manu- 
factured, 

Most of the big players in the game 
manufaclure their instruments in 
Japan, then export them lo us here in 
Europe, Al Ihe momenl the Japanese 
currency market is Incredibly strong, 
and over ihe lasl year alone the Yen 
{which is the currency ot Japan) has 
increased in value against European 
currency by mere Mian 4Q%. This 
means that it's eirtremely expensive lo 
buy train there at the momenl. 

Anolher reason tar the change is the 
overall hand in keyboard sales world- 
wide, The keyboard manufacturers da 
market research based on the world 
market rather lh an small parts erf It. 
This enables them to create instru- 
ments which will have Ihe best 
chances of success world-wide. 
Unfortunately, the European market, 
and Britain in particular, is much, 
much more techno logica I ly aware, 
and has a greater percentage of MIDI 
users than the rest of the world. This 
means ihai we suffer because key- 
boards are designed for Ihe lawesl 
common denominator rather than our 
specilic regukremenis. It was thanks to 
this fad that low end MIDI devices and 
Mini keyboards have all but disap- 
peared horn the European market. 

One linaJ laclor which has had a 
massive unpad, has been Ehe growth 
Of lire computer entertainmenl indus- 
liy which in the words ol one official 
'Has had a devastating impact on 
sales of ulher entertain me il products 
over Ihe lasl two years'. This has 
meant that the home market manufac- 
turers have had to streamline their 
ranges, making every possible econ- 
omy in the process. 



» 



173 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



Music 




Choosing A Midi Instrument 



Miracle Piano Tutor 



£299.99 - MINDSCAPE - 0444 482545 



Just because feu can't 
afford the time for 
regular piano lessens 
doesn't mean that you 
can't learn to play an 
instrument The Miracle 
is ready to teach 
whenever you have time 
to learn! 



Science fiction has long been 
predicting a world in which 
robot and computers exist to 
do our every bidding from 
walking the dog to cleaning the 
house and cooking the dinner. 
Whilst such a world may be a few 
years away yet, Mindscape's Miracle 
keyboard tutor is a giant teap for- 
wards for home computers. 

Quite simply, the Miracle teaches 
you how to play 1he piano. It won't 
be easy, and you'll still need to put in 
regular practice but you won't be 
paying El a half hour for a stern 
faced piano teacher to show you 
how bad you are either* 



$mm 



UE 



The Miracle consists of two parts; 
the software and the keyboard- The 
keyboard is a lull sized 12B key MIDI 
compatible instrument with velocity 
sensitive keys and 1 2B instruments. 
In today's market it's worth more 
than the ashing price for the whole 
shebang, so you're on the right foot- 
ing already, It connects to the serial 
interface using a custom cable which 
avoids the need for an additional 
MIDI interface. 

The software, of course, is where 
the real power lies, after all, there 
are lots ol MIDI keyboards oul there. 
When it has loaded you'll be shown 
a number of rooms and Ihe one you 




choose will determine the activity 
you'll engage in. The most important 
of them is the classroom. 

In the classroom you'll be taught 
basic keyboard recognition and told 
how to position your hands and whal 
lingers 10 use for what keys. You'll 
then go on to play simple runs ot 
notes so that you begin to gain famil- 
iarity with the position of everything. 
After that timing skills will be intro- 
duced, making you play in time with 
a metronome or other beat. It's in 



this gradual layering ot skills that you 
develops, incorporating each 
recently learned skill into the subse- 
quent lessons so that the relevance 
is obvious, and the necessary prac- 
tice is gained, 



By far the most significant thing 
about the program is ihe way it 
responds to your efforts. Thanks to 
the MIDI link, it is able to monitor 



Have You Considered...? 

BLOOMSBURY DICTIONARY QF MUSIC 

As your knowledge of music increases, this book is Ihe perfect companion. Whilst it wort 
teach you haw Id play dr read music, If will help lo explain some ol Ihe terminology, as 
well a? providing entertaining reading ahoul a variety ol musical subjects. Topics conn-red 
range 'rein notation to mandolins, Ironv Steely Dan to Orchestral layouts, 

If n ol esse nlia I , |h ig ce rta i nly is a highly en joya hie reference work far anyone interested 
In music and everything In do with it. 



your every action, commenting upon 
your playing when necessary and 
giving you encouragement and guid- 
ance in an attentive and 
non-judgemental way that no human 
tutor could hope to match. 

The great thing about this method 
of teaching is the fact that the com- 
puter never misses an error, nor 
does its attention wander, nor does it 
forget whal you did last time. This 
means that each lesson can be pre- 
cisely tailored to your own strengths 
and weaknesses, ensuring that you 
get the greatest help where It's most 
needed. 

As a way of retaining your enthu- 
siasm; many of the lessons come in 
the form ol games where your profi- 
ciency in certain disciplines affects 
the outcome, 

The tutorials are arranged in 
lessons, and at the end of each one 
you'll be offered the opportunity lo 
play along with the 'orchestra'. The 
computer will play the backing band 
using a variety of instruments, and 
you are able lo put your newly 
acquired skills to use playing the lead 
tune. Surprisingly even the simplest 
tunes sound great when played in this 
lashion, and the ptey along is one of 
the program's great incentives, 

For younger students, successful 
completion of a lesson entitles them 
to receive a printed certificate pro- 
vided you have a printer of course! 

CONCLUSION 

Miracle was so good that it featured 
on Tomorrow's World. Although its 
well over a year old now, the tech- 
nology has not even been 

challenged, much less superceded. 
At £299 it may seem pncey 
(although compared to the price of a 
comparable MIDI keyboard it's not), 
but when you deduct the price Of 
piano lessons, especially for more 
than one student, you can see how 
(he cost can be recouped in less 
than six months. A very exciting 
idea, and certainly one of the 
Amiga's better develop- 
ments. 



££pi 



174 



U5IC 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 



CLARITY 1 6 

£149.95 - HISOFT - 0525 713671 



Samplers 



If you don't own a MIDI 
instrument the chances 
are that sooner or later 
you're going to want to 
record a sound and 
replay it through your 
Amiga. Why? Weft 
because you can of 
course! Also because no 
matter bow many sound 
samples you have 
available to you, you're 
hound to come across a 
sound or effect that you 
just have to include in 
your work, be it a piece 
of music, a demo or a 
game. 



Clarity 




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Strangely enough, Clarlly opana a variety ol windows dlfedly an ma Workbench screen. 



The good news is you can buy 
sound sampler s for the price of 
a game, and in the long fun 
they're going to be a tot more 
fun and a great deal mora rewarding. 
If you're serious about sampling, 
shouldn't you be looking at a device 
that offers CD quality sound and profes- 
sional sample mixing? If the answer to 
the above question is yes, but you only 
own an A500, 600 or 1 200, there's only 
one option, AVR's Clarity 16. 

When the Amiga was designed, it 
was given lite ability to play 8-bit sam- 
pled sounds. Considering thai CD 
players were not even commonplace- 
back then, the lad that the Amiga could 
play bach sound at .all was lairly impres- 



sive. Of course since then ihe digital 
revolution has redefined toe standards, 
and many people have come to see a- 
bit samples as simply not good enough. 
The reason tor this is that 6-bits repre- 
sents ihe resolution at which the sound 
can be recorded. A sound is basically 
an analogue signal, (hat is to say that 
electrically it's represented by an 
infinitely divisible waveform. To store a 
sound in. the computer's memory, it 
needs to be converted into a digital 
form To convert the smooth sine wave 
of an analogue waveform into a digital 
format, it has to be represented as a 
series ot 'steps'. The smaller the steps 
are, the more accurately they will be 
able to duplicate the original curved 



AMAS2 



£99.95 - HISOFT - 0525 713671 



II you want a sampler and you own a MIDI instrument, 
AMAS 2 is a good option for it combines a decent 
quality ti- t»i sampler with a MIDI interface. 

To be honest, I find it very hard to distinguish one 
cheap 8-bit sampler from another in terms of sound 
quality. That being Ihe case, one has to compare them 
in terms of hardware features. 

AMAS 2 comes in a wedge shaped box that plugs 
into the parallel and serial ports. The parallel pod Is for ■ 
the sampler whilst ihe serial is for the MIDI interface. 

The unit is provided with $t&r®Qmastf*r 2 software, 
which was also included with the cheap sampler of the 
same name. Nevertheless, it's not too bad. The most 
popular options are represented by easy to recognise 
icons and ihe screen is pleasant on the eyes, some- 
thing New Dimensions would do well to notice! 

The mpul level ol a sound can be software controlled 
which is a nice feature even Clarity 16 doesn't have, it 
basically means thai you can control the volume of an 
incoming sound without having to mess around with 
your hi-fi or whatever: very handy when sampling from 
equipment lhat provides fixed volume output. 

Samples can be recorded in mono at over 59KHz 




and the menus contain many additional features 
such as 3D display of samples, a spectrum analyser 
and the usual batch of special effects such as echos, 
reverb, etc. 

CONCLUSION 

AMAS 2 is ideal for the budding Amiga musician. 
Whilst it's not ihe best S-bit sampler in the world, its 
better than most, and the added MID! interface means 
that you won't have to splash out on a separate one. 
Pretty good. 

Compatible: Any Amiga with 1 meg RAM. 



sine wave. 

When you look at an eight oft sam- 
pler, the waveform is divided into a 
maximum of 256 vertical steps because 
this is the maximum value that can be 
stored in eight bits. By doubling the 
number of bits, you increase the num- 
ber of steps to 65,536, a 256 fold 
increase in sampJe resolution, and 
equivalent to the rate al which audio 
information is stored on a compact disc. 

The Clarity 16 samples at this rate 
which naturally means a significant 
increase in quality 

The unit connects to a computer via 
bolh the serial and parallel interlaces, 
and your sound source is attached to it 
via a pair ol phoneo sockets al ihe 
back, It's supplied with software which 
is very straight forward to use. H pro- 
vides a maximum mono sample rate of 
44KHz. and even stereo can be 
recorded al an impressive 33KMz. The 
software also includes a good selection 
ol editing and effects tools such as 
echos, distortions, flanging and rever- 
beration. You can also set the position 
of a sound if you're working in stereo. 

Once recorded, samples can be 
played via the Amiga, or via the car- 
tridge itself. Because Clarity also 
includes a built-in MIDI interface, you 
can actually assign various samples to 
different keys on a MIDI keyboard, 
using the keyboard as a trigger, per- 
haps in a live performance. In fact, for 
the lime being this is probably Ihe pro- 
gram's best use because no music 
sequencing, notation or tracker pro- 
grams support 16-bit samples yet. To 
try and combat this problem AVR have 
made the necessary bits of code avail- 
able to anyone who requests them. 

CONCLUSION 

Although Clarity 16 isn't as good as 
the Sunrize internal 1 6-bit samplers, 
it's ihe only option for owners of the 

smaller Amigas. 
Compatibility: Any Amiga 
with 1 meg RAM, 



» 



1TB 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



Sound Samplers 



MEGALOSOUND 

£34.95 - HISOFT - 0525 713671 




offer&d a maximum of 44,300, still 
very impressive. 

DIRECT TO DISK 

If you choose to sample direct to 
disk, the available space on the 
drive will be analysed, and you can 
then indicate how much of that you 
want occupied by the sample. II you 
have a lot ol memory, you can spec- 
ify a large RAM buffer for the sample 
to be recorded into. It's only as this 
buffer fills up, that the program will 
start to write to disk. 

The program also contains a great 
many special effects, mosl of which 
can either be applied to ihe sample in 
memory, or real-time to an incoming 
signal. These include flanging, modu- 
lation, metallic, bass and treble bgosl. 
brighten, vibrato, modulation, reverb, 
iremolo. chorus and many others. 



Although some of these effects are 
clearly included purely lor their enter- 
tainment value, many of them are 
very useful in a semi- pro erwinorv 
ment. especially for MCs. 

CONCLUSION 

Megalosound is v^fy friendly to use. 
and the user-interface is a delight 
which I felt assisted my enjoyment of 
the sampler, rather than acted as an 
obstacle to it. The hardware is ade- 
quately constructed, and the addition 
of an input level dial is a great bonus- 
Direct to disk recording makes il fea- 
sible to construct entire performances 
on a hard drive, and there are even a 
couple of replay programs included. 
This is undoubtedly Ihe best budget 
sampler of all lime' ^^^ 

Compatibility: Any £"Jt?fel 
Amiga with 1Mb RAM. X^JjP 



if you're short of 
memory, one option is a 
sampler which records 
direct to disk. 
Megafosound fits the 
biii perfectly. 



The budget sampler market 
has always been a hotly 
contested one, with the con- 
sumer coming out the winner 
as companies such as Microdeai, 
New Dimensions and Hombo slug- 
ging it Out, adding ever more 
features in the hope of taking your 
cash. Whilst the list of features has 
risen, the hardware quality has 
stayed very much the same, but now 
it seems as if Megalosound may 
have gained a slight advantage. 

CLEVER SOFTWARE 

The first thing that I noticed about 
the software is bow intelligent H 
seems to he, Because of the vast 
range of Amigas out there, it needs 
to configure itself to your e*act sys- 
tem, and surprise surprise, that's 
exactly whal it did on each of Ihe 
Amigas I tried it on, II correctly iden- 



tified my processor, the amount of 
RAM and available drive space, 

Anyway, once the program's 
loaded, you're greeted by the main 
screen which is divide into two 
ha ves. The top half contains the 
waveform window where any sam- 
ples that you record will be 
displayed. The bottom half contains 
the current options. The commonest 
editing and replay options such as 
cut, magnify, ramp, etc, are repre- 
sented by a strip ol icons, and these 
are permanently on the screen. 
Below this strip is a message line 
where you will be intormed of the 
Current status of the software, Below 
that is the current name and a real- 
time clock and calendar. Below 
those, the menu panel. 

Running along the top of the 
menu panel is a list of section but- 
tons, and clicking on any of these 
will fill the remainder of the screen 
with icons and options appropriate to 
the button pressed. 

The most important of these is 
the sampler button, which calls up 
the sampling options screen. As I've 
already mentioned, you can sample 
direct to disk (floppy or hard), and of 
course you can also sample to RAM. 
The maximum sampling rate is 
determined by ihe speed of your 
processor, so on a 68O40 machine 
the rate could be extremely good. 
On a 68030 it could manage 59,000 
Hertz in mono, whilst on an A1200 it 



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What About..? 



TECHNOSOUNDTURB0 2 

£49.95 - NEW DIMENSIONS - 0291 690901 



Technasouiid has been one of the best-selling Amiga sound samplers in Europe, With Ihe 
emphasis clearly on fun rather Chan quality, technasound 2 hits Ihe streets. 

Till unit consists of a small box that plugs into Ihe parallel interface, m nch the same as 
Megalosound. However, not only does it not include a hardware input dial, il costs. £15 
more. Why? Well to be honest I'm not really sure The hardware is no ditlerenl to that sap 
plied with the original Tech no sound, so alt changes are la the software. Unfortunately that 
is as gaudy as ever, perhaps with the nation thai bright automatically means fan; it 
doesn't,, - 

nevertheless, Technasound Is von/ much a sampler for the kind ol person who's never 
heard of slew panning or Input levels-, and wouldn't care il he had. It's pretty much a 
plug-in and go type nl unit. 

The software samples reasonably enough, and Mew Dimensions were in tact the first 
ones to oiler direct to hard disk recording. For same reason tfiey^e chosen to completely 
ignore the standard operating system, preferring instead to use their own custom menus 
ana requesters, which would he line il they were belter, but sadly they la 1 1 far short ol 
Commodore's guidelines- 
Still. Ihesoltware does have more gadgets and special elleols than any other budget 
sampler, many ol which can be performed in real time. Rather than the studio type eltacts 
found in Megalosound, Technasound has evocatively named elicits such as Deep Sea 
Diver, Chopper, Dark Vader and Awlul Ihe Duck (!) 

CONCLUSION 

Even nolo re Megalosound came along, TT2 was lookrncj rather pricey, now It just seems 
d bv> nri rjht expensive . true the effects are lun for a- while, and 1he sampling quality is as 
good as its rivals, hut there's something very superficial ahout Ihe program's design and 
appearance that I've never liked. Perhaps younger users may enjoy the <***. 
Blue Peter DIV look, I do not. W^ 

Compatibility: Any Amiga. 




■ W-r -•<•* «•-- 



Tsehnoaound 2 csrtainiy h»s more special eHgcl* lh»r> *ny other program, and lis ihese that 
make ttia program to much tun tor non-Mftout u«f s. 



176 



AUDIOMASTER 4 

TBA - HISOFT • 0525 713671 



USIC 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE '94 



Durrsanp letxanp I eC5k> 






i 




It's alt very well having a 
powerful sound sampler, 
but if you can't edit the 
sounds afterwards then 
they're very limited. 
Most samplers are OK, 
but you can't heat a ded- 
icated sample editor. . . 

A ..din master is undoubtedly 
the longest running editor 
on the Amiga, and It's now 
up to version 4. It consists 
of two main sections; the sampler 
and the editor. 

The sampler is desigred to wort with 
most hardware samplers, and simply 
permits you to record mono or stereo 
samples at up to 55,900 Hertz (assum- 
ing your hardware can handle such 
frequencies). Sampling can be started 
manually, or using the VOX feature 
which triggers the recorder only when 
sound ot a certain volume is heard, 

If you don r t own a sampler, you 
can use the program purely as an 
editor, and this is where its real 
power lies. Once you have a sample 
in memory {either by loading one or 
recording it) there are a range of edit- 
ing, filtering and effects that can be 
performed upon it. To be fair these 
are far less in either quantity or inter- 
est value than the effects contained 
in Technosound or Megaiosound's 
software. However, the significant 
difference is the quality and speed ol 
Aodiomaster's options. There are no 
quacks or daleks here, but if you're 
editing samples for serious use this 
is the package to use. 

In the Editl menu you'll rind the 
usual Cut, Paste and Copy options 
that are essential in any editing soft- 



ware. You'll also notice thai memory 
permitting, the program supports a 
spare buffer, and it's possible to mix 
samples together by using this facil- 
ity. Talking about basic editing, the 
program also provides a Ireehand 
drawing facility which becomes 
exceptionally powerful when used in 
conjunction with the program's pow- 
erful magnify options. 

By dragging ihe cursor across the 
screen, you can quickly define a 
range. It's then possible to perform 
most editing operations upon the 
range instead of the entire sample. 
You can also zoom into the selected 



range so that it (ills Ihe display. 
Alternatively you can use the Zoom 
button to perform a real-time zoom, 
centring on the indicated range. This 
is a very impressive feature which 
means that you can quickly find the 
optimum level ot magnification for 
your cunent requirements. 

Its in the Effects menu that the 
mosl powerful options are to be 
found, and I find that they are particu- 
larly useful for altering incorrectly 
recorded samples. For example you 
can use the Tune Waveform option to 
retune a sound, whilst Change vol- 
ume can be used to increase or 



decrease Ihe overall loudness of a 
sample - you can even specify a dif- 
ferent volume at the start to the end- 

These are just simple examples 
though, echoing and flanging are 
also available but by far the most 
exciting options are in the 
Duration/Pitch requester. Here you 
can alter the duration of all or part of 
a sample without altering its pitch, 
and conversely you can alter its pitch 
without affecting its duration. These 
are options which are traditionally 
found only in commercial hardware 
sample editors, so their appearance 
is a great bonus. 

CONCLUSION 

Audiomaster is a very high quality 

sample editor. Almost all aspects of 
the program are, intuitive to use, and 
although Megalosound is snapping at 
its heels, I think in terms of the speed 
and quality of the results 
Audiomaster still crosses the line 
first, but the gap is always closing. 
and of course, with the former pro- 
gram you get the sampling hardware 
as well. Compatibility: Any ^y^k 
Amiga. Qi^^ 




AUDITION 4 

£49.95 ■ Micropace - 0753 551888 



What About..? 





As manula cturers 1 ol the b est Amiga samp lers m on ey can buy , it's 
no surprise to see that Sunriie Industries also produce a sample 
ad itor. Bet haw does Aitditi cm 4 stand up to the co mp etilin n? 

The program was designed as a rival for Audiomasier 3, and at 
the lints offered many features not included in Duel's program. 
Qjtm strut k Hack with An rjiomasier 4, and included many ol the 
best lealures of Audition 4. However, Audition slit! has a number 
of tricks up its sieeve. 

The main advantage ol ihe program 1$ that its both quick and 
small. Its compact size makes it ideal far use un machines wilh 
a meg ol RAM or less. Wilhaul wanting Id labour the point, it 
contains all the same basic sampling features found in all Ihe 
other packages, such as cm, paste and copy, etc Naturally, it's 
down to Ms special features lo make Audition i stand out Yet 



again, il has a range ol audio effects that are similar to those 
offered by Technosound and Meplnsound. Flange, echo, lade, 
bass and treble boost, elc. These can also be performed in real 
lime. 

CONCLUSION 

Coming from SurtriH ihe sound quality ol samples edited wilh 
Audilion 4 remains excellent, and Ihe program has many nice fea- 
tures. The only thing is. ihe competition seems lobe such good 
value, that it's hard to justify the expense. Still, a goad solid pro- 
gram, that's worth purchasing if you see It in the bargain bucket 
somewhere. 

Compatibility: Any non-AGA | 
Amiga 






» 



I 



1T7 



I ■ I 



AMIGA BUYERS GUIDE 94 




GLOSSARY 



GS 

Short for General Standard. A stan- 
dard for MIDI instruments developed 
by Roland, It is a standard way of 

organising sound data within a MIDI 
instrument so that music on one GS 
instrument can be replayed on any 
other, regardless of its manufac- 
turer. Part of the GS standard 
specifies the minimum number of 
instruments as well as the order 
they're arranged in. It also specifies 
the effects that can be applied to a 
sound, and the instructions required 
to apply them. 

MIDI 

Musical Instnjmanl Digital Interface. 
Literally refers to the type of connec- 
tion present on electron ig equipment, 
usually computers or instruments, 
which permits the exchange of control 
commands between devices. Whilst 
these commands will usually be 
involved in the replay of music, Ihey 
may sometimes be used for corttrol- 
lingi more exotic equipment such as 
lights and mixing consoles. 

N ota tor 

Any music package which uses the tra- 
ditional system of bars and staves for 
note eniry and display, Deluxe Music is 
the best example of $uch a program. 

Real-time 

When using a piece of software, real- 
time means that you are performing 
an editing or recording function 'on 
the fly', in ihe case of sequencers, 
this means actually playing an instru- 
ment at the right lempo, and 
hopelully hitting the right notes. 



Sequencer 

Any program which can, store a fist 
of musical playing instructions, and 
can replay the list in real time to cre- 
ate music. Although tracker 
programs may literally be referred to 
as sequencers, the term is usually 
reserved for MIDI packages, espe- 
cially those which accept real-time 
input. 

Step-time 

In the case of sequencers, step-time 
is the opposite of real-lime. It means 
Itiat you enter music in your own 
lime, with no pressure to gel each 
note right, You may be using a key- 
board or the mouse or you might 
simply be editing lists of numbers at 
the computer keyboard. 

Tracker 

The generic name tor any music 
package which uses a character 
based note entry system and whose 
lineage can visibly be traced back to 
/Waster Soundtracker, the first such 
program to become popular. 

Traditional Notation 

The system of representing music as 
a series ol dots on a set of five 
ledger lines, Sheet music uses this 

system. 

Velocity Sensitive 

Refers to an instrument that 
responds to how hard you play it. For 
example, the harder you hit a piano 
key, the louder the note will be. 



No Man's An Island 



Dlray, so by nrjw you're hopefully making sweet music Why not share yaur interest wilh 
nl he i like- minded people? AH/FM stands lot Amiga Musician's Freeware Magazine and 

its a monthly disk publication pul tog Bihar by enthusiasts tor enthusiasts, 
Each issue comes wilh a selection of tracker so nes aid MIDI Hies tor you lo listen la. 

There s 2 Is a a variety of articles and product reviews as well as a selection ol PD titles to 

help you follow your musical interesls. 
Readers are invited lo seam it the It own lunes lor publication, and advice and letters are 

also printed. 
AM.'FM costs £2.50 an issue and is available Irom Sea&oH Cgmpuliog. 



1 

Have You Considered.*.? 

THE MED USERS GROUP 

it you re serious about your music and you think thai AfHJor DctaMED is Ihe greatest pack 

age in the world then you might I Ike to add your number lo Ihe hundreds ol people who 
agree with you. 

MUG (MED U$ER 4 S GROUP) 

provides 1 lorum lor like minded people lo exchange modules and lips, A bi-monthly disk 
Is available and there's no membership to pay You'll limj their address at Ihe bottom of 
this page, 



Address Book 



B.EM. 


MED User's Group 


Hew Dimensions 


395 Coldharbour 


(MUG) 


Brook lands House 


Lane 


6 Glevum Road 


Bryngwyn 


Brixton 


Straiten St 


Raglan 


SW9 


Margaret 


Gwenl 


Tel: 071 733 6821 


Swindon 


NP5 2AA 


Fax: 071 738 5266 


Wiltshire 


Tel: 0291 69O901 




SN3 4AF 


Fax: 0291 690933 


Electronic Arts 






90 Heron Drive 


Meridian 


Sea soft Computing 


Lang ley 


Distribution 


The Business 


Berkshire 


East House 


Centre 


SL3 8XP 


East Road 


80 Woodlands 


Tel: 0753 549442 


Industrial Estate 


Avenue 




London 


Rushngton 


Hieoft 


SW19 1AH 


West Sussex 


The Old School 


Tel: 081 543 3500 


BN16 3EV 


Greenfield 


Fan; 061 543 2255 


Tel: 0903 850376 


Bedford 






MK45 5DE 


Micropace 


Software Business 


Tel: 0525 713671 


Unit 10 


Cromwell Business 


Fan; 0525 71371 6 


Perth Trading 


Centre 




Estate 


New Road 


Holland Music 


Perth Avenue 


St Ives 


22-23 London Road 


Slough 


Huntingdon 


Tunbridge Wells 


Berkshire 


Cambridgeshire 


Kent 


SL1 4XX 


PE17 4BG 


TN1 1DA 


Tel: 0753 551886 


Tel: 04BD 496497 


Tel: 039 2 511501 


Fax: 0753 551 211 


Time & Space 


Key Audio Systems 


Mind scape 


PO Box 306 


Unit D 


Priority House 


Berk ham stead 


Robjohns Road 


Charles Avenue 


Herts 


Chelmsford 


Burgess Hill West 


HP4 3EP 


CM1 3AG 


Sussex 


Tel: 0442 870681 


Tel: 0245 344001 


RH1 5 9PQ 




Fax: 0245 344002 


Tel: 0444 482545 





HH 



■■■■■WE 






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1 1 Ml NATE K&Y THFMTS^N^ 

STROV THE BIQ-NUO 
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THfONE ... ' 

INC ClMPflNlTBlL RIGHTS WtSFHCTD. 

H UNDtH ULtNSL BV BtflCfc PEARL SOFTWfiRF, INC. 



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INTERNATIONAL- COMPUTER •ENTERTAINMENT 



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Manual in English. Manuel en franpais„ Handbuch auf deutsch, Manuals in italiano. Manual en espariol 



Distributed By AVAILABLE FOR: PC & 100% COMPATIBLES, AMIGA, CD32 

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NEWSAGENTS PiEUE i 
UNTIL FEItUMY 1994 
£3.tS 



»< OF Aft 1 ' 



•.»«'-«,« 



GAMES CM 

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND T) 
-WHKH GAMES DESERVE 
CASH AND WHICH ONE S I 

GRAPHICS MCKJ 

WE PUT YOU IN THE Pl( 




POWER M 



TRANSFORM YOUR 
INTO A SUPER COMPUT 



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